Recipes

Hand-torn noodle soup

Sujebi 수제비

Sujebi is a traditional Korean noodle soup, and is well-loved and popular among Koreans. The noodles are made with homemade dough, and while noodles are usually cut with a knife, these noodles are unique in that each flat noodle is torn by hand!

The ingredients are very simple and it doesn’t cost much money to make, so it used to be regular food for some poor people who couldn’t afford rice. But Koreans still love this food and eat it all the time.

One day I read a magazine article about a famous Korean actress who passed away last year. She was asked by the reporter what dish she likes the most. Her answer was, “kimchi sujebi! When I was young, we were so poor that my mother always made kimchi sujebi. I got tired of it terribly at that time, but for some reason, I have craving for the kimchi sujebi. It’s my favorite food!”

Once I read it, I wanted to make kimchi sujebi. Whenever I eat my kimchi sujebi, I think about the actress! What she said in the magazine motivated me to like sujebi more than before.

My grandmother used to make sujebi in a huge iron pot. When she decided to make sujebi for lunch, she would start kneading the dough soon after breakfast. She put the dough into a basin, and brought it out of the kitchen. She sat down and was kneading and pressing, and talking to us at the same time. Koreans usually use a large bowl or basin to knead dough instead of a cutting board.

I stood next to her and helped her tear the dough and put it into the boiling soup, but couldn’t follow her speed.

She used to say, “Be careful, the soup is hot. Go out and play with friends!”
My dough usually turned out too thick and when the soup was done, I could easily see who got my noodles.

Oh, so many good memories about my grandmother! I should have learned more from her, if only I had known I would be blogging about Korean traditional food someday. She passed away long time ago, and her life was dedicated to feeding her husband and children. She was a real expert on cooking Korean food.

Sujebi (mild version)

Ingredients: (2-3 servings):

  • 2 cups of all purpose flour
  • ½ teaspoon of  salt
  • 1 Tablespoon of vegetable oil
  • 12 large dried anchovies, removed the heads and guts
  • Dried kelp (about 4 or 5 inches on each side)
  • 1 stalk of green onion, chopped
  • 2 medium sized potatoes, peeled and cut into bite sized pieces
  • ½ cup of onion, sliced
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 Tablespoon of fish sauce
  • 1 Tablespoon of soup soy sauce (If it’s not available, replace it with 1-2 teaspoons of salt according to your taste)
  • 1-2 teaspoons of sesame oil
  • Water

Directions:

  1. Combine  the flour, ¾ cup water, salt, and vegetable oil in a large bowl. Knead by hand for 10-15 minutes until the dough gets softer and sticks together firmly.
    dough
  2. Put the dough into a plastic bag and keep it in the refrigerator.
    *tip: Using a food processor is very convenient and saves time. If you use a food processor, use the dough blade and knead all the above ingredients for 1 minute until the dough sticks together and gets lumpy.

Let’s make stock:

  1. Place 10 cups of water in a large pot. Add  dried kelp and  dried anchovies
    sujebi stock
  2. Bring it to a boil for 20 minutes over medium high heat, then lower the heat to simmer for another 20 minutes.
  3. Turn the heat off and take the anchovies and kelp out.
  4. Add the potato, onion, and garlic to the pot and boil 10-15 minutes over medium high heat.
  5. Cut the cooked kelp into bite sized pieces. Set aside.
  6. Open the pot and add fish sauce, soup soy sauce (or salt), and the kelp strips.
    ingredients

Now it’s time to make noodles!

  1. Put the dough in your left hand, and pull and stretch it with your right. Get it as thin as you can. Then tear it into bite sized pieces with your right. Drop it into the boiling soup. Repeat this until the dough runs out.
    *tip: If you make more than 4 servings’ worth, tearing the dough may take too long. So all family members should work together.
  2. Close the lid and cook for a couple of minutes to let the noodles cook. The noodles will float on the surface when cooked properly.
  3. Add the green onion and sesame oil
  4. Transfer to a bowl and serve hot with kimchi.

sujebi

Hot spicy kimchi sujebi: 1 serving

Ingredients:
2 cups of all purpose flour
½ of salt
1 Tablespoon of vegetable oil,
6 large dried anchovies with the heads and guts removed
1 medium potato, peeled, cut into bite sized pieces
¼ cup onion, sliced
1 stalk of green onion,  chopped
1/4 cup of kimchi, chopped
2 Tablespoons of kimchi juice
1 garlic clove, minced
2 Tablespoons of hot pepper paste
1 teaspoon of sesame oil 
water

Directions:

  1. Combine flour, ¾ cup of water, salt, and  vegetable oil in a large bowl. Knead by hand for 10-15 minutes until the dough gets softer and sticks together firmly.
  2. Put the dough into a plastic bag and keep it in the refrigerator.
    *tip: Using a food processor is very convenient and saves time. If you use a food processor, use the dough blade and knead all the above ingredients for 1-2 minutes until the dough forms a ball.

Let’s make stock:

  1. In a shallow pot, place 3 ½ cups of water, the kimchi,  kimchi juice, potato,  onion, garlic, and  dried anchovies.
  2. Close the lid and bring to a boil for 10 minutes over medium high heat. Lower the heat and simmer another 10 minutes.
  3. Meanwhile, take out the dough from the refrigerator and knead a few more minutes until the dough gets smooth and silky.
  4. Put the dough back into the plastic bag.
  5. Open the lid of the boiling pot and take out the anchovies and add  hot pepper paste. Stir it with a spoon.

Now it’s time to make noodles!

  1. Divide the dough into 2 pieces. Put 1 piece of the dough into a plastic bag and keep it in the fridge for a future use.
  2. Put the other dough in your left hand, and pull and stretch it with your right. Get it as thin as you can. Then tear it into bite sized pieces with your right. Drop it into the boiling soup. Repeat this until the dough runs out.
  3. Close the lid and boil it for a few more minutes to cook the dough
  4. Turn the heat off and add green onion and a few drops of sesame oil.
  5. Serve hot!

spicy kimchi sujebi

If you want to, you can add an egg when it’s still hot:
kimchi sujebi with egg

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151 Comments:

  1. Naotix United States My profile page joined 6/14
    Posted October 2nd, 2014 at 1:13 am | # |

    Looks so good!
    Definitely going to have to make this once I take a trip to Paldo World!
    If you ever come visit the rainy state of Washington, keep me in mind!
    I would absolutely love the chance to cook with you and show around! c:

  2. Poatato Tacoma, wa My profile page joined 5/14
    Posted May 16th, 2014 at 12:37 pm | # |

    Thank you so much, Maangchi for the detailed instructions and thoroughness of this recipe! I was feeling awful recently and woke up craving some good sujebi, but not wanting to get out of bed. I turned over and whined to my boyfriend “I waaaannnt suuuujebiiiiiii,” so he looked up this recipe, ran it by me (I told him it looked good, but to add some sliced zucchini) then made it for me! I was shocked that he, as a Mexican American who has never cooked a Korean meal, was able to make sujebi better than most of the Korean restaurants around here with very minimal coaching.

    I know that if I had tried to explain to him how to make it, it would have ended in disaster, because I’m in the “small handful” or “until it smells right” school of cooking, and he likes exact amounts. The soup was great, and helped me to feel better. There’s really nothing like a nice hot bowl of sujebi to calm an angry stomach. So, thanks again! Now that I know he can use your recipes, he might just be cooking me Korean food more often!

  3. x_uannx Singapore My profile page joined 3/14
    Posted March 30th, 2014 at 10:57 pm | # |

    Hello! I always have this dish back at home, it tastes really good! But instead of kelp, we use soy bean instead, and we will use the winter mushroom to give it a stronger flavor! To give a sweeter flavor to it, we will add Sauropus androgynus plant to it, it tastes really good! As a topping, we use stir-fried finely chopped onion, and when we eat with our family on a cold day, it’s really ‘daebak’! :)

  4. sjl2107 Upland, CA My profile page joined 11/13
    Posted November 11th, 2013 at 10:39 pm | # |

    Hi Maangchi! I finally got myself to join your website and wanted to THANK YOU so much for being an inspiration & changing the lives of so many people! So, I just made my most favorite this ever and this recipe was better than I had at most restaurants so thank you so much! The only thing was that my dough (hand kneaded) was tough so I just added more oil? I definitely need more practice on this part!

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted November 13th, 2013 at 10:23 am | # |

      “this recipe was better than I had at most restaurant” great compliment!
      I would add more water instead of oil.

  5. jaylivg Houston My profile page I'm a fan! joined 7/10
    Posted June 14th, 2013 at 6:18 pm | # |

    Okay , the very first time i made sujebi was 3 years ago !!! i can’t believe i only made this dish once !!

    Anyway i have to post another comment , because this time , i didn’t use store bought kimchi like 3 years ago . I used the kimchi that i made from your recipe :) The result was so much better and i added eggs and shrimps at the end of cooking . Everyone loved it , i doubled the recipe and we finished them all for dinner :) This will be a good dish for a cold rainy night , but yesterday was super hot and we still enjoyed the dish !!

    Thanks again :)

  6. ina78 Jerteh, Terengganu, Malaysia My profile page I'm a fan! joined 4/09
    Posted April 7th, 2013 at 7:22 am | # |

    Hai everyone!
    I made this recipes today….. I made the spicy version with my kimchi. I don’t have hot pepper paste, but I substitute it with soy sauce, and it’s turn so yummy…. I’ll upload the photo soon…. Bye everyone…..

  7. OhLaLaChrissy NY My profile page joined 2/13
    Posted February 16th, 2013 at 2:40 pm | # |

    Can I make the dough, put some in the soup, and then put the unused dough in the fridge until the next day? I’m cooking for myself and I can’t eat all of it in one day! Will the dough get too hard? Thank you!

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted February 17th, 2013 at 11:18 am | # |

      Keep the leftover dough in the refrigerator. It will be ok up to a few days.

      • OhLaLaChrissy NY My profile page joined 2/13
        Posted February 19th, 2013 at 7:04 pm | # |

        Thank you! I didn’t know you responded to me here, so I asked on facebook. You can disregard my question on there. 감사합니다!

  8. emilymichelle67 Tampa, Florida My profile page joined 10/12
    Posted February 6th, 2013 at 6:30 pm | # |

    Hi! I’m having a what I think is a big problem… I’m not Korean in the least, nor have I ever made Korean food. I went to an Asian market and purchased all of the ingredients for this but.. when I was buying the ingredients I wasn’t sure if kelp and seaweed were the same thing so I looked it up on my phone and it said they were. Anyway, it doesn’t look like your picture and it’s not cooking like your directions. Straight when I put it in the pot it turned to mush and it’s definitly not something I would be able to cut into bite-sized pieces and it says right on the package “Dried Seaweed”. Do you have any idea what I’m cooking with and what I should buy next time?

  9. Lixin Singapore My profile page joined 3/12
    Posted August 4th, 2012 at 10:16 pm | # |

    Hi! How many people does this recipe serve? :D

  10. Amirah. K Sydney, Australia My profile page joined 7/12
    Posted July 16th, 2012 at 6:06 am | # |

    Dear Maanchi,
    Can you please tell me the recipe and how many ingredients to put in for a family of 6.
    For example, how many ml of water and spoons of salt or soy sauce etc.

  11. SerinityCloud united states My profile page joined 5/12
    Posted May 10th, 2012 at 9:39 am | # |

    Thank you so much for this recipe. My mother would make this for me growing up but i didn’t know what it was called or how to make it myself. She moved far away to live with my sister so haven’t had this dish for so long. I plan to make this tonight!!! I know it should turn out well. Your recipe explains the steps easily. Thank you!!! :)

  12. mjl102007 Jacksonville, AL My profile page joined 7/11
    Posted April 9th, 2012 at 3:46 pm | # |

    omg! thank you thank you for this recipe!
    my mom died when i was young & i never knew the name of this recipe.
    i’ve been searching for years! i use to sit on the counter next to the stove & she would let me tear the dough & drop it into the water. thanks so much again, i cannot wait to make this! :]]]

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted April 9th, 2012 at 9:34 pm | # |

      oh…” i use to sit on the counter next to the stove & she would let me tear the dough & drop it into the water..” I’m touched by your story. Thanks for telling us about it…. Now you can make delicious sujebi by yourself! Your mom would be proud of you!!!

  13. marlei Germany My profile page joined 11/11
    Posted March 30th, 2012 at 6:37 pm | # |

    Hi, Maangchi. Thank you for sharing your recipes, I really enjoying them! I have a question, can I substitute dried kelp with dried seaweed? I live in Germany and closest asian market is hours away from me. Thank you!

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted March 31st, 2012 at 4:54 pm | # |

      “can I substitute dried kelp with dried seaweed?” no. If dried kelp is not available, skip it. It will still be delicious because of dried anchovy stock.

  14. migencluz Phoenix, AZ, USA / Antipolo City, Philippines My profile page joined 8/11
    Posted January 7th, 2012 at 11:56 pm | # |

    HI!!! It’s me again! HALO HALO!
    I have another question!
    Is that dough good for pulling noodles, as in those long strips?

  15. MokU Brasil My profile page joined 11/11
    Posted November 22nd, 2011 at 11:05 am | # |

    hello maangchi , i follow your instructions about the dough , but this be glue and i cant make this be more hard , what should i do?

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted December 14th, 2011 at 9:23 am | # |

      If the sujebi dough is too sticky for you to handle well, put some water on your hands before stretching and tearing the dough. Or if you want, add more flour to the dough and knead it.

  16. keikei91 new york My profile page joined 11/11
    Posted November 16th, 2011 at 3:48 pm | # |

    hello maangchi, i knead the dough with my hands and its really sticky. is it cause i may put to much water in it?

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted December 14th, 2011 at 9:24 am | # |

      If the sujebi dough is too sticky for you to handle well, put some water on your hands before stretching and tearing the dough. If you want, add more flour to the dough and knead it.

  17. Ildinha Curitiba PR-Brasil My profile page joined 11/11
    Posted November 5th, 2011 at 12:39 pm | # |

    Honey, I was thrilled to read your story about your grandmother. I feel the same way, if you knew that grandparents died, I would have been much closer to her, but I thought it was an angel, so immortal … she was and were only memories. I have a very old recipe from it, which is delicious. It is a famous Ukrainian soup. If you want I can send you. will be a joy.
    a big hug and I was his fan.
    Ilda Mara

  18. tokidoki stuck in the clouds My profile page joined 10/11
    Posted October 19th, 2011 at 11:18 pm | # |

    나는 멸치를 뛸 수있다면 안녕하세요 제가 궁금해서, 내가 지금 무슨을 위해 그것을 대체할 수 있을까? 도움 주셔서 감사합니다!

  19. 1443sejong Salt Lake City Utah My profile page joined 4/11
    Posted August 14th, 2011 at 10:33 pm | # |

    Made 김치 수제비 last night and for dinner today-soooooo good!!!! My noodles are still a bit thick, but I will have to practice at that. :)

    감사합니다 Maangchi!!!

  20. migencluz Phoenix, AZ, USA / Antipolo City, Philippines My profile page joined 8/11
    Posted August 9th, 2011 at 7:48 pm | # |

    I will try to make it tomorrow i guess. If i make the noodle dough, could i refrigerate it then just use it when i need it, or does it have to beeaten in a certain amount of time? (it is me by the way… Halo halo)

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted October 21st, 2011 at 4:14 pm | # |

      Halo halo! : )
      You can refrigerate the dough but you will have to knead for a minute before using it.

      • migencluz Phoenix, AZ, USA / Antipolo City, Philippines My profile page joined 8/11
        Posted January 7th, 2012 at 11:44 pm | # |

        Thanks. Lol Sorry if I replied so late! I was just busy in school! Thank you again!

  21. Wikkee Australia My profile page joined 4/10
    Posted July 17th, 2011 at 5:10 am | # |

    Hi Maangchi!!!. It’s so cold and raining in Sydney today and all I could think of was your kimchi sujebi!! My Korean gave me their homemade kimchi and it’s soo yummy and sour so I used that to make it. It’s the first time I made this sujebi and it’s so easy and yummy and absolutely perfect for today’s gloomy weather!! My boyfriend ate sooooo much of it and kept asking for more hahahahahaha!! He even stile some noodles from my bowl!! Anyways I’d just like to thank you for yet another great quick and easy recipes :) loved it!!!

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted July 17th, 2011 at 12:16 pm | # |

      A bow of sujebi on a rainy day sounds awesome! Thank you for your cute story about sujebi! : )

  22. Cheonyong Indonesia My profile page joined 4/11
    Posted April 26th, 2011 at 5:37 am | # |

    Maangchi, I think I’ll make this for tomorrow dinner…
    but I afraid my dorm friends won’t be suitable to anchovy and kelp stock….
    can I substitute it with chicken or beef stock?
    which one better?
    chicken or beef?
    hehee….
    thanks for your recipes maangchi…
    really made my mouth water everytime I open them,,,,

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted April 26th, 2011 at 11:39 am | # |

      I would choose clear chicken stock! Good luck with making delicious sujebi!

    • Cheonyong Indonesia My profile page joined 4/11
      Posted April 27th, 2011 at 8:44 am | # |

      Maangchi, I did it…
      It’s very nice…
      and I even take the photo of it!
      :)
      and, I have some problem….
      My noodles taste like raw flour…
      did I do something wrong while making it?
      but the rest is very good….:)

      • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
        Posted April 27th, 2011 at 8:56 am | # |

        You made it! Nice! Making your noodles more chewy is very simple. Knead the dough longer. The longer you knead it, the more chewy it is. “..Knead by hand for 10-15 minutes until the dough gets softer and sticks together firmly.”

        • Cheonyong Indonesia My profile page joined 4/11
          Posted April 27th, 2011 at 12:22 pm | # |

          okay maangchi….
          the chicken stock turn out great and my dorm friend eating like no tommorow!
          :)
          I think I’ll knead it more next time..
          hehe
          thank you for the recipe…
          I’ll cook another food for my friends tomorrow.
          and I’m sure that I’ll take it from one of your recipe!
          Thank you

          • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
            Posted April 27th, 2011 at 12:25 pm | # |

            “.. my dorm friend eating like no tomorrow!” lol lol, u know I love funny expression!

            • Cheonyong Indonesia My profile page joined 4/11
              Posted April 27th, 2011 at 1:09 pm | # |

              Me too maangchi…
              like when I see your hoobakjuk video.
              one of your comment
              “If my house were on fire, I’ll take this balls first and then run out”
              it really made me laugh out and hard to stop, even my dorm friends come to my room, being afraid if I were poisoned by some kind of laughing mushroom or something…

  23. oksipak California My profile page joined 1/11
    Posted February 11th, 2011 at 8:09 pm | # |

    Can anyone say, DELICIOUS? Made this for dinner tonight, both versions, and I had a cup of both styles. Thanks Maangchi for the recipes.

  24. healthysaver USA My profile page joined 2/10
    Posted January 19th, 2011 at 5:02 pm | # |

    Hi Maangchi,
    I want to make enough to have leftover and was wondering does the noodle stay good in soup? Some noodles will expand and lose the flavor. Or how long can I store leftover dough in the fridge? Thank you so much for your videos and tutorials.

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted January 20th, 2011 at 6:42 am | # |

      “does the noodle stay good in soup?” No, as you say, the noodles will expand and lose the chewy texture. ” how long can I store leftover dough in the fridge?” It will be ok in the fridge for a couple of days.

  25. lexyoh new york My profile page joined 12/10
    Posted December 25th, 2010 at 2:44 am | # |

    love love love the dough noodle muahhhhh”fantastico delisyoso

  26. opathebat Indonesia My profile page joined 10/10
    Posted October 19th, 2010 at 12:31 am | # |

    My friend ever told me about sujebi and I didn’t have any idea about that.
    After read it, then I think Aaah it’s so easy..
    I can’t wait to cook the hot spicy kimchi sujebi..
    Thanks Maangchi :)

  27. bubblepink My profile page joined 9/10
    Posted September 29th, 2010 at 10:33 pm | # |

    Hi Maangchi,

    Thanks for all your recipes. I’m living in Western Australia n my husband is a Korean. It’s hard to find good korean food here, we went to many korean restaurants but my husband hardly find anything decent. And he misses Korean food much.
    But then I found your recipes and now he hardly wanna go out for Korean food hahaha..even one day he said “Should we open a Korean restaurant?” hahaha and I thought “I should get a franchise from Maangchi!!!” hahaha

    Anyway I wanna ask if I can knife-cut the dough (like in kalguksu) and use the same spicy soup recipe in sujebi or it will be weird? Is kalguksu very different from Sujebi?

    Thanks Maangchi

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted September 30th, 2010 at 8:11 am | # |

      “Should we open a Korean restaurant?” Awesome idea! “.. can knife-cut the dough (like in kalguksu) and use the same spicy soup recipe in sujebi or it will be weird?” It sounds very delicious!

    • PaullyG Perth, Australia My profile page joined 8/11
      Posted September 25th, 2011 at 6:37 am | # |

      A late reply I know but I suggest you check out Took Bae Kee on Barracks St. in the Perth CBD (Just up from Wellington St on the western side). It’s only a little place and gets packed around peak times, but the food, service and cleanliness of the establishment is all of a high standard and the prices are very reasonable.

  28. mokpochica Michigan My profile page I'm a fan! joined 1/09
    Posted September 27th, 2010 at 11:20 am | # |

    We had sujebi for dinner last night. I had to make quite a few substitutions, so it didn’t end up tasting like the sujebi I am familiar with, but it was good.

    My subs were: soup soy sauce and a little oyster sauce instead of fish sauce, miyuk instead of kelp and extra onion since I had no green onion on hand. I also added black pepper.

    A question for you…I bought oyster sauce for jjamppong, which I will make again. But what other recipes call for oyster sauce? I want to find ways to use it up.

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted September 28th, 2010 at 1:04 am | # |

      I use it when I make bokkeumbap (stir-fried rice) and stir-fried vegetables such as bok choy, Chinese broccoli, etc. In a heated pan, add some vegetable oil with crushed garlic,and stir fry with green vegetables. Then use oyster sauce to salt.
      If you want, leave your question on the forum. My other readers may give you good advice, too. http://www.maangchi.com/talk/forum/general-discussion

  29. jaylivg Houston My profile page I'm a fan! joined 7/10
    Posted September 8th, 2010 at 10:43 pm | # |

    i never made kim chi before , would it be okay just to use store bought kim chi to make this sujebi ??

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted September 28th, 2010 at 1:05 am | # |

      yes, of course it will be ok. delicious!

      • jaylivg Houston My profile page I'm a fan! joined 7/10
        Posted October 13th, 2010 at 7:35 pm | # |

        Maangchi , i just made sujebi tonight ..
        it was delicious !! I doubled the recipe because it said on the recipe for 1 serving . I doubled it so me and my husband can eat it .. Turned out we have leftovers !! LOL .. And to think me and my husband had 2 bowls each of sujebi , and still leftovers !!

        Thank you for another great recipe , this soup is so good for cooler weather like this :

  30. debbiesther My profile page joined 9/10
    Posted September 8th, 2010 at 1:32 am | # |

    Hi Maangchi,
    I tried this recipe today for brunch because it looked so appetizing and also because I looooove noodles. I did the non-spicy one because my sister can’t take spicy stuff. I didn’t have time to go out to the market and I didn’t have anchovies or anchovy stock cubes, so I substituted it with a chicken stock cube instead. I also skipped on the kelp. Making the noodles was time-consuming but very fun! My noodles came out a bit thick, but I think my family forgives me for it because I’m only 13 and I don’t cook very often :) The soup was delicious, and the fish sauce gave it a little twang, which was awesome! Definitely going to make this again soon! Thanks for the awesome recipe!
    -Debbie

  31. ramen_kimchi My profile page joined 8/10
    Posted August 12th, 2010 at 12:17 am | # |

    Hi,I’m trying to cook this today but I dont have kelp..wonder if it’s ok to go without it? I like to do the spicy one

  32. lillamy85 Sweden My profile page joined 7/10
    Posted July 12th, 2010 at 3:49 pm | # |

    Hi Maangchi!

    First post..:)

    I have a question regarding the spicy one. It says it should be garlic in the ingredients, but I can’t see that you use it in the video. Should it be galic or is it optional? If garlic- how much?

    Sincerely Emma

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted July 12th, 2010 at 5:29 pm | # |

      welcome, Emma!
      non-spicy sujebi needs garlic, but kimchi sujebi doesn’t because it already has lots of garlic in it.

  33. Brian_Montoya Colorado Springs,Colorado My profile page joined 12/09
    Posted July 8th, 2010 at 2:56 am | # |

    Yum i love the kimchi sujaebi i always make it when i have old kimchi laying around, but i use powdered chicken broth instead of anchovies!

  34. Junjin Hong Kong My profile page joined 7/10
    Posted July 7th, 2010 at 5:19 am | # |

    Hi, Maangchi,

    Actually, I left message to you firstly on July 1st. It was my first Hello. (but I can’t it, I may made mistake)

    Just want to say that I’m happy to know the recipe of sujebi. Why? It is because I have known this dishes from a Korean TV drama (육남매) and a Korean TV show – Infinite Challenge(무한도전). In the show, MC Yu (유재석) made it and won in that chapter. I want to make it too.

    Anyway, I will try this later. Update to you then.

    Have a nice day!

  35. Junjin Hong Kong My profile page joined 7/10
    Posted July 7th, 2010 at 5:03 am | # |

    Hi, Maangchi,

    I have watched the “Kimchi Contest” from youtube. Many people can make tasty Kimchi. Really hope I can be one of them!

  36. stephiephie My profile page joined 6/10
    Posted June 8th, 2010 at 4:46 am | # |

    Hello maangchi! i’m a silent reader of your blog. Today i tried making the spicy sujebi. OMG ITS PHENOMENAL! love it! it’s really different from the chinese ones my mummy always make! :D thank you so much for your recipes! :D

  37. bluebaby137 California/Michigan My profile page joined 6/09
    Posted May 1st, 2010 at 9:59 pm | # |

    Hi Maangchi,
    I’ve already tried and made SOOO many dishes from your recipe. All of my friend LOVE it! you made your video so simple to follow. I made Sujebi many months ago, and I just tried again recently. I just wanna tell you it turned out delicious like usual, and THANK YOU so much for the recipe.

    Cathy

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted May 2nd, 2010 at 7:57 am | # |

      Cathy,
      yay! good news! Sujebi is very easy to make and the ingredients are very simple. Wonderful!

  38. yaymeluvme123 My profile page joined 4/10
    Posted April 19th, 2010 at 6:51 pm | # |

    i’m not korean but i am asian. i really enjoyed this recipe cause it was extremely easy unlike some korean or any recipes. it was really good since i am also a kim chee lover :)

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted April 19th, 2010 at 10:05 pm | # |

      Welcome to my website!! If you can make this recipe easily, I’m sure you can make lots of other recipes, too. Cheers!

  39. jack
    Posted December 31st, 2009 at 9:59 am | # |

    Hi Maangchi,

    My grandmother makes it with an egg in the dough(This was in Malaysia). As some people say, the flour varies from place to place. I tried using a breadmaker to make the dough as well. If you knead the dough by hand, sometimes you need to slowly add water to get the right consistency. From my trial and error, sometimes, the initial dough is a bit stringy when you pull on it, but after leaving it out for a while, it becomes more stretchy, without the having stringy bits when you pull it to tear. I leave it to stand for a while, covering it with a cloth towel. As for the soup, some of your readers mentioned a meat stock. I use minced pork, anchovies as well as dried shrimp. Prefrying the soaked dried shrimp brings out a nice aroma before making the stock.

    I am starting to explore all your recipes and my mouth is watering. Thanks!

  40. Lindy
    Posted December 27th, 2009 at 4:45 pm | # |

    Hi,

    Do I really need the vegetable oil to make the dough? I don’t have any on hand, but I really want to make this.

    Thanks, and I love the site.

  41. sirdanilot
    Posted December 13th, 2009 at 4:50 pm | # |

    It was very delicious, even though I had some problems with the dough. First, it was too sticky and watery, so I added more flour, but then I couldn’t tear proper thin noodles, so I kept adding water and flour etc. and eventually I just settled for thicker noodles. Oh well, it was still delicious… but did I do something wrong with the dough or did I just not tear them thinly enough?

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted December 13th, 2009 at 5:35 pm | # |

      It sounds like you already learned a lot from making sujebi! The measurement for the dough is very exact, so next time if you make it again,follow the directions closely. The longer you knead the dough, the better result you will have. I’m sure your next sujebi will be much better. All you need is more practice. Thank you!

      • Ethan
        Posted December 20th, 2009 at 7:25 pm | # |

        Hi Maangchi,

        I’m not sure that following precise measurements is the right advice. For pasta and other doughs the conventional wisdom is that the cook needs to play it by ear. The flour to water ratio has so many variables that can effect the correct amounts: humidity, the hardness of the flour, how packed or loose the flour is, etc.

        I started with maybe a tablespoon or so less water than the recipe called for and found even then I needed to add a bit more flour.

  42. Jenny
    Posted December 8th, 2009 at 11:07 pm | # |

    Thank you so much! I’ve been trying to cook korean food for a long time. I tried using the korean cook books but since my korean is limited, I found it a little confusing. You saved my life! =)

  43. Rebecca
    Posted November 30th, 2009 at 6:43 am | # |

    Can I use rice flour instead of regular flour?
    Thank you so much for the recipes!! I live in Korea now and it seems that many of my friends don’t know how to make a lot of the food you make. Everytime I ask if they can make something, they say, “No, but my mom can.” I’ve told some of my friends about your site. Keep up the great work and recipes!! ^^

  44. Elaine
    Posted November 14th, 2009 at 1:44 pm | # |

    Hey Maangchi, this recipe is really very similar to what we have in Malaysia called, Pan Mee. It is also hand-torn noodles boiled in broth but the only difference is that we add a bit of meat sauce topping over the top. :)

    Your Sujebi looks delicious btw, especially the spicy kimchi version! This reminds me, I have to make another batch of your kimchi soon, i’m running out.

  45. Chinese Noodle Recipes
    Posted November 10th, 2009 at 11:12 pm | # |

    Wow, the cooking method of this noodle soup is cool, the cooking pics are so hd that i can easily follow. I’ll try it later and I hope it tastes the way it look. Thanks for sharing!

  46. Nana
    Posted October 31st, 2009 at 11:02 pm | # |

    Hey Maangchi just want to say thanks for everything you do! I really enjoy your breaded cod recipe as well as the ones for tofu, they were so yummy! Anyway, I made the mild sujebi today, but my soup base came out really bland. It tasted like hot water >< so I was wondering if I should add more fish sauce?? Thank you for reading!

  47. Missy
    Posted October 26th, 2009 at 3:56 pm | # |

    Thank You, Maangchi!My husband loves spicy sujebi. We couldn’t find any local Houston restaurants who knew or were willing to make the spicy version. I’m making it tonight for dinner. He’ll be so happy.

    p.s. If you know how to make Andong chicken, a dish that’s slightly spicy and includes cellophane noodles, potatoes and carrots, I’d love the recipe. That was one of our favorite dishes to eat when we lived in Seoul.

    You’re the best! Keep these great recipes coming.

  48. Reina
    Posted October 26th, 2009 at 2:01 am | # |

    Hello Maangchi,

    First thank you very much for all your delicious recipes!!! Thank you for sharing and teaching me to cook Korean food. It’s really fun to learn to cook Korean dishes, especially since they are healthier than my own traditional foods,very much lower in fats.

    ButI need help!!!!! I’m Puerto Rican but my boyfreind is Korean, his name is Sae Hoon. He is hypertensive and he loves ramen :(, and duk bookie, and all soups. My questions are:

    1. Is it possible to make home make ramen/soup stocks that are lower in salt at home? (I’ll make make or buy my own noodle)

    2. Do you have any tips on cooking with less salt or salt substitutes?(Cuz the bean and chilli pastes are somtimes salty)

    3. Any recipe or other suggestions?

    Thank you Maangchi , very very much!!

  49. Hope
    Posted October 20th, 2009 at 7:59 pm | # |

    I cut the potatoes too small and it turned into potato porridge sujebi :(

  50. Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
    Posted October 16th, 2009 at 8:26 pm | # |

    Hi, sujebi people! ; )
    Someone asked me through my email about sujebi dough and I answered her with this. I think this information might be useful for you.
    “You can keep the dough up to 5 days in the refrigerator (maybe 1 week?), so you don’t have to cook right after making the dough. When you tear it widely and thinly, if the dough is too sticky to tear easily, put some water on your hands, then it will be easier.”

  51. Kelly
    Posted October 15th, 2009 at 11:12 pm | # |

    I use exact ingredients for the dough and it was so sticky that I couldn’t knead at all. I don’t know whether the dough can still be used. What’s the purpose of keeping dough in the refrigerator?

  52. Mars
    Posted October 15th, 2009 at 11:16 am | # |

    Maangchi, the pot that you have the Hot spicy kimchi sujebi in, what do you call that pot? I am trying to find one. I heard the name Naembi? Is that correct? My mother had a small one she used to cook ramen and kimchi in, but my sister took it before I got a hold of it!!

    I am hoping to find one at an Asian market, but the one close to me is small, but still hoping!!

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted October 15th, 2009 at 11:39 am | # |

      yes, the tin pot is called “yangeun naembi”:양은 냄비 in Korean.
      I will post the photo on the kitchenware section soon. It’s sold at a Korean grocery store and very cheap.

      • Mars
        Posted October 15th, 2009 at 11:47 am | # |

        Thanks soooo much Maangchi!! You are the greatest!

  53. Roxanne
    Posted October 14th, 2009 at 10:12 pm | # |

    watching this really makes me want to cook again, especially this lol
    hopefully i’ll be able to make one that looks that delicious when my new kitchen is all done! XD

  54. thaory
    Posted October 14th, 2009 at 5:16 pm | # |

    hey maangchi, what if i just pull it and make them into nooddles.. does that make ramyun ?

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted October 15th, 2009 at 9:56 am | # |

      Ramyun is made by machine and I don’t know the recipe. You can make “kalguksu (knife-cut noodle soup)” with this dough.

  55. D
    Posted October 14th, 2009 at 9:51 am | # |

    Lastly, how about substituting sweet potatoes for regular potatoes?

  56. Angie
    Posted October 13th, 2009 at 3:50 pm | # |

    I made this and it was amazing! My mother used to make this for me when I lived at home, but now that I live in another state I can make it myself! I didn’t want to use anchovies, so I used a little bit of beef sliced really thin. I also added a tiny bit of dashida and it was amazing! Thanks for posting!

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted October 13th, 2009 at 7:04 pm | # |

      Great! Some people who can’t eat dried anchovies will get some idea from your comment. Thanks!

  57. Anonymous
    Posted October 13th, 2009 at 12:13 pm | # |

    !. Can I used whole wheat flour OR whole wheat PASTRY flour for the dough?

    2. Can the noodle recipe be made 1 or 2 days advance?

  58. vb
    Posted October 13th, 2009 at 6:43 am | # |

    The sujebi shop was closed for many days for the chusok holidays so i did not get to eat it but my husband who is on a short term posting in seoul ate a few times and he said that it is really good! What a pity I missed it! Yes, i know, I know, I should mk it at home…….. Maangchu, if only I were your neighbour!!!!!

  59. Kerri
    Posted October 12th, 2009 at 10:13 pm | # |

    I made subeji this morning. I used large anchovies and it was exciting to pinch them open and remove the insides, just like in your videos! Each anchovy just popped open and the guts were very easy to remove. They just brushed right out. I brushed out some of the backbones too, but I don’t think that mattered.

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted October 13th, 2009 at 8:52 am | # |

      Thank you for leaving your comment here again. Your explanation about how to remove the anchovy guts is very funny. : )

      • Kerri
        Posted October 13th, 2009 at 2:29 pm | # |

        Hahaha, thank you. Once I found out how easy it was, I wanted to pop open all of the anchovies in the pack. It’s pretty fun.

        • Angie
          Posted October 13th, 2009 at 3:48 pm | # |

          Well maybe you can pop open all the ones I have!! That part really creeps me out! :)

  60. Kelly
    Posted October 12th, 2009 at 6:58 am | # |

    Pardon me for my ignorance, I feel amazed when I saw you knead the dough using a food processor. I didn’t know there is such a function. May I know what brand of food processor I should get to knead the dough, it can help saving this lazy girl.

  61. rv65
    Posted October 12th, 2009 at 3:17 am | # |

    For the kimchi version when should I add the egg?

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted October 12th, 2009 at 9:58 am | # |

      at the end, just before eating.
      The soup is very hot, so the egg will be being cooked while you are eating the sujebi.

  62. Titanite
    Posted October 11th, 2009 at 2:52 pm | # |

    Hi there! We do the same in Singapore too! There we call it “mee hoon kuay” : dough pieces, literally. Thanks for this, I’ll definitely try out the Korean version. ;)

  63. jcsg
    Posted October 11th, 2009 at 1:30 am | # |

    Oh and why do you use the head and body of the anchovies for the first soup but only the body for the second one?? TIA!

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted October 11th, 2009 at 8:28 am | # |

      You can use the heads in kimchi sujebi, but it will take longer to pick them out. If you make more than 2 servings, put all heads and bodies (oops!) into a tea strainer as I showed in my mild sujebi recipe.

  64. jcsg
    Posted October 11th, 2009 at 1:27 am | # |

    I realised that for both recipe, you didn’t add any meat of any sort. Is that how you all eat it in Korea or is that a personal preference??;)

    For the Chinese way, it is pretty similar to the Korean style, just that we commonly use pork ribs to make the stock instead of anchovies:)

    Cuisines really are ‘across boundaries':)

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted October 11th, 2009 at 8:32 am | # |

      Some people use clams or chicken. I love the flavor of the stock made with dried anchovies.

  65. emmy
    Posted October 10th, 2009 at 9:54 pm | # |

    Hi Maangchi! Thank you for such a wonderful recipe and your great website! I tried Sujebi today- didn’t have potatoes so I used radish instead. It was delicious! I will try it with potatoes next time! :)

  66. Libelle
    Posted October 10th, 2009 at 3:42 am | # |

    Maangchi ssi, annyeong! Hubby and I enjoy watching your videos so very much! Thanks again for a great recipe! We will make your recipe soon, but on today’s menu is hobak juk, the weather is perfectly autumn out and hobak juk will go well with it! ^^
    Kamsahamnida! *hugs*

  67. at
    Posted October 10th, 2009 at 12:55 am | # |

    NEW knife!! ;-)

  68. Kateri
    Posted October 10th, 2009 at 12:16 am | # |

    That looks delicious! If I can’t find dried anchovies, what can I use instead?

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted October 10th, 2009 at 12:23 pm | # |

      It’s a good question! I used dried anchovies and dried kelp to make stock in this recipe, but you can use chicken or beef stock too.

  69. Mike
    Posted October 9th, 2009 at 8:40 pm | # |

    That looks really yummy,I’m drooling right now,I’m going to try and make it,I like the spicy one,Thanks.

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted October 10th, 2009 at 12:27 pm | # |

      : ) How did your sujebi turn out? I talked to my sister living in CA over the phone yesterday. She was watching my sujebi video. I asked her what she was going to make for dinner and she said, “I want to make sujebi right now!”

  70. Ariel
    Posted October 9th, 2009 at 8:23 pm | # |

    This looks great!
    There’s a Chinese version of this, minus the kimchi, and with different ingredients, but the dough is done in exactly the same way…I wonder if it’ll taste the same =)

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted October 10th, 2009 at 12:33 pm | # |

      oh, yeah? I heard that from a few other my YouTube viewers. Chinese version also tear the dough like this? If so, I’m very interested in the recipe. Leave the recipe here if you want:
      http://www.maangchi.com/talk/forum/reader-recipes

      • Jasmine
        Posted November 9th, 2009 at 9:54 am | # |

        hi Maangchi! thanks for ur recipe!
        the Chinese recipe uses pork ribs to make the stock..i havent tried using kelp..i used soy beans instead to make the soup stock..and i add some sliced shitake mushrooms..its amazing! me and my sis love it!

  71. Thaory
    Posted October 9th, 2009 at 5:55 pm | # |

    HAH! First~

    i just had a feeling that you will post a new recipe today ^^

    This is into my to do list looks so good!!!


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