Best brand of short grain rice?

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    • #62043
      Tosin_Oc
      Participant

      I LOVE the Megumi brand, the grains are like beautiful tiny polished pearls. However I can’t seem to find it anywhere anymore :(
      Can anyone recommend a really delicious brand of short grain rice? Thanks all!

    • #62219
      EvilGrin
      Participant

      My personal favorite is

      Kagayaki Select Koshihikari. My market sells it for $25/15lbs
      http://www.amazon.com/Kagayaki-Select-Rice-4-4-lbs/dp/B0057H5JP2

      Tamaki Gold is even better but much harder for me to get locally and crazy expensive when i can find it. http://www.tamakimai.com/product.html

      Ive been happy with this one too
      http://www.amazon.com/Shirakiku-Rice-Koshihikari-15-Pound/dp/B0093ZTUEA/ref=pd_sim_325_10?ie=UTF8&refRID=0CCN9ZH7H7JEGR3SXZ4Y

      This one is also very good and sometimes a tiny bit cheaper than Kagayaki Koshihikari. Its a Koshihikari hybrid but still a short grain
      http://akechi.us/shop/food/rice/short-grain-white-rice/hitomebore-rice-15.html

    • #62220
      Lynnjamin
      Participant

      I love Sekka brand short grain rice. Maybe mostly because the bag is so pretty!

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    • #62222
      Tosin_Oc
      Participant

      Thanks so much! Through lots of research I discovered that its the Koshihikari variety of short grain rice that I like so much. There are different brands of this type of rice, Megumi being one of them. I found a different one called Sunshine Moonlight, a Californian brand, and it’s identical to Megumi and a very reasonable price. Yay!!

      Here’s a link http://www.hmart.com/shopnow/shopnow_newsub.asp?p=761898640203

    • #62224
      EvilGrin
      Participant

      Koshihikari is the “Cadillac” of short grain rice varieties. Imports from Japan are virtually nonexistent in the USA. While typically its used for sushi, its still fantastic for other uses. I rinse mine first until the water runs clear and soak for an hour or two before cooking.

      The Sekka is good but its a medium grain more similar to a calrose such as Botan or Kukuho Rose Both are very good California hybrids.

      If you like the Sekka i strongly suggest trying the Hitomebore i linked also. The flavor and texture is excellent.

    • #62225
      Tosin_Oc
      Participant

      Evilgrin how does Hitomebore compare to Koshihikari? Thanks!

    • #62231
      EvilGrin
      Participant

      Hitomebore is a Koshihikari hybrid of Japanese origins. Unlike calrose which is a California medium grain hybrid. IMO, flavor quality is excellent and it has a nice “toothy texture”. Most people would not be able to tell the difference between the two.

      http://commongrains.com/japanese-rice/

      Like most modern Japanese rice varieties, hitomebore was born in a local agricultural station. This short-grain variety was bred in Miyagi prefecture from koshihikari, and can be grown in far north regions without sacrificing flavor. Its name means “love at first sight,” and it is currently the second most popular rice in Japan. It is eaten plain or in sushi or onigiri.

    • #62233
      EvilGrin
      Participant

      I would also like to mention Kokuho Rose (pink label). Its a very good medium grain for the money. Costco sometimes has it for around $21/25lbs. Many of my Korean and Asian friends buy it.

      It costs only slightly more than Botan at Walmart but i like it better. Its a exceptional value for a rice of this quality and it goes well with nearly any main dish.

    • #62251
      Tosin_Oc
      Participant

      Oh wow, very informative. Thanks EvilGrin! So is Koshihikari the number one rice in Japan?

    • #62252
      Tosin_Oc
      Participant

      Ah interesting about the Kokuho Rose rice. As a medium grain, how does it compare to Nishiki? Sorry, can you tell I’m obsessed with rice?? Haha :D

    • #62301
      EvilGrin
      Participant

      Koshihikari is the best selling variety in Japan. Almost none is exported. Ive never found any Japanese grown in the USA and i have 2 giant Asian markets plus several smaller ones near me.

      Ive never compared Nishiki to Kokuho Rose but it gets good reviews too.

    • #62383
      Tosin_Oc
      Participant

      Thanks so much EvilGrin, just been to my local Hmart and spent literally an hour studying all the different types of rice! I bought a bag that just said ‘sushi rice’ lol. I bought it because I saw so many people loading up their shopping trolleys with huge bags of it! I only bought a small bag to try. I also got a bag of what appears to be a generic medium grain rice. I bought that one mainly for paella. Then I got a big 15lb bag of the sunshine moonlight koshihikari which I know I love and a bag of Thai jasmine rice, which also came in a million different brands and confused the heck out of me! Oh I also saw the Kokuho rose that you mentioned but it only came in a giant 40lb bag! I just wanted a bit to try. If you think koshihikari is more superior I’d probably just stick to that. Some brands were shockingly expensive, like £35 ($55) for a 5lb bag!I was soooo tempted to buy to see what made it so special! I remember when I used to think rice was just rice. How wrong was I? Ha!

    • #62385
      Tosin_Oc
      Participant

      These are the ones I got today :D

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    • #62393
      EvilGrin
      Participant

      I love love love good Jasmine rice with curry. Nothing smells like Jasmine. I also like Jasmine for fried rice. Ive tried the brand you got and it is just fine.

      I would guess that most Koshihikari is going to be better than Kokuho Rose. Sometimes though cooking technique will trump variety.

    • #62439
      Tosin_Oc
      Participant

      You’re right, technique is so important and to be honest, besides Nishiki which I found to be a little bland, all the other types of rice I tried have turned out pretty good. Is there a prevailing superior Thai jasmine rice I should know about? lol!

      Oh one last question! Are all Koshihikari rice the same?

      Thanks!

    • #62452
      EvilGrin
      Participant

      Dynasty brand is available almost anywhere including common grocery chains.

      Golden Phoenix is ranked very high but it was no better than others ive tried.

      The main thing is make sure its grown in Thailand. North Eastern areas are considered the best. Texas grown Jasmine is bland IMO.

      See the green seal in the lower left? That means its 92% or higher fragrant Jasmine.

      Its my opinion that Tamaki Gold is the best Koshihikari grown in the USA. Kagayaki Select is also very good and far more available to me. These two stand out from the rest IMHO in flavor and aroma.

      Kagayaki also has a Select grade of brown Koshihikari that is outstanding if you like brown rice.

    • #62455
      Tosin_Oc
      Participant

      Oh thanks so much EvilGrin!! I don’t think either of those brands are available here in the UK. At least I haven’t seen them at H-Mart or other Asian supermarkets. I do like that Sunshine moonlight Seoul Trading super premium short grain rice though. I also saw one called Phoenix Koshihikari Sushi Rice at Costco (in a dark red bag with the sun on it) but wasn’t sure what it was going to be like so didn’t buy it lol. Will look out for Dynasty jasmine rice today!

    • #62457
      EvilGrin
      Participant

      Ive never seen Phoenix sushi rice here. I did find this at the Costco UK website.

      http://warehouses.costco.co.uk/webdocs/pdf/prodfeat/153876_productDetails.pdf

      Origin: USA/Spain/Argentina

      Im guessing since you are in the UK, it likely comes from Spain and i know very little about the quality of their rice.

      At the moment both of my local Costco stores dont have any good rice varieties except for Basmatti and Jasmine. They have been out of Kokuho Rose and Botan for months. Jasmine is very high on the glycemic index (over 100) so i dont eat it as often.

    • #62458
      EvilGrin
      Participant

      I found this about the Soul Trading Company Sunshine Moonlight sushi rice available here in the USA. Its actually……

      http://www.hmart.com/shopnow/shopnow_newsub.asp?p=761898653692

      AKITAKOMACHI

      Akitakomachi is a high-end, short-grain rice from Akita prefecture, similar to koshihikari but slightly less sticky. It was cross-bred in Akita prefecture in 1975 from strains from Fukui prefecture. Because its water content is high, its grain stays plump; Akitakomachi is especially favored for sushi, for mochi (where a bit of chewiness is required), and portable foods like onigiri (where the grains cling together even when cold).

      Hmmm now i must go find some to try. Sounds tasty.

    • #62459
      Tosin_Oc
      Participant

      Haha, I’ve been obsessing over rice like you wouldn’t believe! I actually bought the Seoul Trading Sunshine Moonlight Akitakomachi rice yesterday, they make both Akitakomachi and koshihikari rice. Then I went to another store only to find my favourite Megumi brand Koshihikari rice so I bought 2 x 20lb bags of that. Now I have enough rice to last me a year! I had some of the Seoul trading Koshihikari for lunch today and it was delicious but not quite as good as Megumi koshi rice. The grains weren’t as glossy and were a tiny bit less fluffy. Though I think my cooking technique might have interfered because I used a tiny pot and there wasn’t much room for steam to circulate so it didn’t cook evenly. I’ll cook some of both the koshihikari and the Akitakomachi and compare tomorrow. I’ll take some pics and do a mini review lol :D

    • #62471
      Tosin_Oc
      Participant

      Okay so I conducted the experiment, I cooked both the Koshihikari and Akitakomachi today! I washed both types of rice the same way, scrubbed gently 20 times and rinsed 5 times and did equal quanity rice and water per Maangchi’s recipe. Let them both stand for 30 minutes then brought them up to a boil, reduced the heat and steamed for 10 mins, turned off the heat and let them stand for a further 10 minutes then I tasted both and stared at them for a disturbing length of time.

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    • #62473
      Tosin_Oc
      Participant

      Looking at in raw, they looked identical. Koshihikari on the left and Akitakomachi on the right

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    • #62475
      Tosin_Oc
      Participant

      Cooked though they looked and tasted different. The koshihikari grains were dryer looking and stickier than the Akitakomachi which looked more glossy and more separate. Tastewise, the kohishihikari rice was definitely chewier with a sweeter flavour and the Akitakomachi was softer and fluffier, mild flavour and more slippery on the tongue. Both absolutely delicious! I would probably use the Koshihikari for plain rice and the Akitakomachi for dishes like fried rice. If I had to choose one though, I think I’d go with the Koshihikari as it’s got a slightly more satisfying chew :D

      So in summary;

      KOSHIHIKARI (top pic) – sticky, firmer chewy more ‘intact’ grains, dryer texture, sweet aftertaste

      AKITAKOMACHI (bottom pic) – less sticky, softer fluffier grains with a slippery feel, glossy waxy texture, mild flavour – no discernible aftertaste

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    • #62478
      Tosin_Oc
      Participant

      In the end I turned the Akitakomachi into Kimchi boekumbap and it was a very yummy lunch!

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    • #62481
      Tosin_Oc
      Participant

      Actually looking at the pictures again, I think the Koshikari rice grains are ever so slightly smaller.

    • #63516
      Emptydorobako
      Participant

      My favorite rice is Satsuki brown rice. I need to wash it many many times, but it worth it.

    • #63519
      EvilGrin
      Participant

      I recently got some Akitaotome rice grown in California. I cant find much info on it other than it appears to be slightly less sticky than Koshihikari or Hitomebore.
      http://products.ntcltdusa.com/categories/rice/

      My best guess is its a cross between Hitomebore and Akitakomachi. Its ok but the aroma is not quite as good as others ive tried.

    • #69360
      Ats
      Participant

      TAMAKI GOLD is the high end.

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    • #69362
      Ats
      Participant

      I also like TAMA-NISHIKI.

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    • #69365
      EvilGrin
      Participant

      Interesting but ive never seen that brand at any of our markets.

      Tamanishiki is a short-grain variety of Japonica rice that combines Koshihikari and Yumegokochi rice strains, giving it a rich flavour and excellent texture.

      Lately ive been trying some of the Cali grown Korean varieties which are an exceptional value. They are even cheaper than Botan or Kukuho Rose pink label.

      One of the Korean markets has a cafe which serves Rhee Chun and also sells Daippong brand.

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