Recipes

Endive mash with meatballs

Stamppot rauwe andijvie

Today we are going to learn 2 Dutch recipes! Reinier showed me how to make raw endive mash and Dutch meatballs, two national dishes from his country!  I filmed the video with Reinier when I visited Rotterdam, Netherlands for my Gapshida project. Alex volunteered to be our cameraman. Reinier has been cooking Korean food on regular basis. He has his own channel on YouTube and has been uploading Dutch recipes as well as Korean recipes. Endive mash is eaten in the cold winter and usually served with meatballs. Enjoy the recipe!

Raw endive mash

Ingredients:
Potatoes, endive cabbage, milk, mustard, butter, ground black pepper, salt, ground nutmeg, vinegar, bacon (or pork belly).

ingredients

Directions (for 4 servings):
cooking time: 40 minutes

  1. Cut 250 grams (about ½ pound) of bacon into small pieces and cook until crispy. Set aside.
  2. Cut a whole bunch of endive (400-500 grams: 1 pound) into thin strips. Wash, drain, and set aside.
  3. Boil water in a large pot for the potatoes.
  4. Peel 1 kg (2.2 pounds) of potatoes. Clean them, cut  into large chunks, and put them into boiling water until cooked.
  5. Drain and mash the potatoes. Add ½ cup of milk little by little to make a smooth puree.
  6. Add  the bacon, 1 tbs mustard, 2 tbs butter, 1 ts ground nutmeg, 1 ts ground black pepper, and ¼ ts salt, and mix it well.
  7. Add the shredded endive bit by bit to allow it to shrink a little as you go.
  8. Add 1-2 ts  vinegar and mix it well.

Serve with gravy and a meatball.

Dutch meatballs

Ingredients:
Ground beef and pork, mustard, ketjap manis, salt, ground black pepper, ground nutmeg, eggs, bread crumbs, butter

Directions (for 4 servings):
cooking time: 40 minutes

  1. Mix these ingredients in a bowl by hand until well combined and sticky:
    500 grams of ground beef and pork mix, 2 tbs mustard, 2 tbs ketjap manis, ¼ ts salt, ½ ts ground black pepper, 1 ts ground nutmeg, ⅓ cup bread crumbs, and 2 eggs.
    *tip: You can replace 2 tbs ketjap manis with 2 tbs soy sauce and ½ tbs brown sugar
  2. Divide the mixture into 4 large balls.
  3. Heat up a covered pot or pan with over medium high heat.
  4. Add ¼ cup butter and wait until it turns brown.
  5. Cook the meatballs until all sides are golden brown.
  6. Turn down the heat and simmer for about 25-30 minutes. Flip occasionally until thoroughly cooked.
  7. Take the meatballs out of the pot out and set aside.
  8. Add ¼ cup water to the pot and cook over low heat to make gravy. You can add 1 ts flour to make it sticky.

 

Advertisement

19 Comments:

  1. Jasper Philippines My profile page joined 5/11
    Posted February 18th, 2012 at 11:26 am | # |

    Wow, wow, wow!!! I’m a university student studying far away from home. I just got home the other day. And this evening, I cooked this dish for family. Super delicious… My mom liked the endive mash so much, and I did too. The meatball was good too, but the mash was our favorite part. My sister didn’t like it though… She doesn’t like foreign food too much. Maybe her taste buds will change once she grows older? Thanks so much Reinier and Maangchi. By the way, your Gapshida trip is so inspiring for me, Maangchi. It’s like you showed me that it’s possible to travel and pursue our own passions and interests.

  2. Cornish Hen Recipes Vietnam My profile page joined 2/12
    Posted February 2nd, 2012 at 5:17 am | # |

    wow this dish is amazing, i will give this recipe a try this dinner :D

  3. orangetkdgirl Seattle, WA My profile page joined 7/09
    Posted February 1st, 2012 at 12:21 am | # |

    Also, what are good alternative vegetables to use? I read online that mustard greens was a good substitute for endive, but I thought the taste was too strong. What about curly endive? I just found it today after I made this dish a couple days ago, and was wondering what the difference is in their taste. It’s very hard to find the kind of endive you used in your recipe where I’m from. :(

    • Reinier Rotterdam, The Netherlands My profile page I'm a fan! joined 2/09
      Posted February 2nd, 2012 at 1:16 pm | # |

      If you can’t find the right endive at all you can try leek. Cut them in rings and stir fry them for a few minutes and add them to the mashed potatoes. Then it’s called Stamppot Prei.

      • Smeglish Cerritos, CA My profile page joined 3/12
        Posted March 1st, 2012 at 2:40 pm | # |

        Reinier, do you think that the endive you are using in the video is called escarole here in the States?

  4. orangetkdgirl Seattle, WA My profile page joined 7/09
    Posted January 27th, 2012 at 6:30 pm | # |

    What type of mustard should I use for this?

  5. MariskaLim Jakarta, Indonesia My profile page I'm a fan! joined 2/11
    Posted January 21st, 2012 at 12:30 pm | # |

    0-0!!! you make me drooling in 0:29 AM… :9~

    Its pretty hard to find endive here, can i use lettuce instead?

    • Reinier Rotterdam, The Netherlands My profile page I'm a fan! joined 2/09
      Posted January 21st, 2012 at 3:14 pm | # |

      Thank you Mariska! I love your gado-gado! Indonesian food is very populair here, you can get it as take out everywhere. Endive is very crunchy, if you find crunchy lettuce it might work, but nothing beats Endive.

      • ISHA KUALA LUMPUR, MALAYSIA My profile page joined 12/11
        Posted January 26th, 2012 at 8:31 am | # |

        Hi Reinier,
        I wonder just using meat without pork.Cannot take pork in my meals.so, is that ok ?

        • Reinier Rotterdam, The Netherlands My profile page I'm a fan! joined 2/09
          Posted January 27th, 2012 at 4:50 pm | # |

          Yes ISHA, you can make the meatballs with only minced beef and just skip the bacon. Good luck!

  6. sirdanilot Terneuzen, The Netherlands My profile page joined 10/09
    Posted January 21st, 2012 at 12:20 pm | # |

    Hi, I am from Holland too and it’s great to see someone sharing authentic Dutch food with others !

    I can assure you this is a very good and authentic way of making this delicious dish. I should try to put ketjap manis in the meatball, my family doesn’t do that usually but it seems to be a good idea.

    I have an extra tip though: cook the potatoes in just enough water to cover them and with fully closed lid to keep more nutrients. It’s just a small detail, but that’s how we do it in my family.

    • Reinier Rotterdam, The Netherlands My profile page I'm a fan! joined 2/09
      Posted January 21st, 2012 at 3:15 pm | # |

      Thank you! The ketjap caramelizes the meatball a bit and makes it delicious. I’ll keep your tip in mind!

  7. Imre The Netherlands My profile page I'm a fan! joined 11/09
    Posted January 21st, 2012 at 10:59 am | # |

    Hi Reinier, your stamppot Andijvie looks great! It looks like you had a great time with Maangchi. Too bad I couldn’t make it to the Rotterdam Gapshida as well..
    Keep up the good work (cooking)!. :)

  8. Toto Bonn, Germany My profile page joined 6/10
    Posted January 21st, 2012 at 7:56 am | # |

    Oho :D Great.
    That is exactly the same way, we use to eat endive here in the Rhineland around Cologne in Germany (which is actually not far away from the Netherlands ;) ). But I really didn’t know that it is that famous.
    Thank you really much! :)


Leave a Reply

Views: