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“Korean cold cures?”

  • 10 posts
  • started 3 years ago by leahangel
  1. I just started a new quarter at school and have already come down with a cold (sore throat, sniffly nose, tired).

    Are there any good Korean cold remedies?

    I ate a bowl of shin raymun and added gochujang and red pepper left over from kimchi making to try and burn the cold out haha.

    -Leah

  2. you had the right idea. koreans tend to fight colds with a lot of heat and sweat. my favourite treatment is this:
    http://www.maangchi.com/recipe/yukgaejang
    make sure, you use a lot of pepper and eat it scolding hot. this will sweat the cold right out of you.
    also. ramyon is not good when you have a cold... to many chemicals.

    also, there is this concoction of chicken soup, lots of lemon and garlic. many swear on it, personally i find it revolting.

  3. Thanks Kumaxx, that beef soup seems like it would do the trick!
    I hadn't seen that recipe yet. I love a nice scalding hot soup when I'm sick :)

    I am sorry I ate the ramyon, it's also so full of salt. Not good when you're trying to flush stuff out of your body I'm sure.

    Chicken soup with lemon and garlic sounds good too. What is it called in Korean?

  4. You've probably gotten over your cold right now, but I can tell you what my mother would cook whenever I was sick. Same principle: burning the cold out of you. She's make a shrimp broth with whole shrimp, add gochu powder, cilantro, garlic, onions, and about a cup of chopped jalapeno peppers and let it stew until done. Or she'd make me a bowl of ox tail soup with turnip and add (again) about a cup of chopped jalapenoes.

    Warning: do NOT slurp if you make this. I did it once and just a small bit splashed against the top of my throat and launched me into coughing/gasping/spasms for a good 10 mins.

    The key is the peppers. I like jalapenos b/c they add a sweetness. Don't use habanero peppers b/c they add too much of a smoke flavor, although Thai bird chilies are a good choice as well, but I'd limit them to 1/4 of a cup.

    Make sure you dive right into a pre-warmed bed (preferrably with an electric blanket or mattress top set to #3) and sleep for a long, long time. You'll feel right as rain and knock that cold out in no time.

  5. Yesterday, when I was researching bellflower root (doraji), I came across this information. In Korea, it is believed that bellflower root helps with colds and coughing. Dont' know if it works, but its worth a try and it's also very delicious!

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Platycodon_grandiflorus

    http://aeriskitchen.com/2008/12/dried-bellflower-root-도라지doraji/

    http://taoism.about.com/od/herbsthattransformphlegm/g/Jie_Geng.htm

    Hope that helps!

    ryan :)

  6. My mom would make me kongnamul guk but had a ton of hot pepper flakes. Or even Miyuk guk because it has a lot of calcium in it.

  7. It's not really a Korean recipe, but it follows the same principles as previous posts: my grandma used to make a concoction in the form of a tea that will clear anything out. She makes a lemon ginger tea, then dresses it with honey and one or two drops (only one or two) of thyme oil. The thyme oil is very hot and opens up your nasal passages. The lemon and ginger tea is soothing, plus it tastes good with the honey.

  8. It's not really a Korean recipe, but it follows the same principles as previous posts: my grandma used to make a concoction in the form of a tea that will clear anything out. She makes a lemon ginger tea, then dresses it with honey and one or two drops (only one or two) of thyme oil. The thyme oil is very hot and opens up your nasal passages. The lemon and ginger tea is soothing, plus it tastes good with the honey.

  9. I love everyone's info thanks!! This community is the best :)

  10. When my husband was my boyfriend, he made me "traditional Korean medicine" for a cold. It was honey, garlic, bean sprouts and Korean pear. As you can imagine, it tasted disgusting (even with a very stuffy nose, I could taste how bad it was. I don't trust that this is truly a traditional Korean cold remedy, but he still claims that it is for real. Hmmm....


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