Kim Yunmi

Kim Yunmi's comments

"I'd like a recipe for Soju... Andong Soju. Show how to distill it, etc. I found something online, but then I'm not clear how to make it not turn into vinegar in those 3 weeks."
in Traditional Korean rice liquor (Makgeolli) — Nov/18

"Third to fourth day I would say since the sugars will break down if you do it longer or at the end."
in Traditional Korean rice liquor (Makgeolli) — Nov/18

"Technically not Makgeolli... since nuruk has other things besides yeast in it."
in Traditional Korean rice liquor (Makgeolli) — Nov/18

"You could, but Onggi are special in that they are made to breathe (as in the pot itself, not just the opening at the top. And Earthenware, in general are more Porous. It would be the same result as using say... a glass jar. Onggi, though, if you are a serious kimchi maker, want to make sauces, or Korean alcohol are a worthy investment. You can buy them online and sometimes from Korean markets."
in Traditional Korean rice liquor (Makgeolli) — Nov/18

"You can't make it without Nuruk... but I'm also hoping she posts how to make Nuruk."
in Traditional Korean rice liquor (Makgeolli) — Nov/18

"Me being Mi and all... Kinda wanted a recipe for Nuruk itself. 'cause I conquered soy sauce, made my own Kimchi (though still trying to find Eomma's Kimchi which is difficult), made my own Makgeolli--trying to make Soju too... so I figure making Nuruk can't be that much more difficult."
in Starter culture (Nuruk) — Nov/18

"Koji is not the same thing as Nuruk. Nuruk contains yeast plus other things. If you want to make sake, sure, use Koji, but it's not the same thing. What you need is all of the bacteria in question in the right balance and by that time it's just cheaper to buy the Nuruk."
in Starter culture (Nuruk) — Nov/18

"Try amazon if you're not near a Korean grocery store."
in Starter culture (Nuruk) — Nov/18

"I'd proof it like yeast and see if it works first."
in Starter culture (Nuruk) — Nov/18

"I don't think it's quite the same thing, but the Amylase is close. Nuruk, however, contains more than just the amylase. Also has yeast and other bacteria starters in it through the process of making it. Koji is good for making sake, but not soju."
in Starter culture (Nuruk) — Nov/18

"No. They are different things. Nuruk has: 2,6-Dimethoxybenzoquinone (2,6-DMBQ), also found in fermented wheat germ extract.[11] Microorganisms present in nuruk include Aspergillus, Rhizopus, and yeasts.[2][7] Together with yeast, nuruk is used in rice alcohol production in Korea, as it provides the enzyme amylase.[3] While Doenjang contains: Aspergillus oryzae and Bacillus subtilis Doenjang takes a lot longer to make. I would think you would want to correct flavor profile and to do the long process of making soy sauce with the blocks to make doenjang. If you aren't sure you can make stable blocks of Doenjang through that method, I'd mix some store-bought Cheongukjang and a good Doenjang with the soy beans. Do not use Nuruk."
in Starter culture (Nuruk) — Nov/18

"양조 is brewing soy sauce. As in the soy sauce is brewing..."
in Soy sauce (Ganjang) — Oct/18

"Indonesian soy sauce is different from Korean in that Indonesian uses other flavorants added. Korean soy sauce compared to Chinese soy sauce tends to harbor a rounder flavor. Indonesian as I understand it, adds things like Candlenuts, so it probably nuttier in flavor. Chinese soy sauce tends not to be as umame as Korean and is generally saltier. This is probably because less mold is allowed to be in the soy sauce. Korean adds kochu, jujubes, garlic and ginger. Indonesian adds other spices, so I don't think would be the same. (I also think the spices added are because of latitude--Indonesia uses far stronger spices, but is also closer to the equator, so you need more control over the bacteria and mold that does or does not grow.) Japanese, BTW, is milder than Chinese or Korean and lighter on salt because they can get away with it through how they process the soy sauce. (in the super traditional style). Fish sauce from Indonesia and Korea probably is different based on the fish used. Koreans vary based on region on which fish are used. Some Korean fish sauce adds shrimp top it too."
in Soy sauce (Ganjang) — Oct/18

"I've made meju before... it's better to seed it with Doenjang if you don't have rice straw. Also made soy sauce from scratch. ^_^ You get richer flavors in homemade soy sauce. I know the advanced and beginner's version."
in Meju blocks — Dec/15

"Chinese soysauce is traditionally made as a kinda stewish broth. Japanese soy sauce is made anaerobically. (Meaning without air--also without sun). This makes for a milder taste Traditional Korean soy sauce is made aerobically, as in with air. That is, they take the soybeans, boil them, form blocks, let them dry and then the soysauce is a byproduct of making doenjang. Koreans also traditionally added flavorings to control mold, etc, such as garlic, jujubes, ginger, seaweed, etc. Which makes for a darker, heavier, but also sweeter soy sauce. If the fermenting goes well, the umame flavor can be exquisite, but it really depends on the time it gets to ferment. Most of the soysauce preserves either better in a refrigerator or in direct sunlight after it's made. I store the soy sauce I made in leftover glass kimchi jars. All soy sauce gets darker as it ages more... and the flavor can become more intense, but the Korean method is very hard to control (Because Korean soy sauce is more like wine--you need the perfect conditions and weather to create it), which is why industrial soy sauce is usually not made through the Korean method anymore."
in Soy sauce (Ganjang) — Oct/15