RonPaul

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  • in reply to: Hello from Virginia! #52721
    RonPaul
    Member

    If your in NOVA, I’m coming over for dinner.

    in reply to: I have arrived in Heaven finding your Website. #52251
    RonPaul
    Member

    Yvonne, I’d love to hear more about that friendship and your Korean food journey. Was there a Korean grocery at that time back in the 70’s? What was your very first Korean food exposure like?

    in reply to: New fan of this website #52534
    RonPaul
    Member

    Documentary about Korean-Kazakhs

    http://koryosaram.net/trailer.html

    Hardy plucky folk….

    in reply to: New fan of this website #52533
    RonPaul
    Member

    Hi catmyrza,

    I find your post to be extremely fascinating! Obscure history combined with personal stories/details is always a big hit with me.

    Please share more!

    I love how the sharing of food leads to the sharing of many more things.

    in reply to: Typical Dinner Menu? #52420
    RonPaul
    Member

    I second samyoowell’s post as being very accurate, in relation to my experience.

    For myself, if I recall growing up, on a good day there’d be about 3 banchan that I liked (ex. kimchi, stir-fried dried anchovy, stir-fried fish cakes) and then like 2 or 3 other side-dishes that I wasn’t too attracted to, and so I avoided.

    Then we each got a fist-sized bowl of rice, and a fist sized bowl of soup or stew (Sollongtang, kalbitang, Soft tofu stew, Jjamppong, or my favorite Rice cake soup). On the weekend or something, we might grill Kalbi or bulgogi or spicy pork bulgogi (with fresh lettuce wraps), in place of, or in addition to the soup/stew.

    On a slumm’n day when mom was a slack’n, there’d be just rice and like 1 or 2 banchan, and then a side dish of salty beef or mandu dumplings.

    I remember being a kid bratting-out and crying for a BigMac on the way home, and then upon sitting down at the table, me with my McD’s, and my parents with korean food in front of them, I’d suddenly realize how bland my dinner was in comparison, and so I’d eat just a few bites of my Mcdonalds, and grab a bowl of rice, so I could eat the Korean food instead.

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    in reply to: We Love Maangchi!!!! #52379
    RonPaul
    Member

    You’re scottish korean?

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rJwaRryAlEk

    in reply to: Raw Crab wtih sauce #52267
    RonPaul
    Member

    The restaurant down the street includes this as 1 of the ban chan items.

    It’s SOOO GOOOD.

    Cooked crab (steamed + oldbay seasoning) is one of my top favorite foods.

    But raw crab is like an espresso version of cooked crab. The crab flavor is so strong yet since the meat is more liquid than solid, it is so fleeting. Together with the spicy red sauce. It’s heaven.

    But I’m a huge neurotic wimp, and I always worry I’m going to catch some raw food illness, so my mind does war with my mouth whenever the waitress puts it down on the table. The mouth always wins. One day, I’m going to regret it I think.

    Also the leftover sauce is flavored very well by the crab. I hoard this sauce like it’s liquid gold even after all the crab is gone, and i just keep dipping my chopsticks in it and licking my chopsticks like a crackaddict.

    in reply to: Making Dotorimuk From Scratch #51860
    RonPaul
    Member

    I could pronounce it out for you but not translate it. Sorry, I’m no help…

    But I like how they drew out 5.5 cups of water at the top of the instructions…=)

    in reply to: Kimchi rice #51835
    RonPaul
    Member

    Oh, THAT San Gabriel, CA USA restaurant?? USA right?

    Are you 9?

    Bibimbop is a very common rice dish that is topped off with an egg, most often favored by non-koreans. It’s comfort food that easily translates across palates. It has many ingredients, but no kimchi.

    in reply to: Cooking rice without a rice cooker #51773
    RonPaul
    Member

    1 part sticky rice with 1 part water.

    Cover.

    High heat.

    Once it starts steaming full throttle like a tea pot, throw the heat down to warm/low.

    Let it cool down/continue to cook for 7-12 minutes.

    Scoop out your rice, but make sure to leave the bottom layer of burnt rice for a crunchy rice snack later that day.

    in reply to: Breakfast in Korea #51698
    RonPaul
    Member

    As a korean child born in the states, the idea of eating Korean food for breakfast seems bizarre to me. But now that I think of it, whenever I was sick, my mom would make me a very simple Korean breakfast: rice porridge (“juke”?) and a side dish of like a pulled beef in soy sauce (anyone know what this is called?) and some sort of kimchi.

    Is this a breakfast typically made in Korea for when you have the cold/flu?

    in reply to: THANK YOU #51731
    RonPaul
    Member

    “…really helpful to my generation of gals who want to cook Korean food…”

    PFFh. your generation. Guys wanna cook Korean food too.

    Nice username William Hung. BTW I’m from Langley.

    in reply to: Duk Gook? #51757
    RonPaul
    Member

    I second this. bali heh! ah loh ?!

Viewing 13 posts - 1 through 13 (of 13 total)