Mikura

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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 18 total)
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  • in reply to: korean fusion food – any ideas for the beginning? #55747

    Mikura
    Participant

    Hi, I thought I’d share some untraditional things that I absolutely love. Not sure if they’re all “fusion” but hope its interesting nonetheless.

    1) Adding maple syrup to dried seafood dishes. Like myeolchi bokkeum and ojingeochae muchim. Replace the sugar with maple syrup, and it gives a more complex sweet taste that complements dried fish very well… absolutely delicious! I wouldn’t do this for any kind of soup or stew though.

    2) Doenjang guk with non-traditional greens, particularly kale and beet greens. Beet greens gives it a nice color too. The doenjang tones the strong bitter flavor of these greens and goes very well with them. I like to not boil it too long though, just enough to soften them a bit, but not too much so the flavor of the greens isn’t all boiled off.

    3) “kimchi” salads. One that I love is mixing really fermented kimchi, steamed, cubed potatoes, cooked peas and carrots, raw onion, cucumber, and seasoning it with some kimchi juice, a little gochujang, sesame oil, and extra salt, vinegar, and sugar. Kind of like koreanized russian salad. The cucumber gives a nice refreshing taste, and the potato cuts through the other strong flavors. You can also omit peas and carrots and replace the potato, cucumber, and vinegar with some corn, cilantro, and lime juice to make a “koreanized” salsa. Lovely!!

  • in reply to: How to say "I like it spicy"? #55627

    Mikura
    Participant

    In Korean, if you want to ask for something to be made spicy, you can say “maepgae haeju saeyo” (맵게 해주세요), which means “please make it spicy”. If you want to say you want it really hot, you can add the word “aju” (아주) in the front, meaning “very”, i.e. “aju maepgae haeju saeyo”

  • in reply to: Wheat in Korean Soy Sauce? #55498

    Mikura
    Participant

    I have a bottle of soup soy sauce in my pantry that does not contain wheat. It is made by Sempio and the labelled has red, orange, and yellow coloring.

    Theres another product also made by sempio called chosun (korean) soy sauce that doesn’t contain wheat. I believe its supposed to resemble more traditional Korean soy sauce without and wheat and lighter in color and flavor. It’s in a cute plastic bottle thats shaped like a traditional korean onggi, its white and orange colored with a picture of an onggi on the bottle. Link below shows a picture. Again, check labels to make sure.

    http://www.lotteplaza.com/product/product_view.php?lan=ENG&Category=62&id=873

  • in reply to: Spicy chicken with fermented shrimp #55450

    Mikura
    Participant

    Sounds simple but delicious. What book did you get it out of just out of curiosity? I personally love looking at old school cookbooks and relearning what kinds of things people used to eat.


  • Mikura
    Participant

    Actually, small correction. If you’re talking about the big dried thai peppers (around the thickness of an adult male’s thumb), NOT the small one (thinner than a pinky finger), you can probably use those with decent results. I just saw them at a thai market today and realized that might have been what you were talking about.

  • in reply to: Will WHOLE dehydrated Thai peppers make good pepper flakes? #55429

    Mikura
    Participant

    Unfortunately, Thai peppers are NOT a good substitute. They are mostly just spicy, rather than the more earthy, fruity and moderately spicy Korean peppers. Cayenne also makes a poor substitute as it is too spicy. If you absolutely cannot find gochugaru, you can probably get by with using guajillo, ancho, or Hungarian paprika as these have the most similar profile to gochugaru that I can think of. I’ve never actually used these in kimchi though, so cant be certain.

  • in reply to: Growing ingredients (seeds/varieties) #51187

    Mikura
    Participant

    I think germinating perilla seeds can be fickle due to dormancy issues. Some people say they may be dormant for over a year. Personally, instead of dealing with the seeds, I just take cuttings from an existing plant and root them to keep a constant supply of new perilla plants. They are very easy to root in my experience, as long as you keep the cutting in soil in a quite humid container until they form roots. The only drawback of course is that you need an existing perilla plant, but I’ve even been able to root cuttings found in a korean grocery store. Hope that gives some good suggestions. I’m zone 7 so I guess your mileage may vary.

  • in reply to: How long can I keep kimchi? #52345

    Mikura
    Participant

    To mizufashion and farmer82,

    Actually, in my opinion, you guys have made the best kimchi possible… tart, fizzy, and refreshing. If I were you, I would use the same method especially to make water kimchis…. you can use that fizzy broth as a base for some absolutely spectacular naengmyun!

  • in reply to: GLUTEN FREE Doenjang #55178

    Mikura
    Participant

    In addition to the above post, a lot of the bigger Korean markets now sell doenjang made without wheat from most big Korean food manufacturers. They are usually labeled as 콩된장 (kong doenjang) or 집된장 (jip doenjang), to emphasize that they are made with soybeans or the kind of doenjang that is traditionally made at home. However, these labels dont guarantee that its gluten free. Look for those words on the front, and double check the back ingredients list to make sure theres no wheat products in it.

  • in reply to: Does anyone know what this marinade is? #55164

    Mikura
    Participant

    Restaurants seem to use that kind of sauce especially on pork belly, and the pork is submerged in the sauce right before grilling rather than marinating for a long period. From what I can gather, it basically tastes like bulgogi marinade, but a little less concentrated in the soy/sugar department, and with more garlic and ginger added. I’m thinking restaurants put a bit of MSG to give it that savory flavor, but perhaps a few splashes of fish sauce can be used as a substitute. Just my 2 cents.

  • in reply to: Tofu, Frozen UMMM? #55118

    Mikura
    Participant

    Freezing tofu absolutely destroys the texture (I speak from unfortunate experience). However, it resembles the texture of tofu skin, so you can actually still use it in stir fry dishes, or marinated in sweet sauce (similar to the taste in yubu chobap).

    Hope that helps!

  • in reply to: for my friend #55072

    Mikura
    Participant

    Can I suggest making samgyeopsal gui?

    Grilled pork belly BBQ (Samgyeopsal-gui)

    Most of my Korean friends love getting together and eating this, and the communal aspect of cooking it, wrapping it up, and eating it together almost always puts everyone in a good mood. Plus, it is easy to prepare as long as you have the ingredients. If you want to be extravagant, you can have some doenjang jjigae alongside, which goes well and is again easy to prepare.

    https://www.maangchi.com/recipe/tofu-stew-doenjang-chigae

  • in reply to: *how to make black bean paste* #53036

    Mikura
    Participant

    I can attest that the sauce described by ze125 makes a good substitute to jjajang sauce because I make a very similar version. Because chunjang can be hard to find, I found that using Chinese fermented black beans (called douchi 豆豉) or Chinese yellow bean paste (huangjiang 黄酱 or some brands say ganjiang 干酱) lends a very similar, though not identical, taste to chunjang. Just use it like you would chunjang in Maangchi’s recipe or in the recipe above.

  • in reply to: Korean for "Bonito Flakes" #55022

    Mikura
    Participant

    The Korean word for bonito flakes gasseuobushi; its just borrowed from the Japanese word katsuobushi. These days more and more Koreans are using bonito flakes so I’ve seen it sold in many Korean grocery stores, but not all.

  • in reply to: Bean sprout soup, fishy aftertaste? #54992

    Mikura
    Participant

    I find that this soup can be fishy too if not prepared correctly, but if you follow Maangchi’s recipe correctly, it should taste fine. The most important thing is to put the bean sprouts in the pot along with cold water, put on the lid, and keep it closed throughout the boiling process until it is cooked. If you dont cover it throughout the entire heating process, the soup tends to taste fishy. Also, the roasted flavor of sesame does an excellent job of cutting fishiness, so its important to use well roasted and crushed sesame seeds as well as sesame oil. Hope that helps!

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 18 total)