Recipes

Pork bones stew with potatoes and vegetables

Gamjatang 감자탕

Makes 2-3 servings. Cooking time: 2 hours.

Gamjatang (pork bone soup) is another Korean traditional nutritious dish. It’s usually made with pork spine bones and vegetables, but I use pork neck bones in this recipe.

Ingredients:
Pork neck bones, onion, garlic, ginger, dried shiitake mushrooms, napa cabbage, potatoes, soy bean sprouts, Asian chives (buchu), green onions, perilla leaves, dried red chili pepper, soybean paste, hot pepper flakes, hot pepper paste, cooking wine, perilla seeds powder (deulkkae garu), fish sauce

Directions:

  1. Soak 2.5 lb (about 1 kg) of pork neck bones in cold water for 2 hours.
    porkbones
  2. Boil water in a large pot.
  3. Put ¼ of a medium sized napa cabbage (about 2-3 cups) into the boiling water and blanch it for a minute.
  4. Rinse and drain the cabbage and put it in a bowl.
  5. Tear each leaf lengthwise once or twice to make it bite size and set it aside.
  6. Rinse pork neck bones in cold water and put them in boiling water with 4-5 slices of ginger (1 tbs). Cook for 7 minutes.
  7. Rinse and strain the pork neck bones and put them in a large pot.
    *tip: when you rinse the pork bones, pick out any excessive fat
  8. Pour 10 cups of water into the pot.
  9. Add 1 medium size sliced onion, 1 tbs of sliced ginger, 2 tbs of soy bean paste, 1 dried red chili pepper (after removing the seeds), and 2 dried shiitake mushrooms to the pot. Boil it for 1. 5 hours over medium high heat.
  10. Prepare a small bowl to make the sauce! In the bowl, put 6-8 cloves of minced garlic, 2 tbs of hot pepper flakes, 1 tbs of hot pepper paste, 3 tbs of cooking wine, 3 tbs of fish sauce, 3 tbs of perilla seeds powder (deulkkae garu) and mix it all up.
  11. Prepare a large bowl for vegetables
    vegetables1
    * Squeeze the cooked cabbage slightly to drain some of the water, and put it into the bowl.
    * Cut about 10 perilla leaves into bite sized pieces and put them into the bowl.
    perilla-leaves
    * Cut 2 stalks of green onion and Asian chives (2-3 cups worth) into 7 cm long pieces and put them into the bowl.
    * Rinse and drain 2 cups of soy bean sprouts and put them into the bowl.
    * Peel 3 small potatoes and put them into the bowl.
    Now you made the sauce and prepared all the vegetables. All you can do is to wait until the pork neck bone soup is finished cooking.
  12. About 1 ½ hours later, take the red hot chilli pepper and shiitake mushrooms out of the pot.
  13. Slice shiitake mushrooms into bite sized pieces.
  14. Add your vegetables and your sauce and the chopped shiitake mushrooms into the soup. Cook for another 30 minutes.
  15. 30 minutes later, transfer the soup into a serving bowl and sprinkle some chopped green onions and ground pepper.
    *tip: If you have an earthenware bowl, put the soup into it and heat it up until it sizzles. Sprinkle some chopped green onions and ground pepper!
    gamjatang1
  16. Serve with rice and kimchi or some side dishes!

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191 Comments:

  1. sanne Munich My profile page joined 8/14
    Posted November 15th, 2014 at 5:50 am | # |

    Hi Maangchi,

    Wow. Just Wow.

    We’ve eaten other Korean Gamjatang before, and it was delicious, but this one …

    I had organic spareribs and Kimchi made from shin young Napa-cabbage, washed and squeezed, skipped soaking and pre-cooking (neither bone nor much fat), used less water and put all the ginger to the soup from the beginning.
    After 1/2 hour in the pressure-cooker, I took out the meat, pulled out the bones and cut it in pieces and the mushrooms, put the soup through a collander and added all the ingredients. I had to substitute some; no puchu, more green onions and extra garlic instead; roasted sesame seeds – and it took 20 minutes in the pressure-cooker to get the potatoes right (because of the sour Kimchi).

    We ate a lot (with rice only), but there’s still more, still delicious. Tomorrow, I will cook beef-ribs in the left-over broth, add the vegetables and reheat them.

    Bye, Sanne.

  2. venuss Canada My profile page joined 9/14
    Posted September 16th, 2014 at 8:59 pm | # |

    Hi Maangchi. I am new to Korean cooking and have just started stocking my pantry with the basic ingredients I need. Can you tell me how to properly store the perilla seeds powder? Also, how long can I keep soybean paste in the fridge after I’ve opened it? Thank you so much, I look forward to seeing more of your wonderful videos!

  3. jinjoo usa My profile page joined 8/14
    Posted September 6th, 2014 at 7:17 pm | # |

    maang chi i’m going to try this tomorrow & if it turns OK i’ll send u the photo :) remember me Jinjoo i did the bread ppang last few wks ago? your recipes look v appetizing & yummy! i’ll try my best to make it look n taste like yours here :) kam sa hab ni da for sharing all wonderful recipes!

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted September 8th, 2014 at 10:58 am | # |

      yes, I remember you. How can I forget your name because jinjoo means pearl in Korean. : ) good luck with your Korean cooking!

      • Michin All over My profile page joined 10/14
        Posted October 23rd, 2014 at 10:04 pm | # |

        Hello, I just made the soup and I feel like it’s a little bland. I’m half korean and black and love all types of korean food. I didn’t add the perilla powder instead toasted sesame seed. What can I add to give it more flavor?

        • sanne Munich My profile page joined 8/14
          Posted October 24th, 2014 at 3:18 am | # |

          Hi Michin,

          What kind of bland?
          Maybe the Soybean Paste you use isn’t salty enough? Is it Doenjang or Miso?
          You may also add a little bit of Gochujang or more hot Peppers or some black Pepper or just a pinch of salt (preferably seasalt) or even just a little bit of vinegar or lemonjuice. Or you may add some well-fermented Kimchi for some sour taste, Kimchi-Jigae-wise. Or just less water …
          Do you use Korean Perilla-Leaves or Japanese Shiso?
          Did you put the dried Shiitake directly into the pot? That’s important; they add a lot of flavor that way! Use some more.

          Bye, Sanne.

  4. Bella Giyongchy Malaysia My profile page joined 8/14
    Posted August 15th, 2014 at 11:26 pm | # |

    Hi, Maangchi Unnie, I just joining your cooking web today as I love to try all of your recipe.Unnie, for this Gamjatang recipe, can i sub the cooking wain with something else ???😁😁😁

  5. Cutemom Indonesia My profile page joined 3/13
    Posted August 1st, 2014 at 12:02 am | # |

    Maangchi ssi,

    Each time i make this dish, the better it tasted. However, I can never finished it within 2-3 days, so I make a large amount of the soup, seasoned it and freeze it. Then whenever I want to make the dish, i just defrosted 5 portions worth of the soup and just add the vegetables. I only put in my very fermented kimchi (made with your recipe), kongnamul, chives, potatoes and kaenip if i can find some in my local korean store. Otherwise, no kaenip in my gamjatang.

    However, I think the serving part of your recipe is inaccurate. It says 2-3 servings but i always ended up with 10 servings.

    Kamsahamnida Maangchi ssi,

    Ima

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted September 8th, 2014 at 2:22 pm | # |

      Oh Ima, Ima! : )
      “It says 2-3 servings but i always ended up with 10 servings.” That’s good, you can feed 10 people with this recipe. Everybody needs a different portion to satisfy their stomach. I eat a huge bowl of gamjatang.

  6. hunche04 south korea My profile page joined 6/14
    Posted June 10th, 2014 at 10:37 pm | # |

    Wow one of my favorite 감자탕 i need to cook this for my husband…i learned to much maangchi…please make a lot of korean foods..

  7. mustwin Malaysia My profile page joined 6/14
    Posted June 7th, 2014 at 8:20 am | # |

    Dear Maangchi Shi,

    I absolutely love your website! It’s my go to for almost all the korean dishes we as a family enjoy.

    Could I use beef ribs/bones as we do not eat pork?

    I just bought a packet of perilla powder from the local korean mart here in Kuala Lumpur.

    Hope to her from you soon.

    Kamsa hamnida!

  8. Cutemom Indonesia My profile page joined 3/13
    Posted March 27th, 2014 at 12:04 pm | # |

    Hi, Maangchi ssi!
    I just made this yesterday to share with my friends. I now have tried all of your recipe except for bungeoppang because I can’t find the mold anywhere here in Indonesia. I have requested my boyfriend in Korea to bring 2 with him when he’s coming to see me next month.

    As always, your recipes are awesome. Thanks to you and your recipes, I manage to lose 3% belly fat and 7% total body fat and 6kg in 3 months. Since I’ve been making more and more kimchi, I ended up selling kimchi and kimchi products such as jinpang mandu with kimchi & pork filling ( we call them bakpao around here) and kimchi mandu.
    I use my fresh kimchi in my Gamjatang in place of the blanched cabbage and omitted the fish sauce in the sauce. Let me tell you that I got endless compliments and more kimchi orders.

    Thank you Maangchi ssi for turning this international home cook into a korean home cook. I cook korean food for my daily meals 4x a week. The other times when I don’t feel like cooking, I just eat rice with kimchi or kaenip jangaji. Thanks so much for your extensive website, easy to follow and accurate recipes. It helps me lose weight and eat well even when the heat kick me out of my own kitchen.

    Kamsahamida,
    Ima

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted March 27th, 2014 at 1:27 pm | # |

      Hi Ima,
      wow, you have made all of my recipes except for bungeoppang! I’m so happy to hear that you lost 6 kilograms in 3 months. “when I don’t feel like cooking, I just eat rice with kimchi or kaenip jangaji.” That’s right!

  9. IrishKoreanPretendChef Dublin My profile page joined 3/14
    Posted March 23rd, 2014 at 11:37 am | # |

    Hi Maangchi! I am trying to make your pork bone soup but have not been able to find perilla leaves or perilla seed powder in any Asian shops in my city. Can I substitute them with mint leaves and just leave out the seed powder? Is there something else I can substitute them with? Thanks Maangchi, I love your website!!

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted March 24th, 2014 at 9:34 am | # |

      Yes, mint or basil leaves will be a good substitute. And use roasted sesame seed powder if perilla seed powder is not available. Good luck! : )

  10. rickg Toronto My profile page joined 9/10
    Posted March 21st, 2014 at 9:15 pm | # |

    Maangchi, I love you. I think you’re awesome.

    1. I’m trying this recipe for the first time (though I’ve been wanting to try it for years!). To save time for tomorrow, I did a few things tonight: the pork is cooked, the sauce is made, the veggies are chopped, the nappa cabbage is blanched. Is this okay?

    2. Also, I bought perilla seeds and ground them myself. I made a kind of chunky dry paste rather than a powder. Is that okay? It tastes fine, but I’m not sure.

    3. I don’t have cooking wine, so I have to leave it out. Is that okay?

    Thanks, Maangchi. Keep on cookin’!

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted March 22nd, 2014 at 11:32 am | # |

      How did your gamjatang (pork bone soup) turn out? All you said is very ok to me!

      • rickg Toronto My profile page joined 9/10
        Posted March 23rd, 2014 at 9:59 am | # |

        I’m not going to lie to you, Maangchi. IT WAS AWESOME! I wouldn’t have changed a thing. Doing all the prep work the day before worked really well. The next day, I just had to heat up the soup, add the veggies and sauce, then wait 25 minutes for everything to cook together.

        I’ve tried the gamjatang in about 20 different Korean restaurants all over Toronto, mostly the Yonge and Finch area, where there are a million and one Korean restaurants (Note: I’m on the lookout for a new favourite Korean restaurant. Sadly, Todamgol on Yonge & Cummer closed. Sad face!). Some places have better gamjatang than others, that’s for sure. It’s all in the broth; if it’s tasteless and watery, I never go back! Anyhow, I’d like to think I know what good gamjatang is. In my humble opinion, it would be impossible for your recipe to disappoint anyone. The pork was cooked to perfection and the broth was rich and spicy – the way it should be. Thanks again!

        • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
          Posted March 24th, 2014 at 9:41 am | # |

          “I’ve tried the gamjatang in about 20 different Korean restaurants all over Toronto,..” Check out Eomji Bunsik (엄지분식) in Koreatown Yonge & Bathurst. That’s the best gamjatang place. I was inspired to make this recipe after trying theirs.
          The address: 615 Bloor St W.
          Toronto , ON
          Thank you for sharing your story. You are so passionate about food and cooking! Cheers!

          • rickg Toronto My profile page joined 9/10
            Posted March 27th, 2014 at 1:41 pm | # |

            Thanks for the suggestion. I’ve seen Um Ji Bun Sik on Bloor. I’ve only been to Ka Chi across the street (great gamjatang, terrible service!) I’ll give it a try the next time I’m in the “other” Koreatown (I still think the Korean food around Yonge & Finch is better – sorry!)

  11. rockyxu Canada My profile page joined 2/14
    Posted February 10th, 2014 at 10:44 pm | # |

    Hello!! I have a question about the perilla seed powder, mine is almost expired is it still okay to use?

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted February 11th, 2014 at 11:48 am | # |

      ” mine is almost expired is it still okay to use?” I’d like to ask you if it was stored in the freezer or not. If you bought it long time ago and kept it in the freezer, you still can use it. Smell it and taste it and if it tastes ok, you can use it. But you bought it recently and found it passed expiration date, throw it away.

  12. Zulumom Concord, CA My profile page joined 9/13
    Posted February 9th, 2014 at 4:32 am | # |

    Hi Maangchi!! I made this soup using some pork spare ribs I had! It’s raining a lot in CA and I didn’t want to BBQ outside, so I decided to make this soup instead. Wow…just simply amazing flavor using the fish sauce instead of soy sauce. Also, I added a ton of veggies as you suggested, and it was great. Thanks again!!! Hope all is well.

  13. MDT Canada My profile page joined 2/14
    Posted February 6th, 2014 at 6:36 pm | # |

    I can’t get enough of Gamjatang and this by far is the best recipe on the internet. I just have a quick question regarding the cooking method.
    Is there a reason why you wait until the last 30 mins of cooking before adding the sauce (hot pepper flakes, hot pepper paste..etc)? Wouldn’t adding the sauce in the first stage (when you add the soy bean paste) of cooking gives the pork more flavor?

    • Zulumom Concord, CA My profile page joined 9/13
      Posted February 9th, 2014 at 4:29 am | # |

      Hi, hope I can answer your question. I personally wait till the last ten to twenty minutes before adding the pepper flakes and garlic because they don’t taste as good when over cooked.

  14. christan Singapore My profile page joined 1/14
    Posted January 11th, 2014 at 10:27 pm | # |

    Hi Maangchi,

    Just want to thank you for the wonderful recipe.
    My wife has been craving for gamjatang ever since we came back from Korea last year. I followed your recipe and she was very satisfied with the results. I invited a friend over as well and needless to say, we finished everything. Thanks again :)

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted January 12th, 2014 at 12:14 pm | # |

      Your message makes me very happy today! I’m sure all of those who read your message will also be happy. Thank you for sharing your story!

  15. rala12 Korea My profile page joined 9/13
    Posted September 25th, 2013 at 7:04 am | # |

    Hello, Manngchi.
    Thanks for you cooking.
    I always cook for my mother with your recipe.
    She’s very satisfied with my cooking.
    It’s all your help.
    I’m in Korea…and I am in difficulty in finding your ‘fish sause’
    In Korea how can I replace your fish sause-umami?
    What is the most similar taste to umami?

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted September 26th, 2013 at 3:01 am | # |

      I am very impressed you cook for your mother! Good luck with your Korean cooking!
      Aekjeot (액젓) is fish sauce in Korean. You will be able to find it easily in any grocery stores in Korea. I recommend you get Kkanari aekjeot or myeolchi aekjeot there.

  16. S. Woodman Minneapolis, MN My profile page joined 9/13
    Posted September 12th, 2013 at 9:21 pm | # |

    It’s unbelievable how delicious this turned out to be! I couldn’t find any perilla leaves or powder (all the Asian groceries in my area are Hmong, Cambodian, or Vietnamese), but I compensated with a bit more cabbage and soy paste. This is my first time trying Korean cooking, and it sure won’t be my last!

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted September 13th, 2013 at 3:13 pm | # |

      Wonderful! If you make it again next time, add some basil leaves if perilla leaves are not available. Good luck with your Korean cooking!

  17. catskann64 pennsylvania My profile page joined 8/11
    Posted August 5th, 2013 at 7:34 pm | # |

    Oh, I forgot. I didn’t have napa, either😣, so I used kimchi. It still came out delicious!

  18. catskann64 pennsylvania My profile page joined 8/11
    Posted August 5th, 2013 at 7:33 pm | # |

    I’m in Lehigh county, PA. There are NO Korean restaurants here, so I’ve been pining! I tried your recipe, but had to make do without the perilla leaves (I had the seeds, so, yay!) and the sprouts, so I added winter bamboo shoots to add some more veggies to it. It was ridiculously awesome! Thank you for your recipes; they are my go-to source!

  19. kcduet25 New Orleans, LA, USA My profile page joined 5/13
    Posted May 3rd, 2013 at 1:54 pm | # |

    I had this last month when I was in S. Korea. It’s DELICIOUS! I’ve been craving 감자탕 ever since. I’m going to try your recipe this weekend so I can share this wonderful soup with my family. :)

  20. Romy1978 Argentina My profile page joined 4/13
    Posted April 27th, 2013 at 5:34 pm | # |

    안녕하세요?
    I want to say you “THANKS A LOT”!!
    I love Korean cooking but I didn’t know how to make it well. I just prepared it without any presicion and it’s not the same. But, by miracle, I found you on the web and now I can prepare it very well.
    Hi from Argentina!!

  21. aana malaysia My profile page joined 4/13
    Posted April 3rd, 2013 at 4:13 am | # |

    hi maangchi ssi. sorry out of the main menu topic. really loves to know how to cook hemul jim. can you share the recipe?

  22. kokojen Richmond City, Canada My profile page joined 2/13
    Posted February 26th, 2013 at 12:35 pm | # |

    I wasn’t able to find the perilla powder at the korean grocery store instead I bought a bottle of “roasted perilla seeds”. The ingredient of which is “perilla sesame”. Can i use this for the gamjatang recipe ??? Already cooked 4 of your recipes each one came out just perfect for our tummy! Thanks!!!

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted February 26th, 2013 at 9:18 pm | # |

      yes, grind the roasted sesame seeds finely before using. Good luck with making delicious gamjatang!

  23. bani Slovakia My profile page joined 2/13
    Posted February 23rd, 2013 at 5:49 am | # |

    Maangchi you make me hungry ….I love kamjatang. I remember my time in korea, I was eating it all the time.what can i use instead of sesame seeds?? we dont have it here

  24. baghdadia Canada My profile page joined 1/13
    Posted January 12th, 2013 at 8:14 pm | # |

    What an amazing dish. My husband and I really enjoyed it. It took a long time to make, but it was worth every minute! Thanks so much for the amazing recipe Maangchi! :-)

  25. iabbervocium United States My profile page joined 5/12
    Posted August 29th, 2012 at 4:43 pm | # |

    I am making tonight my first gamjatang following your method. It is SO delicious!

  26. Lanie Chester, Va My profile page joined 8/12
    Posted August 27th, 2012 at 1:11 pm | # |

    Hello, I just wanted to ask you what brand of pot cook ware do u use for your soups?

  27. bhanna Baguio City, Philippines My profile page joined 2/12
    Posted February 28th, 2012 at 8:50 pm | # |

    Hello maangchi..thank you for this site..I missed eating Gamjatang for a year now! This video will really help me to cook Gamjatang for my husband.It`s good that there are many Korean store here in Baguio City where I can buy the ingredients..More power to you!

  28. cris3131 US My profile page joined 1/11
    Posted January 20th, 2012 at 9:17 am | # |

    Love the music, Maangchi! I have not heard Scandal in a long time!

  29. RebeccaLaw Toronto My profile page joined 9/11
    Posted September 2nd, 2011 at 3:13 pm | # |

    Can i use other sauce instead of hot paste/hot pepper? Because my hubby can not eat too spice but he does loved korean pork bone soup. And i wanna try to make this yummy soup for him. :)

  30. sfsfai Hong Kong My profile page joined 2/11
    Posted February 23rd, 2011 at 12:13 pm | # |

    i can’t find the Perilla seeds powder / leaves !! =( what can i replace it with?

  31. winni3 My profile page joined 2/11
    Posted February 7th, 2011 at 12:41 am | # |

    Thanks so much for posting this recipe. I can’t wait to try it!

  32. shuhan90 Singapore, London My profile page joined 11/10
    Posted January 31st, 2011 at 7:31 pm | # |

    Thank you so much for this wonderful recipe and for all your wonderful recipes actually! I made this and it was soooo good especially in the cold winter! I wish I had the perilla though.. One day, I will make sure I find them and make this soup again. maybe it’ll go from good to amazing ;)
    Look at my gamjatang!
    http://mummyicancook.blogspot.com/2011/01/gamjatang-korean-pork-bone-soup.html

  33. tyne seoul My profile page joined 1/11
    Posted January 28th, 2011 at 1:28 am | # |

    hi maangchi! im so thankful i found your recipes especially gamjatang!
    i made this last jan.26,11 coz my parents in law visited our home for dinner. and woa! its really delicious! i also cooked jjapchae! my inlaws said im a good cook! i really love Korean Food! jeongmal! ^^,

    p.s. Im really happy coz itwas my 1st time to cookfood for them & it turned out great! especially when i heard their “burps”like “buuuuurp” really made me smile ^______^.

    thank you! ^^,

  34. beyeule My profile page joined 1/11
    Posted January 24th, 2011 at 6:52 am | # |

    What kind of cooking wine do I use? Is there a specific brand?

  35. iriskim NJ My profile page joined 11/10
    Posted November 21st, 2010 at 8:07 pm | # |

    Thank you so much for this recipe! My hubby and I live in northern NJ and there was a Korean restaurant in Fort Lee that served our favorite jeongols. Unfortunately, it closed down and I was so depressed! Today, I made your gamja tang recipe and it was delicious! It hit home perfectly and I am so happy that I can now make this at home. I tripled the ingredients for the perilla leaves (it’s my favorite) and I can’t wait to have it again. BTW, my hubby ate two huge bowlfuls! Thank you so much Maangchi!

    • jordymama Pasadena, CA My profile page joined 12/10
      Posted December 17th, 2010 at 1:26 am | # |

      Even though I made this as a non-spicy version and did not have the Perinella leaves or seeds, it still came out fabulous! I made it for my 18 month old son and he said, “HAIYAO” which means “I want more” in Chinese. I can’t wait to make the spicy version and use the Perinella leaves. Thanks Maangchi! Now i want to try all your other recipes!

  36. Football10Fan NA My profile page joined 9/10
    Posted September 16th, 2010 at 11:18 pm | # |

    Hi Maangchi,

    I want to make about 10 to 15 portions of this so everyone can eat this, and I will probably have many serving myself.

    I think I should just double and triple everything in the recipe, but with the chili paste, flakes, and pepper. I don’t know if that’s right.

    What should I do? My family love spicy food, so I don’t spice will be the problem. I just wanted to make sure

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted September 17th, 2010 at 12:07 am | # |

      I really don’t know the answer. You will have to do some experiments. But if I were you, I would multiply the ingredients by 7 or 8 for 15 servings.

  37. koreanfoodfan32 My profile page joined 5/10
    Posted August 20th, 2010 at 12:26 pm | # |

    Hi Maangchi,

    Can this be made with anchovy and kelp stock instead. If so, what would be the measurements, do you think? Thanks!:)

  38. Sylvia My profile page I'm a fan! joined 9/08
    Posted August 11th, 2010 at 8:45 pm | # |

    I have made friends with a Korean couple who own a local business.
    I gave them a container of my gamjatang. I was very nervous if they would like it.
    I cook by memory taste and I have never had this before. I followed the recipe exactly (except I doubled the whole thing and made a giant pot, I also used a lot of perilla).
    My children and husband loved it.
    Most important my Korean friend said that it was excellent and that my gamjatang was better than hers. Wow, what a compliment. It’s really because I had an excellent recipe. That and I have fresh perilla from my garden.
    Thank You again Maangchi for an authentic Korean recipe.
    Sylvia

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted August 11th, 2010 at 10:24 pm | # |

      You made Korean friends? Awesome! I’m so happy to hear that your family and your Korean friends enjoy the gamjatang you made! oh, smells good!!

  39. Sylvia My profile page I'm a fan! joined 9/08
    Posted August 9th, 2010 at 5:59 pm | # |

    I made this today with perilla from my garden and asian chives from my garden. I usually cook by taste and experience, but I have never had this before. I doubled the recipe because we have a large family.
    It is delicious. It has a good Korean flavor so I think I did everything right.
    The only thing I didn’t have was the perilla seed poweder.

  40. jaydimitri My profile page joined 8/10
    Posted August 4th, 2010 at 2:27 pm | # |

    Great site! Just discovered it.

    I forgot to pick up the perilla seeds at the Korean grocery store and have been searching for them elsewhere to avoid the 20 minute drive (with no traffic – highly unlikely in London) back there.

    Visited a local Chinese supermarket (big) but when questioned for the location of these ‘perilla seeds/powder’ using a variety of chinese, korean and japanese accents, all I got were blank stares and looks as if to say “what is this English idiot talking about”. I also muttered the Japanese term Shiso/Shizu to which they responded “Ahhh, Sushi!” :(

    So, I will try to make this without perilla powder (I have the leaves). Ms Maangchi, will I succeed in making something edible without perilla powder or will it be a failure?

  41. bluebird My profile page joined 7/10
    Posted July 18th, 2010 at 3:42 am | # |

    I am not sure if I can find all the vegetable ingredients. Are all of them essential? I know you said the potato is a must. Which ones are optional or not optional? I don’t want to miss ingredients that may affect the taste of the soup too much!

  42. min California My profile page joined 5/10
    Posted June 9th, 2010 at 11:28 am | # |

    This was the first dish i made from Maangchi’s site. It was “so delicious!” I find Korean cooking to be laborous. It takes multiple steps and lots of time (like French cooking). But your step by step instruction makes Korean cooking simple, enjoyable and delicious! Thank you, Maangchi for your dedication and for sharing. BTW, gamjatang was so good…I forgot to take a foto. :)

  43. fholyn south korea My profile page joined 5/10
    Posted May 25th, 2010 at 8:44 am | # |

    not cooking oil,, i mean is cooking wine..hehehehhehe soryyy..
    can i use soju?

  44. fholyn south korea My profile page joined 5/10
    Posted May 25th, 2010 at 8:41 am | # |

    hello!…i want to cook a camjatang but i failed to find a “fish souce”
    in the emart or grocery store. i cant find it. and also the cooking oil. one of my favorate food here in korea is the gamjatang…hu hu hu hu. i love to cook it plssss help me where can i find that fish sauce.and cooking oil. thankkk you..

  45. ext212 New Yaaawk Citaaaay My profile page joined 4/10
    Posted April 16th, 2010 at 11:56 am | # |

    Thank you for this recipe. I would like you to see my version since I used beef ribs rather than pork for this:
    http://www.writingwithmymouthfull.com/2010/04/16/gamjatang-korean-rib-soup-recipe/

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted May 26th, 2010 at 9:57 am | # |

      Your gamjatang looks great! “I think combining the two soups in this one recipe was a pretty good compromise even though Maangchi may slap my hand if she ever reads this..” no, no, no! lol

  46. rhealities Mississauga, ON My profile page joined 3/10
    Posted March 13th, 2010 at 4:15 pm | # |

    Anyeong Haseyo Maangchi – I just finished cooking gamjatang, it is indeed a success, kamsahamnida for a very good recipe =)

  47. Cooking My profile page joined 2/10
    Posted February 11th, 2010 at 7:38 pm | # |

    Hello maangchi !! I have made the soup and it tasted so good … I made it for a party so I made it at night but tomorrow I got fermented and it get too much sour!! I don’t know why? I finished cooked at 12am and I wake up at 12pm and it already got fermented :-( so I had to trow it in the garbage!!! Can you tell me why it happenning? Thanks ohhh and I love your website so muchhh keep going!!!!

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted March 16th, 2010 at 8:50 am | # |

      Throwing it away is a very good decision. It’s not fermented but it’s spoiled! Don’t forget to keep it in the refrigerator once the soup cools down.

  48. KY My profile page joined 2/10
    Posted February 9th, 2010 at 2:19 pm | # |

    I’m making this tonight. May I know why you precook the cabbage? Can you put it in raw with the rest of the vegetables at the last 30 mins of cooking?

    Thank you.

    • sinoglenda My profile page joined 3/10
      Posted March 16th, 2010 at 12:19 am | # |

      I am not 100% sure, but I assume that if you put raw cabbage in it. It will has a bit watery and fresh cabbage taste. I know normally korean use dry cabbage in this soup. Since it’s hard to find then what she suggest is the best.

  49. linnie My profile page joined 1/10
    Posted February 2nd, 2010 at 1:37 pm | # |

    can I use beef kneecaps for this recipe? My roommate bought the kneecaps and I have no idea what to do with them! (any suggestions?)

    by the way this recipe looks delicious :)

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted February 2nd, 2010 at 5:51 pm | # |

      Why don’t you make bone soup with beef bones?
      Just boil them with lots of water hours and hours until you get milky bone soup.

  50. Eileen
    Posted January 7th, 2010 at 10:00 pm | # |

    Hello! Thanks for this delicious recipe! I made this for dinner and my husbands wants it everyday! I am very happy with all your recipes! Thank you!!!

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted January 8th, 2010 at 12:42 am | # |

      haha, everyday? no, he will get tired of it soon. next time how about making soybean sprout soup which is very basic, popular, and delicious!
      http://www.maangchi.com/recipe/kongnamulguk

      • etiggerrr01 Los Angeles, CA My profile page joined 1/10
        Posted January 11th, 2010 at 1:37 am | # |

        Hehe.. I’ve made most of your recipes now and my husband is anxiously awaiting for me to make all your recipes. I made Kongnamulguk just the way you had it, and you are right! I think I’ve created a monster! ^_^ All your portions are perfect for 2-4 servings so we always make enough for dinner and lunch box for the next day.

        • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
          Posted January 11th, 2010 at 9:34 am | # |

          ooh, reading your comment makes me feel like kongnamulguk right now! I should make it soon for myself. I have well fermented radish kimchi, so it will be perfect to enjoy the soup.

  51. Meggie
    Posted November 6th, 2009 at 10:40 pm | # |

    Hello

    I always wanted to learn how to cook korean food! Your site is wonderful.
    The soybean paste, can I replace it with the chinese version?
    Can I use something else besides the pork bone neck or even replace it?

    Thank you!

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted November 7th, 2009 at 10:46 am | # |

      You could use pork spine bones, too.

      • Meggie
        Posted November 8th, 2009 at 9:09 pm | # |

        so basically is has to be pork with bone right?
        thank you for reply^^

        • Meggie
          Posted November 10th, 2009 at 6:26 am | # |

          I finally found the soybeanpaste but I am not sure is the correct one. Is made in Korea and has the name Mong-Go. Can I use this? thank you

          • Monika
            Posted December 7th, 2009 at 2:11 pm | # |

            I used Chinese Soybean Paste. It says “sweetened soybean paste”. I think it’s not as strong as the one Maangchi used. I put in almos 4 tbsp of it before I got any taste at all. But in the end, it all taste so yummy.

  52. Anon
    Posted November 3rd, 2009 at 6:39 pm | # |

    Hey just wanted to share a few things with all of you

    I LOVE THIS SOUP

    and uhh thats it i think

  53. aych
    Posted November 1st, 2009 at 11:29 am | # |

    I tried your recipe. It was pretty good, but it wasn’t much like the gamjatang you find in restaurants. There seems to be a really strong fermented soybean taste in this recipe, but how come there’s practically none in the restaurant versions?

    Our family doesn’t really like the fermented soybean smell/taste. That stuff is strong!

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted November 1st, 2009 at 12:02 pm | # |

      skip soy bean paste if you want. This is a very authentic recipe. You can modify the recipe to your taste. If you like to learn Korean cooking, you will have to try getting accustomed to fermented food such as soy bean paste, hot pepper paste, fermented fish sauce which are very important in Korean cuisine.

  54. Yanchen
    Posted October 9th, 2009 at 11:27 pm | # |

    Hi, thanks for this receipt, really enjoyed it.
    I used pork ribs instead, still delicious, hot, spicy, yummy,yummy!!

  55. Randi
    Posted October 2nd, 2009 at 1:20 am | # |

    hi! i’m from the u.s. and i have been living in south korea (and teaching english) for about 2.5 years! i just came across your cooking videos today and i love them! i’ve always wanted to know how to make rice cakes and your videos are really helpful. also i love gamchatang and i’m excited that i know how to make it now! :o) it’s good to know you can get most of these ingredients in the states so i can make my favorites after we move back there :o)

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted October 2nd, 2009 at 9:36 am | # |

      Welcome to my website! That’s right, when you come back to your home, you can make all kinds of Korean dishes!

  56. ann
    Posted September 20th, 2009 at 7:26 am | # |

    hi there! i’m a new fan of ur site and i really impressed of ur recipe..i really love kamjatang but can i ask? is the taste of neck bone diferent from the back bone coz i use to it..and what is the korean word for neck bone. As u know im from philippines and dont know what to say at meat store when i go for neck bone.i cooked sometimes and my husband and friends likes it but i never been try the neckbone.tnx and more power!!!

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted September 20th, 2009 at 7:50 am | # |

      You could use either neck bone or back bone. I think there is not much difference in taste. I have never made gamjatang with back bone. Pork neck bone is called “doeji mokppyeo” : 돼지목뼈
      Pork back pone is called “doeji deungppyeo”: 돼지등뼈

      Let me know how your gamjatang turns out. Thank you!

  57. Israel
    Posted September 19th, 2009 at 1:44 pm | # |

    HI, I can´t wait to make this recipe, I was living in Toronto, and i always go to korean town to eat gamjatang, Im from Mexico city, I`ve already find all the ingredients,but here the stores only sale perilla seeds, not powder What do i do, Buy them ?

  58. Anonymous
    Posted September 16th, 2009 at 6:28 pm | # |

    I live in Toronto and love the Korean food we have available here – I am not Korean, but know what authentic Korean food is supposed to taste like from my many Korean friends…this recipe is AMAZING – it is exactly how pork-bone soup tastes in the restaurants – thank you soo much for sharing!
    For those wondering, perilla plants are available for purchase during the spring/summer months. The ones I have seen and that are growing on my property are less than 2 feet tall (at most). I am hopeful that you can use typical herb-preserving methods (i.e. blanching-freezing) to preserve the leaves over the winter for additional recipes, or maybe just keep a plant indoors over the winter!

  59. Suk
    Posted August 31st, 2009 at 11:58 pm | # |

    Hi Maangchi,
    I love your site. Just one quick comment about the origin of the word ‘Gamjatang': ‘Gamja’ in this case refers to a specific part of the pork’s backbone and not to a potato, which is a general misconception. If this was indeed a potato based recipe, it would be more of a kuk (국) as it would not really be considered a tang (탕). A ‘tang’ is different from a ‘kuk’ in that the broth is usually a protein (bone in) cooked for a long time, like seollongtang, gomtang, even meuntang.
    Keep up the good work!

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted September 1st, 2009 at 9:05 pm | # |

      Thank you for your informative comment! Someone else mentioned the same thing somewhere on my website (or YouTube comment?) long time ago, so it made me do some research on the origin of gamjatang. Unfortunately I still don’t find clear answer about it. Check this out
      http://kr.ks.yahoo.com/service/ques_reply/ques_view.html?dnum=AAL&qnum=486068
      It says, there must be 2 theories regarding the origin of gamjatang. The first theory is that the name gamjatang came from the main ingredient, some part of pork spine bones called “gamjeo” in Korean,

      The second theory is that gamjatang was named because it uses lots of vegetables especially potatoes. Potato is “gamja”.

      Actually I don’t care much about origin of some food names or difference between tang and kuk!
      Don’t give me a headache! :) I use the names my mother and grand mother, aunts, and my friends use!

      • Jeannie
        Posted October 31st, 2009 at 7:46 am | # |

        AND name used all over Korea! Gamja gook is a clear brothed soup which I also enjoy where you make with some soup meat and sliced potatoes. Gamja Tang is exactly how you made it!!!! Who cares the history behind food or name!!! well…interesting to find about, but not a big deal if story telling results some difference in opinion! I LOVE your recipes! Your choice of food are not ones you find in fancy cook books(or fancy restaurants) but what you always crave because you’ve had it at home or at regular people restaurant. I am very thankful for your recipes….I feel like I have my own mom/grandma teaching me to cook ;that’s been missing in my life. I feel that most people who visit your site feel the same. We are all very grateful to your sharing these wonderful recipes. Please don’t stop!

  60. Vivian
    Posted August 26th, 2009 at 9:41 am | # |

    HI
    I had one question. I’m not too sure i can get the perrila seeds and leaves, what can I replace it with?

  61. Derrick
    Posted August 23rd, 2009 at 6:12 am | # |

    Hi Maangchi,

    I have searched for this recipe for year and have sorely missed gamja tang since leaving Korea. I would eat at least once a week when I was in Gunsan. Have asked many Korean friends for a recipe but no one knew how to cook it. I had given up looking a couple of years ago and just decided to try again. Thanks for the recipe. I look forward to cooking it soon as I can find the right ingredients.

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted August 23rd, 2009 at 11:03 am | # |

      oh, you used to live in Gunsan!
      I guarantee my gamjatang recipe won’t disappoint you. : )

  62. chit villegas
    Posted August 20th, 2009 at 6:45 pm | # |

    Hi Maangchi,

    Is perilla leaves necessary? I mean how is this recipe if I cannot find perilla leaves? Can I use any substitute? Thanks

    chit

  63. Starving Man
    Posted August 10th, 2009 at 12:33 am | # |

    I love Gamjatang! My first taste of Korean food was in a Gamjatang restuarant. I cooked with your awesome recipe this weekend and my wife loved it so much that she ate it for dinner, breakfast and lunch!
    Thanks again Maangchi ~ your recipes really help me give her some taste of home when she’s so far away from it!

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted August 10th, 2009 at 6:48 am | # |

      You are such a cool husband! I’m very glad to hear that your wife loved your gamjatang! Gamjatang recipe is a little difficult but you made it. I think you can make any kinds of recipes I have posted so far. Cheers!

  64. djesteban
    Posted August 9th, 2009 at 10:38 pm | # |

    I followed you recipe and it’s AMAZING!
    It is fairly long to make, but it’s well worth it! I even tried to remix it a bit by adding some fresh algae (that they sell at my local Korean market)… it was pretty good, but you got to be careful not to add to much or it will completely destroy the recipe (they quadruple in size when soaked and cooked and its taste takes a lot of place!)
    But I have one question Maangchi. I have seen some pics on the web which shows this recipe to have a very deep red color (like the photo shown on wikipedia: )
    Do you know what they added to make it to have this deep red tint?
    Thank you in advance and thanks again for the recipe! ;)

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted August 10th, 2009 at 6:46 am | # |

      yayee! Congratulation! Now you can make gamjatang (porkbone soup with vegetables) anytime!
      The degree of redness depends on the amount of hot pepper flakes.

  65. ant
    Posted July 12th, 2009 at 10:39 am | # |

    hello!

    i tried your gamjatang today and the result was great. thanks for the wonderful recipe. this taste much better than my not so successful soon dubu jigae. :)

  66. anna
    Posted June 29th, 2009 at 3:17 pm | # |

    hello maangchi!
    i am a new fan!! i tried this dish last week and i think my husband fell in love with me all over again. he asked me if i could make it once a week for him.
    thank u!!!
    anna

  67. Elisa Kim
    Posted June 29th, 2009 at 2:53 pm | # |

    My husband has been craving gamja tang for months… I didn’t know how to make it. when I found this recipe, I tried it and it was absolutely fabulous! My husband thought it was delicious. This recipe is definitely a keeper. He’s asking when I will be making it again. Thanks for your awesome recipe!

  68. JC*~
    Posted June 16th, 2009 at 9:09 pm | # |

    Thanks for another great recipe Maangchi….I tried making this yesterday and it turned out really OILY with lots of fat! Any tips to fix this ? Thanks!

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted June 17th, 2009 at 6:27 am | # |

      Did you follow the direction step by step?
      “# Rinse pork neck bones in cold water and put them in boiling water with 4-5 slices of ginger (1 tbs). Cook for 7 minutes.
      # Rinse and strain the pork neck bones and put them in a large pot.
      *tip: when you rinse the pork bones, pick out any excessive fat”

      • Anonymous
        Posted June 17th, 2009 at 6:27 pm | # |

        Yup, I tried to pick out the excess fat…maybe I’m not very good at picking it out, I couldn’t find much fat on the bones!

      • Anonymous
        Posted August 20th, 2009 at 6:43 pm | # |

        Hi!

        Try boiling the meat day before…refrigerate with the soup and you will see all the fat floating…then you can scoop them all out…then do all the rest of the recipe.

        chit

  69. Tim
    Posted June 5th, 2009 at 4:01 pm | # |

    Hello Maangchi! Thank you for the recipie I enjoy Gamjatang quite often just down the street, it will be great to make it on my own!

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted June 5th, 2009 at 9:38 pm | # |

      yes, homemade gamjatang can’t be compared with restaurant gamjatang in terms of taste and nutrition!

  70. Young
    Posted May 26th, 2009 at 10:14 pm | # |

    Hey. Thanks for the recipe. I am going to make this with 6 lbs of pork neck bone. Instead of about doubling the ingredients, is there anything else in particular that I should alter, such as the cooking times?

  71. Agasuka
    Posted May 24th, 2009 at 11:00 pm | # |

    Same as Debora, I’d like to request a video of Kalbi Tang, so that I can make it myself.
    It’s pricey in the resturant, consider paying $15 for a bowl which filled up with liquid(broth), only one piece of kalbi, a little bit of Dang Myun, and some egg…

  72. Agasuka
    Posted May 24th, 2009 at 5:29 pm | # |

    How do you eat that whole potato?
    Just use ta spoon to scoop it when eating from the earthware?

  73. deborah Toronto, ON My profile page I'm a fan! joined 4/09
    Posted May 17th, 2009 at 10:16 pm | # |

    hi maangchi, i too just made gamjatang tonite. what a treat the final result was! my mom loved it!! i forgot to get the bean sprouts but i just substituted for more nappa cabbage instead (b/c the sprouts didn’t look fresh). though this is one of the longer recipes i’ve tried, it’s well worth all the work at the end! :)

    thank you again and i can’t wait to see what else you put up! :)
    p.s. kalbi tang or seollang tang would be fun to see too ;)

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted May 18th, 2009 at 4:08 am | # |

      You made it! I would like to see what it looks like! : )
      You are such a good daughter! Yes, the recipes for kalbitang and seollang tang will be posted in the future. Thank you!

      • deborah Toronto, ON My profile page I'm a fan! joined 4/09
        Posted June 3rd, 2009 at 11:18 pm | # |

        oops! we ate it all before i could get a good photo… i’m making it again this sunday. i’ll send a photo then :)

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted June 4th, 2009 at 7:12 am | # |

      This Sunday again! : )

      • deborah Toronto, ON My profile page I'm a fan! joined 4/09
        Posted June 16th, 2009 at 10:56 pm | # |

        i ate it all again! mmmm it’s so good :) i’ll try harder thsi time not to eat everything before i make it ;)

  74. Sin
    Posted May 17th, 2009 at 6:09 pm | # |

    HI! I just made the gamjatang and it was EXCELLENT!!!!!! I couldnt find perilla leaves nor the powder so i didnt put them, but i did put seasame powder like you suggested to another member. I also forgot to buy the napa cabbage after two visits to the grocery store =__= So i used the white part of the chinese *bok choi* and it came out pretty well! I added some ENOKI mushroom as well…

    THANK YOU, ure a genius ^^

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted May 17th, 2009 at 6:32 pm | # |

      Omg, you are very smart! Using bokchoi is a really good idea! Congratulation on your successful gamjatang making! I’m happy for you.

  75. kim inhae
    Posted May 14th, 2009 at 8:39 am | # |

    Thank you =) I was wondering if you thought too much flavour would be lost if I soaked the pork necks for about 12 hours – I would like to make it for dinner for someone next week, but I don’t have enough time to wait for it to soak for 2 hours before we will sit down to dinner

    Thanks!

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted May 15th, 2009 at 6:41 am | # |

      why not! You could soak it for 12 hours, but keep it in the refrigerator until you cook. Don’t worry about losing flavor, it won’t happen. Good luck with your gmajatang making!

  76. deborah Toronto, ON My profile page I'm a fan! joined 4/09
    Posted May 13th, 2009 at 9:59 am | # |

    hi maangchi,

    it’s great to see that you were able to make the gamjatang! my mom has been asking me to make this for her for as long as she knew i started looking at all your recipes! i can’t wait to make some for my mom.

    a couple questions,
    1. what is the purpose of cooking it in a regular pot then putting it into the earthen ware bowl before serving as boiling?
    2. i have noticed that restaurants use some sort of round seed… what is that?

    thanks!
    deborah

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted May 13th, 2009 at 7:38 pm | # |

      I’m sure you will make the most delicious gamjatang soon! : )

      1,
      The reason I transfer gamjatang to the earthenware bowl is to make it sizzling so that it will look more appetizing.
      I think many of my blog readers bought an earthenware bowls to follow some of my recipes such as soondubu and doenjang jjigae. I should give them more chance to use their earthenware bowl as many times as possible.
      If you don’t have it, you can serve it in any pot or skillet.

      2.
      round seed? Do the seeds look like very small balls? If so, they may be deulkkae(perilla seeds) Anyway, ground deulkkae is supposed to be used for gamjatang. If it’s not deulkkae, I don’t know.

      • deborah Toronto, ON My profile page I'm a fan! joined 4/09
        Posted May 14th, 2009 at 10:06 pm | # |

        hi maangchi,

        i can’t wait! i have to do some planning though because i have to look for the deulkkae powder and seeds.

        i have two sizes of earthen ware bowls! i make soon dubu for my mom every month or so. i haven’t really used it for much else though… hehehe

        i think it is the perilla/deulkkae seed. it probably is more for garnish than taste though. good to know!

        thank you again! i’ll be sure to send a photo your way when a good batch turns out :)

  77. Nishu
    Posted May 12th, 2009 at 12:34 pm | # |

    Ye!Ye!
    Another Delecious Recipe Will Try It Soon
    Can You Show How To Make Korean Style CURRY RICE
    I Love It~~~
    !!

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted May 12th, 2009 at 5:35 pm | # |

      sure, Korean style curry rice is one of my upcoming video recipes. Thank you. Let me know how your gamjatang turns out!

  78. manny
    Posted May 12th, 2009 at 6:37 am | # |

    Is this dish really spicy? Can I make it without the spicy ingredients, such as the hot pepper flakes and paste, and the red chilli pepper? I’d prefer to make it not spicy.

  79. I Love to Eat
    Posted May 11th, 2009 at 7:42 pm | # |

    This looks so good! I’ll definately have to try it sometime :)

  80. cindy
    Posted May 11th, 2009 at 3:47 am | # |

    oh i liked this soup very much when my husband was in korea
    Tommorow My Husband’s Boss Is Coming Who Is Korean And His Fav Food Is Kalbi
    I Know That You’ll Show Kalbi Video Someday But its Urgent
    Can You Tell Recipe In Short (PLEASE)
    :)

  81. Elleen
    Posted May 8th, 2009 at 11:55 pm | # |

    Hi Maangchi,

    Thank you for your recipe!
    One question: Why a lot of people use Soy Bean Paste to make this soup? Is it necessary? Thank you for your answer!

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted May 9th, 2009 at 7:47 am | # |

      Yes, it’s necessary for this recipe. A little amount of soy bean paste removes pork meat odor and also makes this soup delicious.

      • Anonymous
        Posted May 15th, 2009 at 8:52 am | # |

        I was wondeirng, if you can use japanese miso instead of the soybean paste. Would it taste very different? Thanks

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted May 15th, 2009 at 8:59 am | # |

      yes,it will be good, too!

  82. Cam
    Posted May 7th, 2009 at 11:48 am | # |

    Hi!
    Wow, that looks really tasty!
    I’ve never been able to find perilla leaves at my korean grocer, so its good to know that basil might work as well.
    I was just wondering what the purpose of soaking the pork bones in water is?

    Thanks for the new recipe-
    Oh, and i love the new layout for your website- très cool.

  83. Vicky
    Posted May 7th, 2009 at 9:29 am | # |

    Hi..Kam Ja Tang was one of my favorite meals on a cold winter day. It is so delicious. I’m going to try this recipe for sure! I think it’s odd that it is called “potato soup”. There’s really a lot more meat than spuds!

  84. Anonymous
    Posted May 7th, 2009 at 1:56 am | # |

    Thanks for all the recipes and cooking demonstrations on youtube.

  85. Michelle Kim
    Posted May 7th, 2009 at 1:19 am | # |

    Thanks for the recipe! Is it possible to make this recipe with beef? If you can,what part of beef can you use? (my husband doesn’t like pork)
    I’ve been wanting to eat 감자탕 ever since 감자탕 전문 식당 opened up in Flushing. By the way, I’ll be making 화전 for my mother-in-law for Mother’s Day. Thanks a lot! 좋은 주말 보내시길 바래요. ^_^

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted May 7th, 2009 at 5:56 am | # |

      I think you could replace pork bones with beef short ribs. Let me know how it turns out if you make it.

      • 이한민
        Posted December 1st, 2009 at 3:47 am | # |

        Hi Maangchi! Have you heard back about whether 감자탕 would taste good with beef short ribs? 저는 되지를 못먹어요. I have allergies to pig, so I wanted to know how it would taste. I never had 감자탕 made for me due to my allergies. Please let me know! 고마워요!

        • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
          Posted December 1st, 2009 at 9:20 am | # |

          : ) beef short ribs for this recipe sounds good! I should try it out, too. Thank you very much for your question.

  86. Mun
    Posted May 6th, 2009 at 10:20 pm | # |

    Hi Maangchi,

    Can you upload the podcast? Bcuz u prefer to cook and watch the video at the same time…

    =) thank you!

  87. Tuty
    Posted May 6th, 2009 at 7:55 pm | # |

    Maangchi,
    I just recently stumble into your blog.
    I love your informative blog and video too.
    This soup looks very hearty. H Mart just recently opened in my neighborhood and they have great selection of everything Korean :-)
    I should try some of your recipe.

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted May 6th, 2009 at 8:17 pm | # |

      oh, you are lucky to have a Korean grocery in your neighborhood!
      Some of my blog readers drive hours and hours to get ingredients.
      It sounds like you will become a regular customer of the store.

  88. Anastacia
    Posted May 6th, 2009 at 7:34 pm | # |

    So yummy yummy!

  89. Anonymous
    Posted May 6th, 2009 at 4:17 pm | # |

    If only I have a korean market nearby my house…My asian market never sell perilla leaves and perilla seed powder.

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted May 6th, 2009 at 8:15 pm | # |

      hmmm, sorry to hear that. How about replacing perilla leaves with basil leaves. Use just a little bit. And instead of perillar seeds powder, use sesame seeds powder. If sesame seeds powder is not available, just skip it. Modify the recipe adjusting to your situation. Let me know how it turns out if you make it. I’m curious.

      • ryan
        Posted June 7th, 2009 at 11:23 pm | # |

        I just tried it out and substituted with basil and sesame seeds as you suggested. I also used beef bones and a brisket, instead. I have to say it turned out better than I could imagine! I’ll send you a pic when I upload it. Thank you for the tip and many inpirational videos.

      • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
        Posted June 8th, 2009 at 9:31 am | # |

        ryan,
        you are so smart! : )

    • Kim Inhae
      Posted May 15th, 2009 at 9:43 am | # |

      Hi – I thought that I’d point out that sometimes the powder will be labelled as “frutescens powder” (latin name). That’s how it is at my local market, but it’s the same thing!

  90. Sylvia My profile page I'm a fan! joined 9/08
    Posted May 6th, 2009 at 2:39 pm | # |

    I’ve never had this, it looks delicious.


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