Recipes

Butternut squash porridge

Hobakjuk 호박죽

Many people think the Korean word hobak (호박) means pumpkin, but it actually means squash. A pumpkin is really a kind of squash. So in Korea, we make this recipe with pumpkins. But here in the West I can’t easily find the kind of pumpkin Koreans use for hobakjuk. So I learned to make it out of butternut squash, which is available everywhere here.

The recipe for Hobakjuk needs only a few ingredients. But making the small rice cake balls takes some time. I recommend you make the rice cake balls with your family members or friends together. Whenever I make this porridge, I remember my grandmother and my family members. We all made the rice cake balls together. I miss them and all of us who had a great time while making the rice cake balls!

Ingredients: 2 or 3 small butternut squash, water, salt, sugar, sweet rice flour.

How to prepare butternut squash:

  1. Wash the exterior of the butternut squashes in cold water.
  2. Cut the squash in half lengthwise and remove the seeds and stringy stuff with a spoon.
  3. Place the butternut squash in a large pot. Pour 3 cups of water over them and bring to a boil over medium high heat for 30 minutes, until the contents become soft.
  4. Turn off the heat and let it cool down.
  5. When it’s cooled down, scrape the cooked insides out with a spoon.
  6. Place 3 cups of the cooked squash insides into a large pot and add 4 or 5 cups of water and boil

Make rice cake balls:

  1. Boil some water.
  2. Make rice cake dough by mixing 2 cups of sweet rice flour, ¼ ts salt, and ¾ cup of hot water. Mix it up with a wooden spoon at first, and then knead it for a few minutes with your hand after it cools down.
  3. Wrap the dough in plastic wrap and set it aside for about 20-30 minutes.
  4. Put about 3 tbs of sweet rice flour into a large bowl (this will prevent the rice cake balls from sticking together).
  5. Take a bit of dough and roll a rice cake ball (the size should be a little larger than soy bean). Put it into the bowl with the sweet rice flour.riceballs
    *tip: to prevent the dough from getting dried out, always wrap the dough in plastic wrap while you are making the rice cake balls

Let’s make porridge!

  1. When the mixture of squash and water starts boiling, add the rice cake balls to the pot. Stir it with a wooden spoon and cook it for a few more minutes.
    *tip: when it’s cooked, all the rice cake balls will be floating on the surface of the porridge.
  2. Turn off the heat and add 1 ts salt and ¼ cup of sugar and stir it for a few seconds before serving.

Yayee! You made butternut squash porridge!

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164 Comments:

  1. ipontchi indonesia My profile page joined 5/14
    Posted May 29th, 2014 at 12:36 am | # |

    Hi maangchi, what if I change the water with milk, it will taste good? Thank you :))

  2. weirdingway San Diego, CA My profile page joined 11/11
    Posted February 1st, 2014 at 11:20 pm | # |

    I was feeling homey tonight, so instead of going out I decided to make hobakjuk. I used kabocha for this one. It finally got a little cool in San Diego today so it was perfect for dinner!

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted February 2nd, 2014 at 3:20 pm | # |

      “I was feeling homey tonight, so instead of going out I decided to make hobakjuk.” I love it! : )

  3. brooks540 Virginia My profile page joined 9/12
    Posted September 21st, 2013 at 8:35 pm | # |

    A friend just gave me a Korean pumpkin that she grew this year, now I know what to make. Can’t wait to try this!

  4. purpleshammrock california My profile page joined 9/12
    Posted September 25th, 2012 at 2:40 pm | # |

    so glad to find this recipe. A friend gave me 2 of this large butternut squash and I had no idea what to do with it. I can’t wait to try this! BTW, I have made cubed radishes and Kimchi over the weekend and it looked and smelled so good. Can’t wait to taste it, my family is really impressed. Thank you so much Maangchi for sharing your cooking.

    Dee

  5. ijil Maine My profile page joined 9/12
    Posted September 16th, 2012 at 2:06 pm | # |

    How much sweet rice flour should I use and how if I wanted to skip the rice cake balls?

  6. janicedale Australia My profile page joined 2/12
    Posted May 3rd, 2012 at 7:48 pm | # |

    I’ve tasted this similar to this recipe which is pumpkin soup. The pumpkin soup has croutons to add texture for the soup. It’ll be my first time to try butternut squash porridge with the main ingredients is a rice cake ball. I guess the taste would be the same, the only different is the rice cake ball.

  7. lovekpop2689 murrieta My profile page joined 1/12
    Posted January 28th, 2012 at 2:15 am | # |

    hi maangchi !!!
    I were dying from looking at your yummy soup but there no way for me to get the porridge, can i use sweet potatoes instead. i will tried to find the porridge, i’ve been looking for it like 3 days already soooo ^ ( ^

    Thanks A Lot

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted January 28th, 2012 at 4:04 pm | # |

      hmm, I don’t know. hope it turns out good. If you make it, let me know the result. : )

      • lovekpop2689 murrieta My profile page joined 1/12
        Posted January 29th, 2012 at 12:46 am | # |

        Hi Maangchi !!!

        i will make it tomorrow, hopefully that it will turn out nicely.
        thanks a lot ^>^

  8. jordanmattes Arlington, WA, USA My profile page joined 11/11
    Posted December 28th, 2011 at 1:48 am | # |

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kabocha

    Is this the same as the “hobak” in Korea? It’s easy to find here in Washington, I hope you eventually found it where you are!

  9. mokpochica Michigan My profile page I'm a fan! joined 1/09
    Posted October 16th, 2011 at 9:56 am | # |

    I just love this recipe and make it a lot in the fall, but I am not really satisfied with my ddeok. I think I am making the dough too wet because they just don’t seem to have the right texture after I cook them. I think they are too wet and not chewy enough. My husband says that his mother made hobak jook with wheat flour sometimes–she made the dumplings flat, like in sujebi. I tried that once and it was good. The ddeok in hobak jook and kimchi jeon are just two dishes I have a lot of trouble with and can’t seem to master. My husband does these much better than me, so maybe I should just let them be his thing, but truthfully–it really bothers me!

  10. Toto Bonn, Germany My profile page joined 6/10
    Posted September 24th, 2011 at 2:37 pm | # |

    Oh I love squash and pumpkin :) it reminds me to autumn. This porridge is a really nice harvest food, I think :D
    I’ve got a question: could you post, someday, how to make hobaktteok?
    Thank you really much and 감사합니다 :)

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted September 25th, 2011 at 11:14 am | # |

      ” This porridge is a really nice harvest food, I think :D” yeah, that’s true! I’m always excited to see different kinds, colors, and sizes of pumpkins and squashes in the fall.

      Hobaktteok (pumpkin rice cake) is included in the list of my upcoming recipes. Thanks!

  11. mochilliboo My profile page joined 5/11
    Posted May 18th, 2011 at 12:11 am | # |

    thank you maangchi! i love hobakjuk…but i must admit…when i’m lazy i use jarred butternut squash babyfood! it works pretty well! i have one question…

    i had some mochiko (japanese brand)flour at home so i made it with that…but after the porridge sits in the fridge…the rice flour thins out and its not thick anymore, even when i heat it back up again! what am i doing wrong and how do i prevent this? thanks so much!

  12. JamieF New Zealand My profile page I'm a fan! joined 1/11
    Posted April 20th, 2011 at 5:44 am | # |

    I made this tonight – it was very delicious! Making the rice cake balls took a long long time as I had to do it on my own. But it was worth it. They are chewy and really add a great texture to the smooth porridge.

  13. estkang My profile page joined 3/11
    Posted March 14th, 2011 at 2:18 pm | # |

    Hi! I enjoy your website. It’s so helpful for a newlywed such a myself! So, my in-laws are visiting us from LA next month and I want to serve this to them.

    How many people will this recipe serve?
    Can I make this without the rice cake balls? Can I boil the rice cake balls in another pot with water and serve it to those who want them??

  14. chika_adc Indonesia My profile page joined 2/11
    Posted February 27th, 2011 at 3:01 am | # |

    Hello Maangchi! I’ve search “Korean Pumpkin Porridge” and I found this site. I really want to make it. mmm.. look so delicious :D Are there other complementary foods are eaten with this porridge? please reply \(^.^)/ gamsahabnida!

  15. Mochidaifukutan Malaysia My profile page joined 2/11
    Posted February 24th, 2011 at 3:41 pm | # |

    I can’t find butternut squash here in Malaysia but pumpkins are abundant here so I think I’m going to use pumpkin!! Can’t wait to make it later on! Kamsahamnida Maangchi..

  16. Ikkin-bot edmonton My profile page joined 9/10
    Posted February 16th, 2011 at 10:34 am | # |

    When I made this I froze half the batch because it was so big and there is just me here. I recently unfroze it and heated it up on the stove and I swear it was even better the second time. The squash was just that much nicer for being triple cooked I think!

    http://ikkin-bot.blogspot.com/2011/01/hobakjuk-butternut-squash-porridge.html?showComment=1297869790454#c1523516062317273580

  17. ichigo_no_powder My profile page joined 2/11
    Posted February 9th, 2011 at 11:44 pm | # |

    i tried to make this today and while the pumpkin portion was delicious, my rice balls failed. i boiled it for awhile but it was still very soft and clumped together. only a quarter of it floated to the top. any tips?

    • Ikkin-bot edmonton My profile page joined 9/10
      Posted February 16th, 2011 at 10:36 am | # |

      I didn’t have the clumping problem, but I made sure they were coated with flour when I made them. Mine didn’t really float either. However, I let it simmer/boil for a good 10 minutes and they definitely were done.

  18. Ikkin-bot edmonton My profile page joined 9/10
    Posted January 10th, 2011 at 9:50 pm | # |
  19. kunihuchi London My profile page joined 12/10
    Posted December 2nd, 2010 at 8:21 am | # |

    Is the hobakjuk suppose to taste a little salty? I added 1 Tsp of salt and also the sugar according to the instructions at the end and I find it a little salty. I was thinking that it would taste really sweet.

  20. Hana Yi Canada My profile page joined 9/10
    Posted October 6th, 2010 at 10:38 pm | # |

    I made this yammy poridge for dinner.
    It was so good :)
    My belly is happy now..
    Thank you very much, Maangchi.

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted October 7th, 2010 at 11:43 am | # |

      I’m so happy to hear that your belly is happy! : ) I should make hobakjuk for myself soon.

  21. esther nyc My profile page joined 10/10
    Posted October 3rd, 2010 at 7:53 pm | # |

    I remember my grandma had the rice cake balls, and also some different beans in hobakjuk. Do you have any suggestions what the beans might have been or would be good for this? Thank you!

  22. shanttalgeeh My profile page joined 8/10
    Posted August 1st, 2010 at 1:40 pm | # |

    Hello, Maangchi
    I was wondering to see if you can tell me what I can substitute sweet rice flour with. Because I don’t think I can get that from where I live unless I go to Toronto.
    Thanks
    Shanttalgeeh

  23. Thienmai The Netherlands My profile page joined 7/10
    Posted July 21st, 2010 at 10:17 am | # |

    I a so exited i am making it now xD

    Youre awsome !!!

  24. Laury Tan rowland heights, california My profile page I'm a fan! joined 3/10
    Posted June 12th, 2010 at 8:09 pm | # |

    maangchi, how for how many serving is this recipe?:)

  25. annesue Melbourne, Australia My profile page joined 6/10
    Posted June 10th, 2010 at 9:15 am | # |

    Hi Maangchi!
    I was just wondering if I were to skin the butternut squash first before cooking it, how much water would it need? still 4 to 5 cups?
    Also, just curious, but would the kent pumpkin be a good substitute?

  26. Stefanie Amsterdam My profile page joined 4/10
    Posted April 26th, 2010 at 8:56 am | # |

    Hi Maanchi!
    This recipe looks so good and I want to give it a try!! I was just wondering if it’s okay to make a whole bunch of the balls and then save some in the freezer? Or will they taste differently then? thx!!

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted April 26th, 2010 at 9:10 am | # |

      hmm, good question! I have never thought about freezing rice cake balls. I’m not sure the texture of rice cake balls will be the same as freshly made ones when it’s cooked though.

  27. Oneesan France My profile page joined 1/09
    Posted April 18th, 2010 at 6:03 am | # |

    Hi everyone !!!!
    Today I will made this recipe but by my way !!!!! hihihi
    But you are my inspiration Maagchi !!!! Thank You !!!! I wil made a video to show you, but shure that will not be to great ( the video not the recipe!!! Can i make the rice balls some hours before to cook the porridge or just prepar the rice base and put with plastic ??? thank you!!!!

  28. yiduckki My profile page joined 2/10
    Posted February 16th, 2010 at 8:26 am | # |

    Hi. The problem i have is that i only have cubed butternut squash. I was wondering how many cubes i should use to make a decent portion of this juk and how much water i should use with it. Im trying to use it to feed just myself for a one time thing.

  29. fun
    Posted December 7th, 2009 at 6:17 pm | # |

    Luckily my mom plants pumpkins [the kind that Korean actually uses to make hobakjuk out in her garden (actually my garage is stocked with them (my mom likes to make… well I guess the closest English term I can think of is “tea” but not even close to it)… anyways I watched the Korean variety program Family Outing and in one of the episode they made hobakjuk. Since my garage is stocked with pumpkins, I decided to make it. I am a horrible cook. The first time… uh… I don’t know what went wrong. But tonight I will be making it again, so I decided to google and google brought me here. Thank you =D

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted December 7th, 2009 at 7:55 pm | # |

      Please let me know how your hobakjuk turns out! : )

      • fun
        Posted December 17th, 2009 at 8:03 pm | # |

        I didn’t have a camera with me at the time but it was better than before. I roasted the pumpkin instead of boiling it. It turns out sweeter without the additional sugar added. Oh the rice ball was not as soft as I wanted to be but it turned out great.

        • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
          Posted December 18th, 2009 at 12:18 am | # |

          “I roasted the pumpkin instead of boiling it. It turns out sweeter without the additional sugar added” that’s a very good tip! Thank you very much!

  30. Fara
    Posted December 4th, 2009 at 6:05 am | # |

    Thank you so much for this delicate poridge.i made it ,and it was so delicious.thanks alot…Komavayo

  31. outre
    Posted October 28th, 2009 at 9:04 pm | # |

    You should see if you can find kabocha pumpkin around you. I thought about using that to make 호박죽. ㅑit has to be ripened right to get the right texture/sweetness. haven’t gotten that part right… probably because i hate waiting.

  32. Jenny L
    Posted October 16th, 2009 at 11:24 pm | # |

    Oh by the way…Maangchi–if you ever have a chance i would love to see/read your recipe for a black-sesame porridge. Thx!

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted October 17th, 2009 at 9:27 am | # |

      black sesame porridge (heug -im-ja juk:흑임자죽) is included in the list of my upcoming recipes. Thank you!

      • Anonymous
        Posted November 12th, 2009 at 12:49 am | # |

        Hi maangchi..thought i ask u if u can put in a regular korean fried chicken recipe in your upcoming list. thnx!

  33. Jenny L
    Posted October 16th, 2009 at 11:19 pm | # |

    Hi Maangchi! I made this today and it turned out deeeeelicious! My whole family was sooo impressed and was curious how i managed to figure out how to make it! I told them (showed them) your website! Thanks for the quick and easy tasty meal!

  34. Melinda DiMauro Culp
    Posted October 12th, 2009 at 2:38 pm | # |

    Hi Maangchi!

    Can’t wait to try this!

    Melinda

    PS, My daughter LOVED your pink hair!

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted October 12th, 2009 at 7:54 pm | # |

      Melinda!
      I was wondering what you have been doing lately! I think you are still busy cooking! : ) You are such a great cook. oh, your daughter likes the pink wig? Would you tell her that I’m going to surprise her with my another wig soon.

  35. kim concepcion
    Posted September 1st, 2009 at 8:04 am | # |

    about making bibimbap..what if i dont have a gochuchang what could be the best alternatives for it?..

    cause here in the philippine its so hard to find gochuchang..tnx..

    • Miss Needle
      Posted November 6th, 2009 at 9:58 pm | # |

      I try not to eat gochujang because most of them have gluten in it and I’m intolerant to the substance. You can kind of make a faux gochujang using some miso (or daen jang — not sure if you would be able to find that in the Phillipines if you can’t find gochujang), gochugaru (chili pepper), sweetener, sesame oil and garlic. While not the same, it’s a close approximation.

  36. amanda
    Posted August 22nd, 2009 at 9:23 pm | # |

    Hi Maangchi,
    I would like to make this ahead of time.
    Can I make it early in the day and serve it for dinner?
    Will the rice balls get too soft? Should I do everything but put the rice balls in until right before it’s time to serve?

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted August 22nd, 2009 at 10:28 pm | # |

      You can do either way. Make hobakjuk and put it in the refrigerator and reheat it before serving for your dinner. If the porridge looks too thick, you can add some more water. When it boils, stir it so that it won’t burn.
      Another way is to keep the pumpkin liquid and rice balls separately and cook it right before serving.

  37. Anonymous
    Posted August 10th, 2009 at 6:12 pm | # |

    Hi!, I was wondering if i could use rice flour, instead of Sweet Rice Flour ?
    coz i couldnt find any sweet rice flour .

    • Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
      Posted August 10th, 2009 at 7:25 pm | # |

      Sweet rice flour is usually used for this porridge, but if you want to use plain rice flour, why not? Sweet rice flour is more sticky than plain rice.

  38. Toto94
    Posted August 10th, 2009 at 5:32 pm | # |

    Hi Maangchi!
    First I have to say thank you! I really like your side, because I was watching for Korean food, because I love Korea and Japan and whole Asia :)
    But I´ve got a question about the hobajuk. I live in Germany and I couldn´t find the Butternut squash, so can I use any other pumpkins?
    And also: what kind of pumpkins are regular used in Korea for this recept?
    Thanks a lot and greetings from Germany!!

  39. Jewls
    Posted July 23rd, 2009 at 3:21 pm | # |

    I was wondering if I can substitute butternut squash with the Korean pumpkin (the one that looks green on the outside, but yellow in the inside) for this recipe. If I can, how many pumpkins do I use?

  40. Anonymous
    Posted April 26th, 2009 at 9:12 pm | # |

    ahhh i think if i try to make this my rice cake balls are going to turn out really big…
    is there an easier way to make this maangchi??

  41. Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
    Posted March 3rd, 2009 at 7:48 pm | # |

    Deborah,
    Wow, visiting Korea in May will be wonderful! Eat lots of delicious food and send me some photos! : )
    here is my buchujeon recipe.
    http://www.maangchi.com/recipe/vegetable-pancake-with-asian-chives

    • Deborah
      Posted April 2nd, 2009 at 2:12 pm | # |

      Thanks, Maangchi. Very excited. Leaving on April 30. Spending lots of time in Jeolla-nam do and Gyeongsangnam do. Also Andong (Gyeongsangbuk do). I will send you some more pictures of sanchae jongshik. There is nothing more wonderful than top quality, home made gochuchang from the south country wrapped around all those fresh namul … yes, I am excited. Walking in the Korean mountains and enjoying the food afterwards – that is “Nakwon”!

  42. Deborah
    Posted March 3rd, 2009 at 3:57 pm | # |

    Maangchi: Anyong! Do you have a recipe for CHIVE PAJEON? I had it once in Korea, with minced shrimps and clams … incredible. I feel like making it but don’t have a recipe.

    My “Yobbo” and I are visiting Hanguk in May – I’ll send you some more pictures of sanchae jongshik again, this time, from another area. We will be in the Gongju region this time.

  43. Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
    Posted February 20th, 2009 at 9:49 pm | # |

    otk,
    I’m going to post porridge recipe soon! : )

  44. otk
    Posted February 20th, 2009 at 7:48 pm | # |

    this looks good , I’ll try it tomorrow !
    By the way Maangchi do you know how to make the regular korean porridge , I was watching this korean drama and they were eating porridge with green onions in it and some other things like powdered/crushed stuff , i don’t know but it seems good !

  45. Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
    Posted February 13th, 2009 at 11:09 pm | # |

    Liz,
    Yeah, it’s beautiful! Multi-grain rice in pumpkin!
    I have never made it but it doesn’t look difficult.
    ok, I will include this dish in the list of my future cooking projects. Thank you!

  46. Liz
    Posted February 13th, 2009 at 8:50 pm | # |

    I think you were talking about this to josh can you one day maybe make a video on how to make this?
    Your recipes are awesome!
    here is a picture of what i’m talking about, sorry I don’t know the name..http://i.kdaq.empas.com/imgs/qsi.tsp/5959460/0/1/A/단호박영양밥.bmp

  47. DEBORAH
    Posted February 1st, 2009 at 2:09 pm | # |

    Yes … that is it …

    So satisfying and mild tasting – even though it has a REALLY strong smell. Surprisingly sweet and mild taste. Very, very nice. That, with a bowl of patbap and I’m a happy woman.

  48. Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
    Posted January 31st, 2009 at 7:01 pm | # |

    deborah,
    I don’t know what it is. You forgot to tell me what it is called. : ) Maybe chunggukjang?
    http://www.maangchi.com/talk/topic/cheonggukjang

  49. deborah
    Posted January 31st, 2009 at 2:59 pm | # |

    I am addicted …

    Stronger smell than doenjang chigae but milder, sweeter taste …

    Ah …. heaven! And so healthy too!

    Do you have a recipe? (My neighbours are going to LOVE ME if I cook this – LOL).

  50. Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
    Posted January 19th, 2009 at 11:19 am | # |
  51. Nana O
    Posted January 19th, 2009 at 7:05 am | # |

    Could you please tell me what sweet rice flour is in Korean? I go to the korean market but I don’t think the ah jum mah will know what i’m talking about if i said “sweet rice flour” ^__^ thank you.

  52. Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
    Posted January 12th, 2009 at 7:56 am | # |

    Hazel and The Ryba Family,
    Thank you for letting me know your successful hobakjuk making! Hazel, you made medium size balls? haha, no, you are never lazy! Next time, try out smaller balls. You will see the difference. If you don’t see the difference, it will be ok. Who would care! : )
    The Ryba Family, oh, you are living in Boston area. heh, it’s near New York where I’m living!
    I think your pre-school children must have fun while making this. Wonderful.

  53. The Ryba Family
    Posted January 11th, 2009 at 12:19 pm | # |

    Our pre-school had an international cooking month and asked volunteers to make a dish from their country of origin that tne 4 year olds could help with. Due to food allergies in the school, we could not use dairy, eggs, wheat, nuts, meat, seafood or peanuts. AAARGH! I was seriously stressing until I found your recipe for hobakjuk. The kids all loved making the tiny rice flour balls and I had lots of requests from moms for the recipe. Thank you so much for your marvelous site! We’re going to try a new dish every week. Luckily we live in the Boston area and can find nearly all your ingredients.

  54. Hazel
    Posted January 8th, 2009 at 4:58 pm | # |

    I made this the other day! It’s very easy to make but time consuming ^^; They turned out great, everyone really liked it. I made the balls medium sized because I was lazy ^^

  55. Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
    Posted December 25th, 2008 at 7:58 am | # |
  56. DEBORAH
    Posted December 24th, 2008 at 9:56 pm | # |

    Maangchi: I have a question. I have heard that the very traditional style of making gochuchang is with ground rice … is this true? Does it have to boil for hours and hours? Could a homemade gochuchang be made in a crockpot?

  57. Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
    Posted December 20th, 2008 at 9:52 am | # |

    DEBORAH
    oh, really? I order samgyupsal or roasted makeral whenever I go to the restaurant.

  58. DEBORAH
    Posted December 19th, 2008 at 7:31 pm | # |

    Would enjoy that. Jinmirak makes a good daegu-tang. They have tour buses come in from the US over the weekends … not sure if you knew. Lots of “Kyopo” living in the US visiting Toronto go to Jinmirak. The owner also makes a good hwae dup bap. It is snowing like mad here in Toronto … hmmm, I think a nice, big jongol is what I need …

    By the way, there is a new craze here – ttokboki made with posot and no spicy – just mushrooms, onions, red peppers, seasoning … MAYOO YUMMY YUMMY.

  59. Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
    Posted December 19th, 2008 at 5:46 pm | # |

    Deborah,
    I know you recommended “jungsuhne”restaurant which is located near Finch subway station. I called Jungsuhneh and found out the location with the number you gave me.

    Other people wanted to meet in Korea town near Christie subway. So I chose “jinmirak”. I used to go to the restaurant when I lived in Toronto.

    Next time if I do another Meetup in Toronto, let’s meet! I am going to post some photos soon on my blog that I took at the meeting.

  60. Deborah
    Posted December 19th, 2008 at 4:03 pm | # |

    Maangchi, I did not make arrangements with you for Jinmirak. I had suggested Joong so Nea in North York, Toronto and had given you their number. I sent you a separate e-mail to your a/c with my e-mail information …

    I know there is another Deborah with whom you are in correspondence – saw the UTube. This is not me! I had recommended to you Joong so Nea and did not make plans to meet at Bloor and Christie … “miyan hamindah” Wrong Deborah here … (I never stand people up)!

  61. Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
    Posted December 18th, 2008 at 5:40 pm | # |

    DEBORAH
    Where have you been? You didn’t come to our Toronto Meetup! We met at Jinmirak restaurant located in near Christie subway. I did not know your email address, so all I could do was waiting for your email. : )
    Keep checking my blog where I usually post what I’m doing.

  62. DEBORAH
    Posted December 18th, 2008 at 6:59 am | # |

    Chohun achim imnidah! I had lunch yesterday at Joong so Nea … I had told the owners about your website and had recommended that you try their place. Did you ever try it? I had not been there for a few weeks because I’ve been (like everyone else this time of year) running around for all sorts of stuff. Please let me know. (I am the only Soyang Saram who goes there and everyone always enquiries what I am eating, “do I REALLY like it”, while keeping a close eye on my table manners and chopstick etiquette …

    Its a very modest and unassuming looking place from the outside … but this is like being back in South Jeolla Province. I am trying to persuade them to make “ttok kalbi” (which is unique to the Gwangju area).

  63. Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
    Posted December 1st, 2008 at 7:53 pm | # |

    Lu,
    haha, of course you are not lazy! You are a hard worker learning Korean cooking eagerly!
    Thank you for the update!

  64. Lu
    Posted December 1st, 2008 at 1:40 pm | # |

    Hi, Maangchi!
    I didn’t see your reply to my question about the pumpkin in time, but I wanted to tell you that I found a real hobak in the Korean market. I combined one small hobak with one small American pumpkin, and it turned out great. They taste quite similar, I think, but the Korean hobak seems to have much more starch than a pumpkin does.

    I made my rice-cake balls a little too big, but not as big as “lazy people’s” rice-cake balls. :) It still took me an hour to make them all by myself, even though I worked quickly!

    I was surprised at how delicious this juk is since it has so little seasoning, and because I’m not that fond of squash. Thank you for showing me a recipe that will help me eat this very healthful vegetable deliciously, as you say in Korean. :D

  65. Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
    Posted November 30th, 2008 at 9:38 am | # |

    Jennifer,
    It’s funny comparison of “dime size of rice balls” : )
    Rice cake balls for hobakjuk should be very small. Yes, adding more water to the porridge is a good idea.

    Kristi,
    Good news! It’ll be good food for your 20 month old daughter. Thank you!

  66. Kristi
    Posted November 30th, 2008 at 12:57 am | # |

    I made this tonight and it turned out really well. I altered the recipe some, but I think it turned out very similar to yours. I roasted the butternut squash in the oven (at 400 degrees for 45 minutes) and I used honey instead of sugar after realizing that I didn’t have any sugar at home. I also used rice flour (ssal karu) instead of sweet/sticky rice flour (chap ssal karu) for the gyung dan.In any case, it turned out great. My husband said that it was what he was expecting last time when I made hobak jook from a different recipe and he wasn’t disappointed this time. Yay! I know my 20 month-old daughters are going to go crazy for it tomorrow morning when they eat it for breakfast.

  67. Jennifer
    Posted November 29th, 2008 at 8:11 pm | # |

    I watched your hobakjuk video again and am trying to salvage my juk. I was wrong about the size of my rice flour balls…they are more like the size of a dime. Do I just need to cook it longer?

    I added another cup of water to the hobakjuk and am cooking on medium heat to see if I can get the rice flour balls to float.

  68. Jennifer
    Posted November 29th, 2008 at 5:40 pm | # |

    Hi Maangchi!

    I love your recipes and videos! So far I have made the Korean rolled omlette and Korean pancake. I want to make Kimchi, but will wait for a little while before trying it.

    I made hobakjuk today, but may have done it wrong. Are the sweet rice flour balls supposed to be really “doughy” when the hobakjuk is finished cooking? I was really looking forward to eating this, but biting into a lump of raw dough was a turn-off.

    Possibly I made the flour balls too big? I made them a little larger than the size of a pea.

  69. Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
    Posted November 26th, 2008 at 9:39 pm | # |

    Lu,
    Please leave your question on the forum. I have never used the pumpkin for soup. http://www.maangchi.com/talk/forum/general-discussion

  70. Lu
    Posted November 26th, 2008 at 2:15 pm | # |

    Hi, Maangchi,

    I think I’m going to try to make hobakjuk this weekend, but I bought a pumpkin instead of butternut squash. It is a small, round pumpkin that is the kind used for pies. The man in the produce section of the supermarket said that it is sweeter and more flavorful than the kind of pumpkin that is sold as decoration and that it should be good for soup as well as pies. Does that sound anything like the kind of pumpkin they use in Korea? Thanks! :)

  71. Sylvia My profile page I'm a fan! joined 9/08
    Posted November 19th, 2008 at 7:13 am | # |

    Haha it is funny, English does have some peculiar expressions.
    I think the expression originates from childhood days of playing with playdough and rolling out “snakes”.
    The technique is used often in making pasta like gnocchi.

  72. Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
    Posted November 17th, 2008 at 9:28 pm | # |

    Sylvia,
    making a snake of the dough! haha,funny expression!

  73. Sylvia My profile page I'm a fan! joined 9/08
    Posted November 17th, 2008 at 4:27 pm | # |

    I made hobakjuk for the second time and it was even better than the first. I found that if I used the trick of making a snake of the dough then slicing off pieces; they were then quick and easy to roll into little balls.

  74. DEBORAH
    Posted November 16th, 2008 at 11:50 am | # |

    Do I do it with a Valley Girl accent?! (Just kidding). Tried another place in Toronto yesterday – they serve very authentic tasting Mool Nyengmun … have a machine at the back and crank out the noodles. Mmmmm. Mayoo yummy.

  75. Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
    Posted November 15th, 2008 at 6:22 pm | # |

    DEBORAH,
    “aigo” is like “oh my god” lol

  76. DEBORAH
    Posted November 15th, 2008 at 4:53 pm | # |

    I think it means someone who is patriotic or a fellow Hanguk-saram? Am I close? (Hangul-mal u kongbu hamnidah)!

  77. Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
    Posted November 13th, 2008 at 8:36 pm | # |

    DEBORAH
    aigo!(Do you know what it means? : ) ) My email address is maangchi@gmail.com. I visited Korea in May this year. You are planning to visit Korea in May in 2009! Good for you!

  78. DEBORAH
    Posted November 13th, 2008 at 8:06 pm | # |

    Hi Maangchi: Where is your e-mail address on the site? I could not find it. I will be in Korea and Japan in May of 09 – June of 09.

    Toronto is a Korean-food Gourmet’s Paradise (Nakwon)! There is another place I just thought of – they serve most of their food in dolsot – the owner makes something called Hae Mool Dolsot Bap – I never saw it in Korea or anywhere other than the restaurant here. It is exquisite and flavoured with home-made gochuchang and kae-nip … her panchan is also very much “nara” style. Look forward to meeting you – I should also introduce you to my friend Hae Sook who is another food afficionado. Best, Deborah

  79. Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
    Posted November 13th, 2008 at 6:41 am | # |

    DEBORAH,
    Thank you very much for the restaurant information. When I visit Toronto, I will try some food at the restaurant. We should go together, right? : )
    If you want, please send me email. I will contact you when I visit Toronto later.

  80. DEBORAH
    Posted November 12th, 2008 at 10:06 pm | # |

    The name of the restaurant in Toronto is called Joong-Soo-Nae. The phone number is 416.222.4267. It is a very modest place but the food is really good, Korean (Jeolla) “jip umshik”. The owners are a wonderful couple from Jeolla-nam do and the owner’s wife makes all the panchan (she is originally from Gwangju). I am a very loyal customer and am lucky because I work very close to their restaurant but I have been going there for years even before working close to the restaurant. They are known for their incredible chigaes and also Kimchi Jeyuk Bokkum. Oh my God my mouth is watering just thinking about the food. All the traditional Adjumonis and Ajossis go there when they are homesick, eat, reminisce about Korea and enjoy themselves. Best regards, Deborah

  81. Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
    Posted November 12th, 2008 at 10:06 am | # |

    Sahar,
    Did you make it? How did it turn out?

    DEBORAH,
    Let me know which restaurant in Toronto serves Cholla province food.
    I have been to Chagalchi fish market in Busan, too. It’s awesome! One thing I miss about Korea is very fresh “hoe”(sashimi). : )
    Thank you very much for your compliment.

  82. DEBORAH
    Posted November 11th, 2008 at 8:40 pm | # |

    The Hwae Dup Bap looks wonderful. It is one of my all-time favourite Korean meals. I remember Pusan, Chagalchi Sichang- the freshest fish and seafood imaginable …

    You are a very talented person – great personality too – have you ever thought about doing a television show? People are very health-conscious now (which Korean food is) and its a unique cuisine. Seriously, think about it! If you ever visit Toronto, I can give you the name of a restaurant which serves traditional Jeolla umshik. Their panchan is exquisite – Maangchi, tae dan hi kamsah hamnidah for this incredible website.

  83. Sahar
    Posted November 11th, 2008 at 9:52 am | # |

    I’m going to try to make this today! 호박죽 진짜 진짜 좋아해요 ^__^

  84. Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
    Posted November 10th, 2008 at 8:25 pm | # |

    Anita,
    Thank you for your update! It sounds like you are busy cooking Korean food these days. : )

  85. Anita
    Posted November 10th, 2008 at 4:28 pm | # |

    Made this with cold cucumber salad and potatoes this weekend. I didn’t realize beforehand how much work the rice balls would be – I only got half the dough done before I got too hungry! (So I have dough in my freezer.) I skipped the sugar, and it was very very good – but I used most of the small bag of sweet rice flour! So now I have a good excuse to go back to the korean grocery and get more stuff.

  86. Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
    Posted November 9th, 2008 at 9:30 pm | # |
  87. DEBORAH
    Posted November 9th, 2008 at 8:07 pm | # |

    Hi again, have not made your doenjangjigae yet … shall do next weekend. I like a thick broth that has substance. So comforting on a cold night when one gets in from work. I look forward to trying yours. Also … is there a recipe for Hwae Dup Bap on your site? I think a lot of people would like that – especially made with minari (watercress). A great calorie-conscious dish (most Korean food is not fattening) and healthy as well – vegetables, fish. If you do share a good Hwae Dup Bap recipe for us, if you could include the sauce – the “gochujang” that goes with the hwae dup bap. Regards, Deborah

  88. Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
    Posted November 9th, 2008 at 5:21 pm | # |

    DEBORAH
    You seem to like cooking a lot! I think my doenjangjjigae is very thick. You tasted more concentrated version of doenjangjjigae at a Korean restaurant? Interesting!
    Thank you for your interest in my recipes anyway.

  89. DEBORAH
    Posted November 9th, 2008 at 3:12 pm | # |

    Gomapsumnidah! I have an additional question – there is another version of Den Jang Chigae, sort of a richer, more concentrated version. Do you know what it is? There are some wonderful, very traditional (Korean) restaurants here in Toronto. You would be amazed. Please, Maangchi, keep giving us these wonderful recipes. My ‘fridge at home consists mostly of “Hanguk umshik” – what’s not to love. I watched your preparation of Oi Sobaegi on UTube. You make it look so easy!

  90. Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
    Posted November 8th, 2008 at 10:25 pm | # |

    Deboarah your Korean is good!

  91. DEBORAH
    Posted November 8th, 2008 at 9:18 pm | # |

    Tae dan hi kamsah hamnidah. Yoggi umshik mashisayo (mayoo yummy yummy). I miss Korea so much …

  92. Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
    Posted November 4th, 2008 at 8:14 am | # |

    Ji hoon,
    Thanks for your encouragement!

  93. 김지훈
    Posted November 4th, 2008 at 5:38 am | # |

    팟캐스트로 다운받았는데요^^
    너무 유용하게 보고있습니다^^
    정말 같은 한국인으로서 자부심을 느낍니다^^
    앞으로도 더 많은 요리자료 올려주세요^^

  94. Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
    Posted November 1st, 2008 at 10:24 am | # |

    Chris,
    of course I remember you!
    Yeah, I agree! There should be lots of food booths in any festivals! Food is very important for me to enjoy the festival. : )

  95. Chris
    Posted November 1st, 2008 at 7:27 am | # |

    Hi Maangchi!

    Still remember me from Singapore? Happy Halloween! Long time no see!

    For me, it’s 1 Nov. I went to the Korea Festival. It was quite disappointing as there was not many food booths and live cooking demostrations. It was quite a small scale one. Maybe my expectations was a tad too high. Still enjoyed myself!

    Ciao for now! Enjoy your trick-or-treating! Bye!

  96. Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
    Posted October 31st, 2008 at 7:57 am | # |

    ginger,
    no, you need sweet rice powder to make hobakjuk. Sweet rice is sticky glutinous rice.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tapioca

  97. ginger
    Posted October 31st, 2008 at 1:41 am | # |

    hey maangchi~
    is the dough thing…kind of like sweet tapioca?

  98. Sylvia My profile page I'm a fan! joined 9/08
    Posted October 27th, 2008 at 5:51 pm | # |

    I made this today, yummy.

  99. Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
    Posted October 26th, 2008 at 11:59 pm | # |

    Lillian,
    “roasted flavor was actually nice”, I agree with you. : )

  100. Lillian
    Posted October 26th, 2008 at 8:51 pm | # |

    Hi Maangchi,

    I just made this and it was so good, especially on this cold and windy night. My squash scorched a little bit when I was steaming it (ran out of water), but I made the soup anyway and the roasted flavor was actually nice. I made a small amount: only 1/2 a kabocha squash and 1/2 c. mochiko. It was perfect for just one person (my BF doesn’t like squash :P). Thanks for the recipe–I will definitely make it again!

  101. Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
    Posted October 25th, 2008 at 8:12 pm | # |

    mei,
    oh, I see!
    Thank you!

  102. mei
    Posted October 25th, 2008 at 4:53 pm | # |

    maangchii
    actually my oven-butternut squash fries follows recipes i browsed randomly from internet =D i dont have any exact recipe/measurement but usally i simply slice it thinly and coat it with egg (or egg whites to reduce calories) then coat it with bread crumbs and bake it till crisp.. ^^

  103. Myla
    Posted October 24th, 2008 at 10:29 am | # |

    Hi,,,you know your so great i envy u a lot…
    Thats why i always follow your recipe,i wish i could learn them all…Because Iam Pilipina and my husband is korean he dont like some of philippine food,,,
    and i always cook only fried egg and kimchi chigae…
    for about one year…but then one day i found your site…after i watch i first try your dubukki…
    My husband said that it was great.
    So i will try all of your recipe i wish i can make same as yours…More power to you…
    And thank you very much,you made our relationship more strong b’cuz of your delicious recipes…
    Thanks again…

  104. Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
    Posted October 24th, 2008 at 8:11 am | # |

    Nellie,
    Sweet pumpkin rice porridge? It sounds unfamiliar to me! : ) But why don’t you try?
    I sometimes use rice in red bean porridge (patjuk) and mung bean porridge (nokdujuk), but never use rice in pumpkin porridge.

  105. Nellie
    Posted October 24th, 2008 at 7:50 am | # |

    Maangchi,

    I currently live in S. Korea and I found sweet pumpkin rice porridge for sale in the grocery store. It’s like a cross between your recipe and rice porridge. Can I make your recipe and add some rice to it for the same flavor? Or, is it a different type of juk?

    Thank you for the wonderful post. I will try making hobak juk this weekend.

  106. Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
    Posted October 22nd, 2008 at 10:03 pm | # |

    mei,
    When you have free time, please let us know the recipe for your oven fried chips using butternut squash on the forum here at http://www.maangchi.com/talk/forum/general-discussion

    Interesting!

  107. mei
    Posted October 22nd, 2008 at 9:40 pm | # |

    thank you maangchi! =]
    yes, i usually bake it too, sometimes puree it for soup, or cut to thin slices (as an oven-fried chips)..its soo good =D will try this next time ^^

  108. Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
    Posted October 22nd, 2008 at 8:15 pm | # |

    mei,
    yes, it’ll be ok to make rice cake balls in advance.
    Don’t forget to cook them fully until they are floating.

    I love butternut squash, too. Sometimes I bake it in the oven. When it’s cooked, I put some honey, cinnamon powder, and a little bit of butter and scoop it to eat. It’s another way of eating butternut squash.

  109. mei
    Posted October 22nd, 2008 at 7:51 pm | # |

    hi maangchi,
    is it ok to make the balls ahead of time and store it in the fridge overnight?
    thanks for the recipe =)) i love butternut squash!

  110. Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
    Posted October 19th, 2008 at 4:17 pm | # |

    mattlai,
    I’m happy to hear about your success in making hobakjuk! Congratulation!

  111. mattlai
    Posted October 19th, 2008 at 1:44 pm | # |

    OHH Maangchi… I made this a wonderful desert-like soup by adding 1/4cup more sugar and 2-3 TBS of cinnamon! It was goood!!!! Thanks for the hobakjuk recipe!

  112. Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
    Posted October 17th, 2008 at 7:37 am | # |

    Sylvia,
    yes, cooking is fun for me especially when I’m hungry. : )

    VB,
    Look at the very top of the recipe to see what kind of category this dish belongs to.

    It could be used as main meal, appetizer, or snack.
    When it’s warm, it’s more delicious.

  113. VB
    Posted October 17th, 2008 at 1:02 am | # |

    This dish is very interesting! May I know if this is considered a dessert if eaten cold and a porridge if eaten warm/hot (as in as a meal) or is it part of a meal?

    ps. Looks like u are all set for Halloween!

  114. Sylvia My profile page I'm a fan! joined 9/08
    Posted October 16th, 2008 at 4:30 pm | # |

    Happy Halloween!!
    You are so cute in the wig, and you always look like you are having fun cooking. I think I will make this on a snow day when all the kids are stuck home (they will help). Cooked squash freezes well so I’ll freeze some now while they are plentiful at the produce market.

  115. Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
    Posted October 16th, 2008 at 6:45 am | # |

    Andree-Anne,
    Thank you for updating your successful hobakjuk making!

  116. Andree-Anne
    Posted October 15th, 2008 at 7:54 pm | # |

    Hiii!!
    I’ve made your receipe tonight and it taste really good! I’ve added some of the chinese 5 spicies on it! I’ll do this receipe again for sure!
    Thanks a lot!

  117. Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
    Posted October 15th, 2008 at 6:31 pm | # |

    nazarene,
    I’m very glad to hear that my recipes may help you save money. Eating good food is very important. Don’t get too hungry. : )

  118. nazarene
    Posted October 15th, 2008 at 2:56 pm | # |

    I’m really interested in Korean culture and when I watch Korean shows, they make the food look so good!!

    But since I’m a starving vegan student, I don’t really have the money to buy vegetarian ingredients or the special ingredients like gochujang.

    But with your recipes, making korean food is easy for me now!

    Thanks, these were a great help!!!

    Now, I can eat hobakjook whenever I want to!!

  119. Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
    Posted October 15th, 2008 at 6:35 am | # |

    Ann,
    Is joraengiddeok (조랭이떡) made with plain rice flour?
    If so, I would not recommend using it.
    Please make the rice cake balls made with sweet rice flour. : ) And make it when you eat it and serve hot.
    I never make hobakjuk in advance.

    leftover porridge will be kept in the fridge for next day. You can eat it either cold or hot. Cold hobakjuk will thicken. I usually put some water in the thicken porridge and heat it again. Don’t forget to stir it on an off.
    The density of porridge is controlled by the amount of extra water you put.

  120. Ann
    Posted October 15th, 2008 at 1:20 am | # |

    Thanks for the recipe Maangchi.Here in Korea I bought 조랭이 떡 so I don’t need to make the rice cake balls.I plan to make hobakjuk today and my family will eat it tomorrow,so can I just put the rice cake balls in now and keep in refrigerator?or make the porridge for now,keep in refrigerator and tomorrow when we eat,heat it up and add the rice cake balls in?Is the hobakjuk supposed to be served hot or cold?If the rice cake balls are only added before serving,can I put 조랭이 떡 in freezer because I’m afraid they will be dried if I put them in room temp.for a day (or maybe two)

  121. Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
    Posted October 14th, 2008 at 6:09 pm | # |

    Lu,
    1.Yeah, I used 3/4 cup of hot water plus maybe 1-2 tbs more later for 2 cups of sweet rice flour. Prepare 1 cup of hot water for 2 cups of rice flour, then control the moisture. The amount of hot water depends on how dry the flour is. It should feel like an earlobe. : )
    If it’s too dry, you will have to add a little more hot water.

    2.Yes, the rice cake balls are used in red bean porridge (팥죽: potjuk). But as you see in the video, the rice cake balls for hobakjuk is very small.

    I’m going to post the recipe forred bean porridge later.

  122. Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
    Posted October 14th, 2008 at 5:56 pm | # |

    Anna,
    Did you leave your question on Forum? I was going to find a Korean grocery in Uruguay through searching Korean website, but can’t find any.

  123. Alyssa
    Posted October 14th, 2008 at 4:22 pm | # |

    Hi maangchi! I was wondering is this rice cake recipe can also be used to make the dukbokki rice cake?

  124. Lu
    Posted October 14th, 2008 at 12:51 pm | # |

    Hi, Maangchi! Great recipe and video. You look so cute in your wig, and your captions are so funny. (“Me! Me! Maangchi!”) I have two questions about the rice balls. (1) When you first mixed in the water, it looked so dry! I have this problem with all kinds of dough, so I want to ask you if you added any more water as you were mixing the rice flour balls. Or does the dough keep getting moister as you knead it? (2) are these the same kind of rice balls that are used in the red bean porridge (which I think is eaten during the winter holidays?)?

    Thank you for posting all these recipes and stories.

    Lu

  125. Anna
    Posted October 14th, 2008 at 8:05 am | # |

    Thanks for the reply,Maangchi. I live in Uruguay, and I can’t find “arroz pegajoso”(sticky rice)in the grocery,
    much more the “harina de arroz pegajosa”(sticky rice flour). There aren’t much asians around here, and I’ve never been to the only one “asian store” here, but I’m sure in Argentina they have asian stores that carry “exotic” products..and I’ve heard of a Korean community in Flores…when I go to Argentina I’ll surely visit it. Again, thanks for the reply..

  126. Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
    Posted October 14th, 2008 at 6:32 am | # |

    Anna,
    I never use plain flour to make rice cake balls.
    I hope you can find right ingredient. Where do you live?
    Check the forum under “Where do you buy Korean ingredients?”. If you don’t find any information that you are looking for, leave your question there. Someone who knows where you can get glutinous rice flour in your area may give you good answer.

  127. Maangchi New York City My profile page joined 8/08
    Posted October 14th, 2008 at 6:27 am | # |

    Josh,
    how are you! How do you like living in Korea? : )
    Made heukimjajuk (black sesame porridge)? I’m impressed!
    Anyway, I recommend getting danhobak (“단호박” in Korean) to make hobakjuk.

    http://www.chosun.com/se/news/200410/200410280168.html

    http://www.wildplant.kr/comzy/bbs/board.php?bo_table=w_horti&sfl=wr_subject%7C%7Cwr_content&stx=%B7%B9%BA%A3&wr_id=116036

    You can make hobakjuk either the first one or the second one.

    Let me know how your hobakjuk turns out!

  128. Anna
    Posted October 14th, 2008 at 6:04 am | # |

    love your costume!!!! you look so pretty =) It’s market day today, so I’m going to include a butter squash and make this :)By the way, I can’t find glutinous/sweet rice flour here, and you mentioned before in a comment for the sweet rice flour that you can substitute flour for it, is this correct? Would plain rice flour be ok for this? Thanks!

  129. Josh
    Posted October 13th, 2008 at 10:07 pm | # |

    Looks good! If I am making this in Korea, do I use the small green Korean pumpkins or the big bumpy orange ones?

    I made heugimja juk the other day. It’s good! You should do more juk recipes. :)

  130. Nathan
    Posted October 13th, 2008 at 9:49 pm | # |

    That looks really good, I love winter squashes and use them often in stews, or steamed with sauces over them or even boiled in unrefined cane sugar syrup infused with cinnamon.

    I will make your recipe soon, I was laughing at the “big rice balls in that dish is lazy peoples way of doing it” I though of something more lazy… someone using “canned pumpkin puree” and already frozen rice balls ha ha.

    P.S. Nice wig, it reminded me of cosplay I see at anime expos :D


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