Recipes

Rice dessert drink

Sikhye 식혜

Sikhye is a traditional Korean beverage made with barley malt powder (yeotkiereum 엿기름) and rice. The taste is sweet and cold, with its own particular subtle flavor coming from barley malt. I love sikhye because of the flavor! Without the flavor, it will be like a bowl of sweet water and rice.

It’s known to help your digestion which is true for me! After eating lots of delicious food on festival days, I would drink sikhye for a dessert and for my digestion. I believe it cures my clogged stomach! : )

I am surprised by the fact that so many people have requested this beverage. I had thought Sikhye would be one of a few dishes not likable to people from another culture. This was my thought when I was requested this food for the first time: “Wha? Sikhye is popular to people from other cultures, too?”

I found that most people who requested this food had known about it. They say, “Maangchi, what’s the white drink served at a Korean restaurant? If you can, please post the recipe.”

“Whenever I go to my favorite Korean restaurant, they serve delicious cold rice drink, can I request the recipe?”

When I lived in Korea, one day I gave sikhye to my American friend. I remember what he said at that time after sipping a little sikhye. “oops! What is this!… it looks like cereal with sugar water and the taste is kinda weird!” : ) I thought it was very funny, I could put myself into his shoes. I may feel the same way if I taste something very new to me and I find it’s totally different from the taste that I expect!

Don’t expect the taste of a bowl of cereal with sugar water!

Here’s the recipe:

Ingredients:
A package of barley malt powder, 2 cups of rice, 2 cups of sugar (adjust to your taste), 24-30 cups of water, and pine nuts

Directions:

  1. Put 1 package of barley malted powder (1 pound) in a large basin and mix it with 24-30 cups of water. Let it sit for 2 hours until all the dregs are sunk to the bottom of the basin.3
  2. Make rice and set it aside.
    How to make rice using a pot:

    • Wash 2 cups of short grain rice. Drain and put in a pot with thick bottom.
    • Pour 1.5 cups of water into the pot. Soak it for an hour and close the lid.
    • Bring the pot to a boil over medium heat for 10 minutes.
    • Open the lid and turn the rice over with a rice scoop or spoon.
    • Simmer it over low heat for another 10 minutes! You will have nice fluffy rice!
  3. When the mixed liquid of barley malt powder and water is completely separated (it takes about 1.5 hours-2 hours), pour the clear liquid from the top into your rice cooker.
    *tip: if you have leftover clear liquid, save it and keep it in the refrigerator. We are going to use it later.
  4. Add 1 cup of sugar and the cooked rice.
  5. Stir it and set the rice cooker’s function to “warm” for 4- 5 hours. Be sure not to set it “cook.” The reason for setting it to “warm” is to ferment the rice so that the starch from the rice converts to sugar. If you boil it, the fermenting process will stop.
  6. Throw out the sediments sunk on the bottom of the basin.
  7. 4 hours later, check to see if the rice is fermented or not. When the rice is fermented, a few grains of rice will float to the top of liquid.
  8. Strain the rice and rinse it in cold water. Set it aside in a container. Add a little cold water and keep it in the refrigerator.
  9. Transfer the liquid from the rice cooker to a large pot, and add the saved leftover liquid from #3 if you have it.
  10. Add 1 cup of sugar and bring to a boil.
    * tip: you can add more water and sugar if you want.
  11. Remove the foam floating on the top of the boiling liquid.
  12. Cool it down and transfer it to a glass jar or bottle and keep it refrigerator.11
  13. To eat, serve it cold in a bowl with a scoop of rice from #8. Drop in a few pine nuts, just before serving it.
    * tip: you can add crushed ice made with sikhye liquid. If you like all your rice grains to float, add 1 tbs of sugar and mix it right before serving it.

2

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168 Comments:

  1. ashleele1989 Anaheim, California, USA My profile page joined 5/14
    Posted May 2nd, 2014 at 8:02 am | # |

    Hi Maangchi, thank you so so much for the great ( very thorough and clear) recipe for sikhye. I learnt about sikhye from your site and never hesitate to give it a try because of your detailing video clip. Before making my own sikhye, I have tried the drink from one of the best korean tofu house restaurant in my town called Kaju tofu house but their sikhye is really bad, overly sweet and all the rice sinks down to the bottom. I decided to make my own sikhye right after getting out of the restaurant. I followed your recipe carefully and try to read most of the comments to get more ideas about the drink. So, finally, i made it so successfully. I love to make my sikhye less sweet than usual so right before serving I can sprinkle a bit of sugar to the drink and then add the rice, amazingly all the rice float, i mean all of them float, none sinks down to the bottom. My sikhye has a unique aroma that i cannot describe, i believe the aroma comes from the barley malt and also the fermenting process with rice has made the smell more attractive. I love to cook korean food and i find your site’s recipes are great to try. I have made so far plenty dishes from your recipes. Thank you again for your great contribution

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted May 4th, 2014 at 11:44 am | # |

      It sounds like you made perfect shikhye! Yes, I like my shikhye less sweet with full malt flavor, too!
      “..right before serving I can sprinkle a bit of sugar to the drink and then add the rice, amazingly all the rice float,” yes, that’s right! Congratulations!

  2. sl100048 Singapore My profile page joined 6/11
    Posted December 22nd, 2013 at 9:16 pm | # |

    Hi Maangchi – I love your Shikhye recipe which is super easy. I am wondering how to make the cooked rice float a lot when serving as I tried twice which all cases the rice sank more than floating. Appreciate your advice on this. Have a great festive season.

    ps – I will be making this dessert for the New Year as my son is here from UK to spend time with us.

    Best, JY

  3. anastasialeehanbyul Seoul, South Korea My profile page joined 2/12
    Posted July 5th, 2013 at 4:32 am | # |

    Hi, Maangchi!
    Do you know by any chance exactly at what temperature should this mixture be kept to ferment successfully? I’m asking that because I found out that my rice cooker’s keep warm temperature is 70 C. This would be too high for making yogurt for example (I can adjust this temperature to 50 C). I was thinking that same applies in this case, and I need to lower the temperature, if I don’t maybe the rice won’t ferment properly. In any case I will try this recipe with lower temp first and see how it goes.

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted July 7th, 2013 at 1:53 pm | # |

      I have never measured the temperature when I made shikhey but I think I should do next time I make it again. Let me know about your experiment.

      • pink1e San Francisco My profile page joined 7/14
        Posted July 30th, 2014 at 6:47 pm | # |

        Other recipes say keep it between 50 – 60 ℃ (120 – 40 F)

  4. saigelee nunapitchuk My profile page joined 6/13
    Posted June 12th, 2013 at 6:01 am | # |

    I tried making this and it didn’t work. I followed the recipe but 5 hours later the rice didn’t float. what did I do wrong?

    • Poidog_HI Guam My profile page joined 3/13
      Posted June 16th, 2013 at 9:38 am | # |

      The first time I made Sikhye it came out just like in the video, using a Korean Malt Powder I purchased from ebay. However because the malt powder was expensive I looked for an inexpensive alternative, and used a US made malt powder meant for baking or home beer brewing. I experienced the same results; the rice would not float to the surface even after 6 hours. I am going to go back to the previous malt powder I used. I found another seller who sells the barley malt in its raw form but one package is $18US! I found in my local Korean super market “Barley Malt Tea” I wonder if I could use that instead?

  5. Jensung Taguig City, Philippines My profile page joined 6/13
    Posted June 3rd, 2013 at 12:43 pm | # |

    I love this dessert very much. I first tasted this drink at a popular Korean resto here in PH called Sariwon Korean Bbq and it was love at first “taste”. Hihi. I think the prep time requires a lot of time but I might try this when I have plenty of time. I saw this “instant sikhye mix” at a Korean Mart which cost around $5 and I might buy one this week. (^_^)

    Thanks Maangchi for your recipes. I am really a fan of everything about korea expecially the food. My officemate thinks that I am a Korean in a Filipina body. Hahaha. That’s funny and I think he’s right. (^_^)

  6. Poidog_HI Guam My profile page joined 3/13
    Posted March 25th, 2013 at 11:41 am | # |

    At our favorite Korean restaurant they serve the Rice drink as complimentary dessert, and seeing how my children loved this dessert I had to try it myself. WOW! I instantly liked it! I am so grateful you did an excellent job in making the video on how to make Sikhye. I was very intimidated in making the Rice drink, but following your video I was successful! Last night I made my first batch. It came out exactly how our favorite restaurant makes it! I can understand why you insist on using a pot with a thick metal bottom to cook the rice, I observed you don’t need to use too much heat to get fluffy rice. I prefer glass over plastic pitchers, but having 5 children makes glass pitchers a hazard. Can drinking Sikhye everyday be unhealthy for you? My wife thinks so because of the sugar content, what do you think?

    I tried the canned Sikhye and it tasted terrible! Nothing like homemade Rice Drink :-)

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted March 26th, 2013 at 12:27 pm | # |

      Wow I’m surprised and happy to hear that your children love the taste of shikhye because not many Korean children love it. : ) The only reason not to drink it everyday is because of the sugar. “I tried the canned Sikhye and it tasted terrible! Nothing like homemade Rice Drink” yes, that’s right!

      • Poidog_HI Guam My profile page joined 3/13
        Posted March 29th, 2013 at 3:25 am | # |

        This morning I went to the local Korean supermarket to look for Malt Powder, and found a package that said it was Malt Powder but the contents looked like Malt barley in its raw form, can I use this instead? Do I need to put it in a blender to get it down to fine powder?

  7. MeepKitty Florida My profile page joined 10/12
    Posted February 26th, 2013 at 8:35 pm | # |

    I love this drink. I make it for my boyfriend all the time and he drinks about a liter every 2 days!! It’s very important to let the fermentation process happen for at least 5 hours in my opinion. I once made it rushed, and only let the shiikhye to ferment for 3.5 hours and it tasted so bland!!! Thank you for the recipe Maangchi!! :) I would have never discovered how to make that can drink I spent like a dollar per a can for!!

  8. swiedom saratoga springs My profile page joined 5/12
    Posted May 19th, 2012 at 10:05 pm | # |

    Doesn’t boiling the liquid in the end kill any beneficial bacteria in the drink? Thanks so much!!!

  9. SueBear84 Annandale My profile page joined 11/11
    Posted November 16th, 2011 at 1:34 pm | # |

    Hello~~~..
    I know this question sounds silly but what is Malted Bailey Powder in Korean~?…

    Thank you.

  10. Xuxu China My profile page joined 10/11
    Posted October 7th, 2011 at 9:54 am | # |

    Hi Maangchi, I’m so excited to try this recipe but I don’t have rice cooker :( Can I just boil it in a pot? Thank you!

  11. sl100048 Singapore My profile page joined 6/11
    Posted August 9th, 2011 at 11:13 pm | # |

    Hi Maangchi,
    I personally LOVE shihye which I have indulged from my youth..
    Now I need to hand down the beautiful taste to my children. I would like to ask you why you put only 1 cup of rice into the malt power water instead of all cooked rice? Is there any reasons behind and can I put all of them at one go? Thanks for your reply. JY

  12. AgnetaloveK Sweden My profile page joined 6/11
    Posted June 30th, 2011 at 2:18 pm | # |

    Hello
    I have a few questions

    1) Do you know if Barely malted powder is like the stuff Chinese use for their sikhye?

    2)After cooking the rice(before fermenting it) should the rice still be a little bit hard to chew on?

    3)After I fermented the rice the water tasted like rice water and I didn’t sense anything special with the smell. What did I do wrong during this process?

    • Poidog_HI Guam My profile page joined 3/13
      Posted March 29th, 2013 at 3:15 am | # |

      I used the Chinese Malt Powder for this recipe and it came out great!

  13. dragon_hi Honolulu My profile page joined 6/11
    Posted June 28th, 2011 at 5:30 am | # |

    Aloha Maangchi,
    I made the rice drink today and it turn out good, only when I add sugar in I’m not sure what the taste of the drink. Is it suppose taste little bit sweet? And the drink can last for how long when I put in refridgerator? Mahalo

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted June 28th, 2011 at 8:31 am | # |

      Aloha! : )
      yes, it is supposed to be a little sweet. You can keep it for 4-7 days in the fridge. Don’t forget it will still ferment in the fridge. I usually finish eating it in a few days after making.

  14. jemalah Canada My profile page joined 6/11
    Posted June 17th, 2011 at 12:15 am | # |

    hi maangchi

    thanks for your generous heart!!!!
    i am trying to reduce refined (white/brown) sugar as much as possible….so…for the sikhae…can we use honey or agave nectar or maple syrup…etc…or even raw sugar?

    thank you!!!
    p.s. same question for other korean dishes requiring white/brown sugar

  15. mokpochica Michigan My profile page I'm a fan! joined 1/09
    Posted April 8th, 2011 at 3:08 pm | # |

    I am so happy right now having two large containers of shikhye in my fridge. It is delicious and a hit with everyone. Maybe after the kids are asleep tonight I will take a nice hot shower, make a funny towel hat for myself and then drink a big glass of shikhye so I can pretend I am at a jjimjilbang.

  16. Toto Bonn, Germany My profile page joined 6/10
    Posted October 17th, 2010 at 2:17 pm | # |

    I can just pour 6 cups of water in my rice cooker. is it enough for sikhye when I use it or should I use a bigger basin?

  17. Marisol Malaysia My profile page joined 8/10
    Posted September 19th, 2010 at 8:15 pm | # |

    This morning I checked my sikhye, it seems done and smell good also, now I already boil it and waiting for the sikhye to turn cool and put in refrigerator, after fermented some of the rice will float on the surface of sikhye,the taste of the rice also good. I am using brown sugar so the colour of the sikhye a little bit brownish than what you display on website video. Thanks Maangchi.

    • joeyng89 Malaysia My profile page joined 1/11
      Posted March 22nd, 2011 at 1:12 pm | # |

      ahh~ Marisol i see u’re from Malaysia too? can i know where did u get the barley malt powder? :)

  18. Marisol Malaysia My profile page joined 8/10
    Posted September 19th, 2010 at 11:51 am | # |

    Dear Maangchi,
    I am fermenting the barley malt powder water with sugar and cooked rice
    on the electrical stove, I hope it will success. Thanks so much for the recipe, cann’t wait to try the drink.

  19. Arakaki California My profile page joined 9/10
    Posted September 18th, 2010 at 1:26 pm | # |

    I am new to your site and love it!!! I tried sikhye in a korean restaurant..<3 it!! It had a ginger flavor which was good.

    I'm in the process of fermenting my rice with the barley water. I'm sure I'll be making this again. To save time, can I make and store my clear malted water in the refrigerator the day before?

    Thanks so much…

  20. chocostarrr My profile page joined 7/10
    Posted July 25th, 2010 at 11:46 pm | # |

    that looks delicious~!
    how long did it take you to make that though?

  21. carlam My profile page joined 7/10
    Posted July 21st, 2010 at 5:17 pm | # |

    Can this recipe be made with Brown Short Grain rice??

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted July 23rd, 2010 at 4:14 pm | # |

      I would use white rice.

    • jlove212 United States My profile page joined 11/12
      Posted November 4th, 2012 at 1:43 am | # |

      brown rice is rice with the skin still on it so it would make the rice a little course instead of soggy like its supposed to be. it would also make it a little harder to chew
      ^ ( sorry for the lack of better words)

  22. Toto Bonn, Germany My profile page joined 6/10
    Posted July 15th, 2010 at 5:06 pm | # |

    Hi Maangchi!
    I really love this drink. I got it just ready at a Korean Store. Unfortunately I can`t find the malt powder so I wanted to ask whether I can just use Boricha (Barley tea) and grind it or would that be a bad idea?
    Thank you

  23. monivela My profile page joined 12/09
    Posted June 28th, 2010 at 8:51 pm | # |

    Hi Maangchi…

    I had this drink after a Korean dinner at a restaurant, they called it “rice punch” I believe it was the same. I noticed the flavor of ginger in the drink and really enjoyed the ginger flavor added to the drink.

    At what point can I add the ginger? Perhaps when the mixture is on the stove top to cook the ginger?

    Thank you for your assistance….

    ~Moni

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted June 29th, 2010 at 1:23 pm | # |

      Moni,
      If you want to add ginger, add it right before step 10.

      Step 10: Add 1 cup of sugar and bring to a boil.

  24. FK07 My profile page joined 6/10
    Posted June 8th, 2010 at 12:58 am | # |

    I bought the Malted Bailey Powder in US and I made the rice drink successfully. Thank you very much for your recipe.

    Now I’m in my country, Vietnam. I went to the Korean market, they said they didnt have that powder. However, they have other package to make the rice drink. It looks like the bailey or rice seeds, but I dont know how to make it :(
    Can you help me?
    Thanks a lot.

  25. Aislinn21 Boise, ID My profile page joined 5/10
    Posted May 14th, 2010 at 6:21 pm | # |

    Help!
    I dont think my rice cooker is big enough.
    Can I reuse the rice or is there a different way to do this?

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted May 15th, 2010 at 11:35 am | # |

      yes,it’s possible to make shikhye without using a rice cooker, especially when you make large quantities.

      Keep it on the stove with low heat and when it reaches hot temperature (more than 40 Celsius), turn the heat off. Then reheat it again when it cools down (about 30 Celsius).

      You will have to keep an eye on it. Don’t let it boil over. If it’s too hot, the rice grains in shikhye will not be fermented.

      Good luck with your shikhye making!!

  26. aqua My profile page joined 3/10
    Posted April 23rd, 2010 at 8:37 pm | # |

    Hi! So I finally decided to make this and I bought a package similar to yours that said “malt flour (fine)” but what I found was that it was not flour-like and had more coarse pieces in it. As a result, when I added the water, it did not look like what you had. Here are two pictures: (did I buy the wrong package ?)
    http://i42.tinypic.com/13yj978.jpg
    http://i42.tinypic.com/2dgmbeg.jpg

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted April 23rd, 2010 at 8:52 pm | # |

      yeah, the package says it’s fine malt powder but it looks coarse in the second photo. Don’t worry much about it. It’s just wrong translation.
      Follow the directions in the recipe, then you will make good shikhye! : )
      Put the mixture of water and coarse barley malt flakes into a strainer and wait for water to drain out. Throw away the stuff in the strainer. Then wait until the fine sediments are sunk on the bottom. You need only clear water to make shikhye.

  27. Brian_Montoya Colorado Springs,Colorado My profile page joined 12/09
    Posted March 24th, 2010 at 9:24 pm | # |

    this is probably a stupid question, but is it possible to make shikye without a rice cooker?

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted March 25th, 2010 at 1:04 pm | # |

      Of course it’s possible to make shikhye without using a rice cooker, especially when you make large quantities.
      Keep in mind only one thing keep the temperature warm about 40 Celsius. If it’s too hot, the rice grains in shikhye will not be fermented.

      • Brian_Montoya Colorado Springs,Colorado My profile page joined 12/09
        Posted March 25th, 2010 at 9:56 pm | # |

        so should i just keep it on the stove with the heat barely on and keep checking the temp.?

        oh, and btw, thanks so much for your reply hon, i love your recipes, especially your kimchi, its simply the best, ive tried so many other recipes and none of them are as good or as easy to make, it comes out perfect everytime!!

        • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
          Posted March 26th, 2010 at 8:18 am | # |

          yes, you are right.
          Keep it on the stove with low heat and when it reaches hot temperature (more than 40 Celsius), turn the heat off. Then reheat it again when it cools down (about 30 Celsius)
          You will have to keep an eye on it. Don’t let it boil over.
          Good luck with your shikhye making!!

  28. domesticjoy My profile page joined 3/10
    Posted March 12th, 2010 at 4:04 am | # |

    Wow, wonderful delicious sihkye, mine came out delicious! I have been enjoying it nightly for dessert, I love the malted barley flavor, and the sweetness with the ice cubes floating in it. I’m making another batch right now for my nieces, they are going to LOVE it as a drink to go with their salty snacks while they study. So much better than the canned stuff, thanks Maangchi for making this video and recipe available for me to make it!

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted March 13th, 2010 at 1:52 am | # |

      Congratulation! “the sweetness with the ice cubes floating in it”, ooh, it sounds very delicious and cool!

  29. aqua My profile page joined 3/10
    Posted March 9th, 2010 at 11:22 pm | # |

    Hi maangchi!

    I recently had some cereal drink my korean friend gave me, however, I don’t think it is sikhye. Can you confirm what this drink is and whether the process of making it is similar? http://www.wjfood.com/beverage/morningrice.asp

    Thanks!

  30. lady_nesa Chicago My profile page joined 3/10
    Posted March 8th, 2010 at 1:39 am | # |

    Hi there Maangchi!~
    I was wondering,
    about a year ago I visited Korea for the first time, and the family I stayed with took me to a beautiful restaurant. It seemed very unique in that it had traditional sliding doors, underground heating, and each room led outside instead of being one big building. They served a really delicious drink in a wooden cup that tasted sweet & had rice in it, but was room temperature(maybe because it was cold at night?). Could this have been sikhye or a different drink altogether?
    Thank you so much!~ :]

  31. leeemur SF Bay Area My profile page joined 7/09
    Posted January 24th, 2010 at 2:08 am | # |

    I love shikhye, but it’s so time consuming to make…
    I bought some bottled shikhye and canned shikhye from the supermarket, but it didn’t taste as good as the homemade ones… so I finally found time to make this and it is so worth it!!! So good and refreshing!! Thank you maangchi!

  32. lily5377
    Posted December 26th, 2009 at 12:09 am | # |

    Hi Maangchi, you are the best. I’ve followed your recipe for the sikhye and it was so sucessful, I have some questions, yesterday i asked my brother to buy the malted powder and the rice from the Korean Supermarket, but he bought me the malted powder(i guess you know which one i’m talking about) which is not ground and he got me the sweet rice. can I use the sweet rice instead of the regular one? and can i use the malted powder which’s not ground?? Thanks for your help

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted December 26th, 2009 at 9:29 am | # |

      yes, you can use either malted powder or crushed malted flakes.
      And sweet rice (glutinous rice) is used to make shikhye,too.
      Thank you very much!

    • lily5377
      Posted December 26th, 2009 at 3:47 pm | # |

      you are so kind, thank you very much and have a happy new year

  33. Jenny
    Posted December 13th, 2009 at 8:40 pm | # |

    Hi Maangchi!
    Love all your videos…they’re very helpful.
    Sikhye is one of my all time favorite drink. I’m going try to make it but I have a few questions. Instead of cooking the rice the traditional way to make sikhye, can I cook the rice in a rice cooker? Can I refrigerate the rice together with the drink instead of refrigerating them separately? Also, if I want a darker color drink and stronger taste, would I use more malt powder and less water? Thank you!

    Jenny

    P.S. love your blog. Your backpacking story is inspirational…I would like to do that one day! ^_^

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted December 14th, 2009 at 1:32 am | # |

      1.Yes, you can use your rice cooker to make rice for shikhye, but use less water than usual rice making. Rice grains should not be mushy.

      2.Yes, you don’t have to separate rice grains from the shikhye juice before keeping in the refrigerator.

      3. no, you don’t have to. The ratio of the ingredients for this recipe will make strong flavor of shikhye. If it’s too strong, you and add more water and sugar.

  34. Sofie
    Posted November 24th, 2009 at 2:14 pm | # |

    I finally made sikhye and it turned out great! Some minor adjustments on my part is cutting down some sugar and I had to strain the liquid at the end because there was still some starch floating around. Like Kim, my sikhye was more of a light tea color, but I don’t care because it tasted delicious! Thanks so much for sharing your recipes Maanchi! :) When it’s the right season for my market to stock on dried persimmons, I really want to try your Sujunggwa recipe next!

  35. Ally
    Posted November 18th, 2009 at 4:42 pm | # |

    Is there a difference between Pearl Barley Powder and Malt Barley Powder?

    • Sofie
      Posted November 24th, 2009 at 2:33 pm | # |

      Yes, because pearl barley powder has a different taste than malt barley powder. You need that malt flavor from the malt barley powder/flour. It’s a MUST to have the correct ingredients and to follow Maangchi’s recipe exactly because that’s how I successfully made mine. Good luck!

  36. Kim
    Posted October 31st, 2009 at 9:30 am | # |

    Hi Maangchi,

    I tried using the whole package of the barley flour and used 13 cups of water. When I looked at it, it didn’t look like the color in your video. It had an orangeish color.

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted October 31st, 2009 at 11:15 am | # |

      You did not follow the recipe! : )
      As you see in the recipe, about 24- 30 cups of water is needed. Don’t give up making good shikhye. If you like to use 13 cups water, use about 1/3 amount barley malt powder.

      • Kim
        Posted October 31st, 2009 at 9:36 pm | # |

        I tried again and used 1/2 of the barley malt powder and 12 cups but it still had the same color.

  37. Lily :D
    Posted October 19th, 2009 at 7:08 pm | # |

    Thank you so much, mine came out well, i only fermented it for 3 hours. but liek after iput it in the fridge and overnight there was like a little bit of powdery residue on the bottom should i leave that out of my drink or shake it?

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted October 19th, 2009 at 7:39 pm | # |

      No problem!
      When you serve it, stir it with a ladle before scooping it into a serving bowl.

  38. Amy
    Posted October 14th, 2009 at 7:52 pm | # |

    If I were to cut the recipe in half, would the times differ? I don’t want to make a HUGE amount and have it go to waste because I’m making this really for myself. Definitely do not think I can drink ALL of it within 7 days. =/ Thanks! Looking forward to trying the recipe out!

  39. Eleana
    Posted October 10th, 2009 at 12:47 am | # |

    hi maangchi

    for this recipe, are we suppose to use malt flour or malt powder? I’m planning to buy it online but I’m not sure which one to buy.

  40. person
    Posted October 5th, 2009 at 4:48 pm | # |

    im doing a project on north korea for my school. im so glad i found your recipe. i googled north korean dishes but i couldnt find much of anything that was not a good easyish recipe. thanks.

  41. victoria truong
    Posted September 29th, 2009 at 10:14 pm | # |

    Hi I am 12 years old and me and my boyfriend was making this for our mothers it turn out pretty good but it was sour in the begging and sweet in the end of the taste,, is that suppose to happen?? WE woke up around 6am and we got done around 3 or 4 Y does it take so long to make it. Can we buy this desert anywhere? in San Francisco.

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted September 29th, 2009 at 10:56 pm | # |

      When you ferment it too long, it goes sour. Follow the recipe exactly. You can buy canned shikhye at a Korean store.

  42. Kay
    Posted September 26th, 2009 at 5:00 am | # |

    Dear maanchi onni,
    Thanks for your recipes again and today I am making jangjorim, oiji muchim and shikhye.
    I am still waiting for my barley malted power to sink down in the water and then I will ferment it with rice in the cooker.
    Can’t wait to taste it.
    Jangjorim and oiji were successful.
    Thank you so much again.
    From singapre
    Kay

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted September 26th, 2009 at 5:59 am | # |

      wow,jangjorim and oiji muchim with rice, then shikhye for dessert, perfect! You made oijangajji! Cool! Email me the photos of them if you can. I would like to see them. : )
      Let me know how your shikhye turns out. Thank you!

      Jangjorim:
      http://www.maangchi.com/recipe/jangjorim

      oijangajji:
      http://www.maangchi.com/recipe/oijangajji

      shikhye:
      http://www.maangchi.com/recipe/sikhye

      • Kay
        Posted September 30th, 2009 at 11:25 am | # |

        Dear Maangchi onni,

        I tried my Shikhye with brown sugar as I do not use any white sugar and it seems the taste is not exactly same as what I expected. Also, I did have a problem with fermenting it as my rice cooker is a medium sized one ( max 5 cups of rice) so I could not transfer all the barley mated powder water into the rice cooker but I had to leave quite a bit in a sauce pan. After the fermenting process, I poured the fermented liquid into this remainder and boiled it with some sugar.
        I only used 400g which was my original package.
        Rice was nice and fluffy and I reduced the quantity as well. I really enjoyed the burnt rice! I have not had it for a long time and it was just perfect!
        I will try it next time and will post it again.
        Thank you!
        Kind regards
        Kay
        P.S.where can I attach my photos please?

  43. Jane
    Posted September 21st, 2009 at 5:27 pm | # |

    Maangchi ssi,

    You are a GENIUS!!! OF COURSE! Sikhye water for crushed ice! EXCELLENT!!!!

    I noticed that this is how ALL the good jjim jil bangs (Korean bath houses) in Korea prepare and serve their shikhye. The sikhye ice is so delicious, refreshing, and very flat, just the way you made your ice.

    Thank you for this very important and detailed tip!

    Jane

  44. Jane
    Posted September 21st, 2009 at 5:14 pm | # |

    Hi Maangchi-ssi,

    It’s Jane again! Guess what? My mom and I made sikhye 2x this month with our similar recipes. It is so delicious, and definitely aids in digestion as you mentioned :-)

    We also made yakshik last night with raisins, pine nuts, jujubes, and chestnuts. I didn’t see yakshik in your list – is it something you are going to post later on? I think it would be great!

    Filming yakshik with a camera may be a little hard just because of all the heavy steaming and lifting though. Hahaha…hope to see how you make your yakshik so we can compare notes ^_^

    Jane

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted September 21st, 2009 at 11:16 pm | # |

      sure, my yakshik recipe will be included in the list of my upcoming recipes. Thank you!

  45. jennifer
    Posted September 19th, 2009 at 4:58 pm | # |

    maanchi,
    was curious to know where you bought the rectangula pitchers

    • jennifer
      Posted September 25th, 2009 at 8:02 pm | # |

      never mind. lady from e2se.org already told me where to buy those pitchers(bed bath & beyond). made your shikhye and e2se’s homemade soymilk. both with great results. i just wanted to store the drinks in glass pitchers.

      • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
        Posted September 25th, 2009 at 9:42 pm | # |

        I’m glad to hear that you know where to buy the glass pitchers. My friend gave me the glass pitchers.

  46. Mai
    Posted September 10th, 2009 at 1:46 am | # |

    I just discovered your channel on YouTube by chance and I’m very glad I did! I haven’t tried the recipes yet but from all the wonderful comments, I can tell they will be yummy! Thanks for posting all of these recipes! I’m not Korean so I don’t have the opportunity to learn Korean recipes from my family. I have wondered how to make sikhae since I had the stuff in the can. THANK YOU!!

  47. nina
    Posted September 9th, 2009 at 1:14 am | # |

    dear maangchi. i love your website :) i just want to know about shikye storage. how long can you keep the shikye in the refrigerator. does it have a time limit?
    thanks

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted September 9th, 2009 at 9:11 pm | # |

      Shikye won’t go bad but it will become sour over time because it will keep fermenting in the refrigerator. I think it will be ok up to 7 days if you keep it in the refrigerator.

  48. NK
    Posted August 25th, 2009 at 3:28 pm | # |

    Hi Maangchi,

    Thanks so much for this site. My mom tried to teach me to make Korean food but I just had a hard time learning from her. I just didn’t get it because she doesn’t use measurements. But thanks to the way you break it down, you make it look so easy.

    Wondering about the 식혜’s rice. My mom uses 찹쌀(sweet rice). Does the recipe change if I use that instead? Thanks!

  49. Coco
    Posted August 11th, 2009 at 9:02 pm | # |

    Dear Maangchi,

    I forgot to put sugar into the warm pot with the barley malt liquid for the fermenting process. Is the rice still usable? Can I add sugar into the liquid while boilin????? Thank you so much for the recipe. You are the best cook :D.

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted August 12th, 2009 at 9:14 am | # |

      Sorry about late reply! I was very busy yesterday afternoon. I hope you did not throw it away. Of course it’s ok without sugar. You can add sugar anytime.

  50. Lennie
    Posted July 27th, 2009 at 3:55 pm | # |

    omg i luv this recipe XXD but 1 thing i find difficult how do u cook rice on a pot instead of a rice cooker till its fluffy??o.o btw thnx again for the vid!=D

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted July 27th, 2009 at 9:52 pm | # |

      yeah, as I posted in the video, make rice this way using a pot.
      How to make rice using a pot:

      * Wash 2 cups of short grain rice. Drain and put in a pot with thick bottom.
      * Pour 1.5 cups of water into the pot. Soak it for an hour and close the lid.
      * Bring the pot to a boil over medium heat for 10 minutes.
      * Open the lid and turn the rice over with a rice scoop or spoon.
      * Simmer it over low heat for another 10 minutes! You will have nice fluffy rice!

  51. Kathy
    Posted July 10th, 2009 at 9:45 am | # |

    Hi Maangchi,

    Thank you so much for all these recipes. The videos really help a lot. Is it OK to store the rice and the drink together in the same container?

    Thanks again!

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted July 10th, 2009 at 4:18 pm | # |

      Yes, it will be ok if you eat it in a few days. However, be aware that rice keeps fermenting when it’s not separated from the juice. So the color of your rice punch will change and might not be clear and grayish.

  52. Ellen
    Posted July 9th, 2009 at 3:33 pm | # |

    Maangchi,

    Thank you so much for all your hard work on this website! It is such a fantastic resource. I just finished making sikhye for my parents and it tastes delicious. I’m excited to try your other recipes!

    Thanks,
    ES

  53. Jung-Suk Ryu
    Posted July 1st, 2009 at 12:34 pm | # |

    Greetings from Ottawa. My girlfriend and I always use your site to cook something new and exciting. My friends and colleagues think that I am the best cook ever! Please keep it up! JS

  54. Cecile
    Posted June 28th, 2009 at 11:31 pm | # |

    hi Maangchi,
    Wow this dessert looks so oriental and special,too. I have a question. I’ve never seen barley malt in the market, but only had a glimpse of whole grain barley once. Does there exist any difference between them? Or may I substitute this simply with ground barley? I wonder how it might turn out. Thank you so much for reading this.
    best regards from Cecile

  55. inung
    Posted June 21st, 2009 at 8:41 am | # |

    hi maangchi,

    i always follow your recipes, n cant wait for more. i want to try this sikhye recipes. it looks tasty and refreshing the hot day. but I’m curious about one thing, for it’s being fermented, does it contain alcohol (i dont consume alcohol)? thanks maangchi! btw, is there any chance you will visit singapore or indonesia and do meet up? i would love to meet you there.

  56. linda
    Posted June 20th, 2009 at 4:23 pm | # |

    hi maangchi,
    just wanted to thank you for taking the time to post all these wonderful recipes!

    i made your sikhye and followed your directions to the tee. for me the rice started floated to the top a little after 2 hours which is alot less than the 4-5 hour you said. does that mean it’s done? and i should take it out? i don’t want to cook too long either.

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted June 20th, 2009 at 8:39 pm | # |

      I don’t know the answer because I have never seen that rice was floating after 2 hours. Rice fermentation usually starts at least 4 hours after. how did you like it? Did it turn out delicious? Did you use your rice cooker? If the taste is ok, it will be ok. That’s all I can say.

  57. Carmen
    Posted June 14th, 2009 at 8:18 pm | # |

    Greetings from Germany, Maangchi!

    Ok, 3 questions:
    Can I use maltose instead of malt powder?
    If yes, then how about the amount?
    Can I use a “thermo pot” for the fermentation process?
    It(the pot) is huge and just screaming “I can do the job!”. ^o^

    We only use that pot for keeping soups hot,so I think it would be at least 60°C?

    Actually I’m Chinese. Not that they sell thermo pots in Germany °o°

    Thanks for all your recipes!

  58. Liyun
    Posted June 1st, 2009 at 9:16 pm | # |

    hi maangchi! i just bought 엿기름, but it’s different from the one you used.. yours is 엿기름가루, like powder, while mine is like, husk? can i still use it with your recipe?

  59. rv65
    Posted May 29th, 2009 at 2:57 am | # |

    How big is your rice cooker and what kind is it? I would like to eventually get one to make sikhye. Any response would be great.

  60. Dominique Echard
    Posted May 24th, 2009 at 4:35 pm | # |

    Hello Maangchi,

    I stumbled across your kimchi recipe on You Tube and thought you were a great teacher. Asian cuisine has always been a love of mine and it is so fun trying new techniques and ingredients. From You Tube I found this site and I bookmarked it immediately. Kimchi has never appealed to me in the past because I am a spice wimp but now that I am older and tastes have changed I want to try your recipe. Thank you so much for sharing yourself with all of us. I am a cook also, writing a vegan cookbook, and know how much work it is to do what you are doing. You have a great camera personality, too! Keep up the great work, I can’t wait to try everything I can :D

    Dominique

  61. Anonymous
    Posted May 22nd, 2009 at 7:00 am | # |

    I wanted to thank you for this recipe. It brought back bitter sweet memories of my mom. My mom was a great cook who did not write down her recipes. So finding this recipe and making the drink brought back memories of my childhood. More importantly, my daughter and I were able to share fond memories of my mom.

  62. Anonymous
    Posted May 13th, 2009 at 4:04 pm | # |

    Thank you for posting these recipes and videos! I can’t wait to go try it now. :)

  63. yan
    Posted May 6th, 2009 at 4:53 pm | # |

    Hi Maangchi
    Thanks its was good and my friend enjoy it as well,her little one keep asking for more..
    thanks

  64. Ataciara
    Posted April 22nd, 2009 at 1:24 pm | # |

    I love shikhae!! ^^ I can’t wait to try this recipe~ it looks so delicious~~

    • yan
      Posted May 5th, 2009 at 1:19 pm | # |

      Hi Maangchi,
      I am trying to mack it to day hope its come out good as your
      thanks for teaching..i just love your recipe,i have try more than one of your recipe they all came out good.keep up the good work.

  65. Nancy
    Posted April 4th, 2009 at 5:58 pm | # |

    I forgot to ask if I don’t use my fermented rice in my drink, could I reuseuse the fermented rice next time when I make the rice drink? Thanks.

  66. Nancy
    Posted April 4th, 2009 at 5:54 pm | # |

    Thank you so much for teaching us how to make the rice drink. This is what I have been looking for for 14 years. When I was pregnant, I felt nauseous all the time and one day, my husband took me to a Korean restaurant that gave me a glass of this rice drink and I could drink it just fine. I felt so good drinking it that it made an impression on me. Later on I did some research trying to learn how to make this drink but could not. I had a Korean friend that kind understood what I describe and made some for me after I deliver my baby. It tasted good but not quite as the same. May be it did not have enough of the delicate sour taste like I remembered. I am tryiing to make today but thought that may be I should drop a note to let you know how grateful I am. I have a thermal cooker, so, I will try to keep it in my thermal cooker and see if it works as well. Thank you for letting us know the temperature should be around 60C.

  67. Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
    Posted March 30th, 2009 at 5:21 pm | # |

    Kim,
    Your mother must be good at cooking!
    Yes, you can use brown rice, too.

  68. Kim
    Posted March 30th, 2009 at 6:49 am | # |

    Maangchi my mother use to serve this drink when I was a little child.I never got the chance to learn any of the Korean recipes from her so this means alot to me, Thank you soooo much for the chance to learn them. Her name is Chong, I was wondering can you use brown rice instead of white rice? You are wonderful and I love your recipes. Keep up the good work and I hope good fortune and blessings for you. Kim

  69. Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
    Posted March 28th, 2009 at 11:00 am | # |

    Flower,
    Interesting! The one made with pineapple juice sounds good to me, too! : )

  70. Flower Venezuela My profile page I'm a fan! joined 3/09
    Posted March 27th, 2009 at 6:12 pm | # |

    Hi Maangchi, You may be surprised to know that in my country Venezuela, we have three types of beverages made with rice. is chicha is a milk-based, another is made with fermented pineapple water this is my favorite, and something very similar to this that you prepare which is usually given to babies to drink to cool in hot weather or any illness or bad digestion problems, I also like this so much that is fresh.

  71. Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
    Posted March 24th, 2009 at 9:41 pm | # |

    gabieolie,
    wow, congratulation! You made it!
    I see you made a lot of effort.
    Spicy pork bbq recipe will be posted someday.

  72. gabieolie
    Posted March 24th, 2009 at 7:31 pm | # |

    Hi Maangchi,

    The sikhye turned out really good! I spent a lot of time straining the liquid because I like clear sikhye : ) I used coffee filter instead of paper towel to strain the liquid. My family loved it, too. Thank you for another great recipe! BTW, when are you going post the recipe for spicy pork bbq? I’ll be waiting!

  73. Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
    Posted March 22nd, 2009 at 8:02 am | # |

    Gabieolie
    yes, adding dried anchovies to non-spicy kongnamulguk is even better! The reason I did not use dried anchovies for the recipe was to make vegetarian soup. Yeah, I see almost 87 percent of voters have preferred spicy kongnamulguk so far, but 17 percent voters like non-spicy version!

  74. Gabieolie
    Posted March 21st, 2009 at 11:16 pm | # |

    Hi Maangchi,
    Thank you always for promptly answering all of our questions. I’m going to borrow a bigger rice cooker to make sikhye. I going to make kongnamul soup and kongnamul side dish, too. I prefer the non-spicy soup. I think I’m a minority on this since your voters seem to favor the spicy version. I was wondering, can I put anchovies in the non-spicy soup, too? I’m not a vegetarian, so I just want the best flavor possible. : ) Thank you!

  75. Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
    Posted March 21st, 2009 at 9:42 pm | # |

    gabieolie,
    yes, you can make rice using your rice cooker. Your rice cooker is for 5 cups? I don’t think it’s a good idea of making sikhye with the rice cooker unless you make 4-5 cups sikhye. ; )

  76. gabieolie
    Posted March 21st, 2009 at 5:56 pm | # |

    Hi Maangchi,

    I’m about to make your sikhye recipe. I still have couple of questions: 1. can make the rice in my rice cooker? 2. my rice cooker is not as big as yours – it says 5 cups – does it mean that I have to cut the recipe in half or do I just follow the recipe as is? Thank you for answering my questions.

  77. Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
    Posted March 21st, 2009 at 12:28 am | # |

    gabieolie,
    oh, that means after you ferment the rice, I said, you should keep it in the refrigerator. When you serve sikhye, put some sikhye juice in a bowl and some rice. At that time if you want your all rice grains float on the top of sikhye juice, add a little bit of sugar and mix it. Then you will see all rice grains will be floating.

  78. gabieolie
    Posted March 20th, 2009 at 11:27 pm | # |

    Hi Maangchi,

    I’m going to try to make sikhye tomorrow, but I don’t understand your last tip – “If you like all your rice grains to float, add 1 tbs of sugar and mix it right before serving it.” Do I mix the sugar with rice and then add to the sikhye water or do I add the sugar to sikhye water and then add the rice? I like my sikhye with floating rice : ) Thank you for the recipe!

  79. Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
    Posted March 4th, 2009 at 7:44 pm | # |

    linda,
    If it tastes sour, it means the sikhye is too fermented.

  80. linda
    Posted March 4th, 2009 at 5:15 pm | # |

    hello maangchi~

    so i tried the oven and it did ferment. however, my recent batch came out tasting “sshi uh” or sour. I did leave it ferment about an hour or so more than four hours so that might have an affect? Or i closed the top of my pot when i was fermenting it? I don’t know but i threw it away and starting a new batch today. I’ll tell you how it goes in my oven~

  81. Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
    Posted March 3rd, 2009 at 12:36 am | # |

    Christina,
    no, sikhye does not contain alcohol.

  82. Christina
    Posted March 2nd, 2009 at 12:28 pm | # |

    Hi Maangchi,

    Thanks for sharing your wonderful recipes. I tested few of your recipes and it tasted wonderful.
    I love Sikhye and I have one question about it. Does it contain any alcohol after it is fermented? Is it the same as chinese rice wine?
    I’m pregnant with a child now but at the same time would love to try this recipe. Thank you for all your hard work.

  83. Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
    Posted March 2nd, 2009 at 8:17 am | # |

    Linda,
    You can use sweet rice for sikhye. Some people use sweet rice to make sikhye.

    I have never used my oven to make sikhye, but I think fermenting sikhye using an oven is a brilliant idea. Why not! You must be a very smart person! But the temperature should set under 60 degrees Celsius. Let me know the result. If it works well, we should share this precious tip with others. : )

    Yes, whole fermenting process is important for rice and barley malt water. If you want to discuss this more, please leave your question here http://www.maangchi.com/talk/forum/general-discussion

  84. Linda
    Posted March 2nd, 2009 at 1:53 am | # |

    Thanks for the recipe~! I was wondering if there was a difference in using short grain rice or sweet rice (chap sal).

    Also, my rice cooker only does 3.5 cups at a time. So can I just ferment the rice in the oven at 140 degrees farenheit (which is 60 degrees celsius) or should I just set a pot on low? Last time I made this, I just fermented the rice with as much liquid I could fit into my rice cooker and felt it came out fine. I just wanted to know if I was doing it wrong.

    Last question: The whole fermenting process is important for the rice only or also for the malt water?

    Thanks for your help~ Linda

  85. Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
    Posted February 26th, 2009 at 9:34 am | # |

    Natalie,
    Wonderful! I think you will make sikhye very often from now. : ) You must be missing your grandmother!

  86. Natalie
    Posted February 26th, 2009 at 1:07 am | # |

    Maangchi,
    You don’t know how ECSTATIC I was when I saw this recipe! THANK YOU, THANK YOU, THANK YOU!!! I can’t wait to try it! My grandma used to make this for me on my birthdays because it was my favorite. Unfortunately, I never asked her to teach me. I also craved this when I was pregnant but the canned ones were just not the same. You’re the greatest!

  87. Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
    Posted February 21st, 2009 at 10:58 pm | # |

    deborah,
    I don’t know much about it.
    You can leave your message on the forum to discuss it if you want. Someone else may give you better answer.

    Sikhye will never be fermented at room temperature. Pleasee follow the recipe. The temperature should be 60 degree celsius

  88. deborah Toronto, ON My profile page I'm a fan! joined 4/09
    Posted February 21st, 2009 at 1:16 pm | # |

    maangchi,
    i guess with the different types of sweetner, it would be up to us to adjust the level of sweetness. i would have thought that there must be some type of sugar because how else would the mix ferment? maybe i’m wrong?

    how long do you suggest to let it ferment at around room temperature? i wouldn’t know when it would be done…

    thanks again!

  89. MounTurtle
    Posted February 21st, 2009 at 11:14 am | # |

    hey! was surfing the net and came across your youtube… heex… i actually went to find de barley malt powder in the korean mart near my house and i failed! oh i’m staying in singapore btw… they only keep in cans… T_T
    have nv tried sikhye before but u made it look so yummy tats why i wanted to try making it myself!

  90. Jeanie
    Posted February 21st, 2009 at 10:12 am | # |

    THANK YOU SOOO MUCH MAANCHI! It’s a lot of work involved but definately worth it at the end!

  91. Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
    Posted February 13th, 2009 at 5:33 pm | # |

    Lisa,
    I usually finish eating this amount in the recipe in a week.

  92. Lisa
    Posted February 13th, 2009 at 1:55 pm | # |

    how long do you think this will last in the refrigerator before spoiling? Thanks!

  93. Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
    Posted February 12th, 2009 at 7:37 pm | # |

    Denise,
    : ) now you can even pronounce it clearly! cool!

    Dahanq,
    Good to hear from you again!

  94. Dahanq
    Posted February 12th, 2009 at 12:21 pm | # |

    Wah! Thanks for finally posting the recipe up hehe
    I remember I asked you in the summer :D

    It looks so good.. I’m going to make it once I go back home for spring break

  95. Denise
    Posted February 11th, 2009 at 7:32 pm | # |

    Thanks for sharing the recipe. I had tough time to even look for the name of the dish. I tried it in Korean restaurant and just loved it first time I tasted it.

  96. Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
    Posted February 11th, 2009 at 7:08 pm | # |

    twee moonie,
    haha, you are very clever! Of course you should do other things while waiting for well made sikhye! Start making it in the morning, then you will be able to eat it at dinner time.

  97. twee moonie
    Posted February 11th, 2009 at 1:31 pm | # |

    hi there maangchi!!!!

    so happy you have included a shikhae recipe! my future mother in law always makes this for the church and it’s so popular, hopefully it’ll be the same with her!

    thank you thank you! you’ve made the recipe very simple and easy! i guess the key to making shikhae is do other things while waiting ^_^

  98. Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
    Posted February 10th, 2009 at 9:40 pm | # |

    David and deborah,
    Yes, you can use other types of sweetener instead of white sugar. That’s just my recipe though. Even without using sugar, it’s a little sweet.

    deborah,
    * white short grain rice that’s what I use (for sushi).
    * If you don’t have a rice cooker, then you will have to keep the sikhye at about constant 60 degrees Celsius while it ferments.
    * I just use tap water and don’t find any problem until I finish sikhye.

    Good luck with making sikhye! I’m looking forward to your feedback. : )

  99. deborah Toronto, ON My profile page I'm a fan! joined 4/09
    Posted February 10th, 2009 at 9:22 pm | # |

    hi maangchi,

    thank you for posting this recipe! i have been secretly waiting for you to do this recipe for a long time now ;)
    it certainly takes a long time to finish… i’ll probably have to set aside a whole morning to do it!

    i have a couple questions:
    1. what type of rice is recommended? my family eats the brown sprouted rice so we don’t always have regular long grain white rice…
    2. what type of sugar is suitable? can i use sugars other than white sugar?
    3. i don’t have a rice cooker like you. what is an alternative method to ferment the “batch” to warm it?
    4. how long can this “batch” last in the fridge?
    5. when you store the fermented rice, you used regular tap water. will this affect the shelf life of the rice? i ask because my family use to keep tofu and we changed the water with tap water and it caused it to go bad much faster than if we used cooled boiled water.

    thanks again!!!

  100. David
    Posted February 10th, 2009 at 8:50 pm | # |

    Hello Mrs. Hammer,

    Do you think that 식혜 can be made without sugar? Maybe using a sugar substitute like Stevia? I would like to make this for someone with 당뇨병 so I wanted to make it without sugar. What do you think?

    Thanks! I love the recipes/videos on your site.

  101. Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
    Posted February 10th, 2009 at 7:43 pm | # |

    Nishu,
    Fantastic! : ) Let me know how your sikhye turns out!
    Thank you very much,

  102. Nishu
    Posted February 10th, 2009 at 10:08 am | # |

    I was really love this drink Thk you very very much maangchi I use to drink it from can from Korean Storesx now i can make it i am making it in Weekend thank you *******

  103. Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
    Posted February 10th, 2009 at 7:56 am | # |

    Maria,
    I think you are going to make sikhye soon! : )
    yes, soondubu jjigae recipe is included in my second book. Your nice message is already supportive. Thanks a lot!

  104. Maria
    Posted February 10th, 2009 at 12:30 am | # |

    Thank you so much for you-tubing and posting this recipe. I bought the barley powder months ago to try and make it on my own since the canned stuff just didn’t taste as good as my friend’s homemade shikye. I totally prefer making food myself and am going to give this recipe a go tomorrow! Btw, made your soon du bu two days ago and… Wow, it was really delicious and authentic tasting!! Is this recipe in your new book? I’m wondering how we can support your efforts and express our appreciation? Thank you, Maangchi!!


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