uhmgawa

uhmgawa's comments

"If the broth is thin, over time the solid particles are going to settle out to the container bottom. As suggested, a stir will redistribute them. You can also add some starch or flour dissolved in cold water to increase the viscosity of the broth which will considerably slow the settle-out of suspended solids in the broth. I find this is also the only way when adding a beaten egg to get a "long threads" texture as the egg is gradually added and slowly drawn throughout the soup. Without modifying the viscosity of the broth, the resulting texture of the egg winds up as a foamy custard on top of the soup rather than long drawn threads fully integrated into the soup."
in Kimchi soup (Kimchi-guk) — Aug/17

"[Looks like my previous comment vanished. Please dispose of this if it is found to be a duplicate] I make a kimchi based soup which appears very similar to this recipe. It is a hybrid between a Chinese hot & sour, Japanese miso, and after reading this apparently Korean Kimchi as described. The difference is I don't usually add Japanese miso nor Korean hot bean paste, but use standard red cabbage kimchi including the fermentation liquid as the base along with a flavored broth. The kimchi is sliced into matchstick pieces while making sure none of the escaping fermentation liquid is lost. Whatever meat remnant I happen to have on hand is sliced paper thin along with an abundance of thin sliced quartered onions, very thin sliced mushroom (shiitake if possible), and soft tofu cut into 1cm cubes. What I do differently is increasing the body of the soup with a bit of starch (or flour) mixed with cold water. Reason being is just prior to serving and with the pot off-heat, I add beaten eggs slowly while stirring *very* slowly. The starch added viscosity helps keep the egg from disintegrating into foamy custard such that the result is long, thin streaks of egg throughout the soup. The texture of the egg is important and you really can't get the same results if reheating this soup as that tends to overcook the egg. After dispensing in serving bowls I add a few drops of sesame oil and spread that around the top surface of the soup with the bottom of a spoon. A heaping TBS of thinly sliced green onions sprinkled on top and it is ready. Additions I haven't yet tried but expect to work well are adding bamboo shoots (also matchstick sliced), and Japanese kikuage (Chinese black fungus). The name could sure use some marketing spin, but is a common stable in Chinese soup which adds a unique and desirable texture."
in Kimchi soup (Kimchi-guk) — Aug/17