Bibimbap

비빔밥
Rice mixed with vegetables, meat, an egg, and chili pepper paste

Today’s recipe is bibimbap, a super-popular Korean dish you might have heard about already! It’s made of a bowl of rice, sautéed and seasoned vegetables (namul: 나물), a bit of hot pepper paste (gochujang: 고추장), and usually a bit of seasoned raw beef, too (yukhoe: 육회).

Bibim (비빔) translates as “mixed,” and bap (밥) means “cooked rice,” so bibimbap literally means “mixed rice.” Before eating it you’re supposed to mix everything all together.

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There are many variations on this dish, from simple to elaborate, and this recipe I’m showing you today is for one you could consider “classic” bibimbap. If you ordered bibimbap in a Korean restaurant, you would probably get something like this dish, with regional variations. I’m also going to show you bibimbap prepared and served in a heated stone or earthenware bowl called dolsot-bibimbap (돌솥비빔밥). “Dolsot” means “stone pot” in Korean, and this version is well-known for the way the bowl makes a layer of crispy, crackling rice on the bottom of the bibimbap.

Even though we mix up bibimbap before we eat it, each ingredient needs to be prepared with care and individuality, bringing out their unique flavors, textures and colors so they come together beautifully in the bowl and deliciously in your mouth. The different ingredients aren’t random, they’re chosen because they balance, harmonize, and offset each other.

This recipe isn’t quick and easy, it takes some time to make. But if you’re really in a rush you can make a great bibimbap with the soybean sprouts, spinach, and carrot (or red bell pepper, or both), and gochujang, sesame oil, and an egg— those items are unskippable!

I’m going to share some more bibimbap recipes on my website in the future, and you’ll see how many different variations there are. This version is a little different than the version in my cookbook, because I make a quick and simple soup with the bean sprouts. When I started my YouTube channel, bibimbap was one of the first recipes I made, because it’s such an essential dish in Korean cuisine. So I’m happy to remake the video now in HD with much better editing and instruction. I’ve been building up to this video by remaking videos for the ingredients, too. I remade yukhoe, and sigeumchi-namul, and my yukagaejang video has a lot of detail about preparing the mountain vegetable fernbrake.

So if you’ve been following my videos, you’re now ready to be a bibimbap master! Ready? Let’s start!

Ingredients (serves 4)

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How to prepare dried fernbrake (gosari) for use

If you have presoaked or fresh fernbrake you can use it straight away, but if you have dried fernbrake you’ll need to get it ready to eat. It’s fast if you have a pressure cooker, but if you don’t it will take some time.

With a pressure cooker:

  1. Wash ½ ounce of dried gosari and boil it with 5 cups of water in a pressure cooker for 30 minutes.
  2. Drain and rinse in cold water a couple of times.
  3. Drain. It should make 4 ounces.

In a pot on the stove:

  1. In a large saucepan add ½ ounce of dried gosari to 7 cups of water. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat and boil for 30 minutes. Cover and let stand until cool, about 2 to 3 hours.
  2. Rinse the fernbrake a couple of times, drain and put in a bowl. Cover with fresh cold water and let soak for at least 8 hours or overnight in a cool place, changing the water 2 or 3 times during the soaking.gosari
  3. Taste the gosari: It should be soft. If it’s tough, boil it again in a fresh pot of water for about 20 minutes and then let it sit, covered, until soft.
  4. Drain. It should make 4 ounces.

Make rice

If you have a usual method for making rice or have a rice cooker, go ahead and make 5 cups of rice like you usually do. But here’s how I do it on a pot on the stove. 2 cups of dried rice makes about 5 cups of cooked rice.

  1. Rinse 2 cups of rice in cold water and scrub the wet rice with your hand. Rinse and drain until the drained water is pretty clear.
  2. Put the rice in a heavy-bottomed pot. Add 2 cups of water, cover, and soak for 30 minutes.
  3. Cook over medium high heat for 7 to 8 minutes until the surface is covered with abundant bubbles that are spluttering noisily and look like they’re about to overflow the pot. Turn the rice over a few times with a spoon and cover the pot again.
  4. Turn the heat to very low and simmer for another 10 minutes until the rice is fully cooked and fluffy. Remove from the heat.
  5. Fluff the rice with a spoon to release excess steam. Let the rice stand, covered, at room temperature to keep it warm.

Prepare and cook the ingredients for bibimbap

I like to get a big platter and then put each vegetable on it as they’re ready. I think it looks really pretty, but you don’t have to do this. When all vegetables are prepared and ready to use, the platter looks pretty delicious!

Soybean sprouts:

  1. Put the soy bean sprouts in a pot and add 4 cups water and 2 or 3 teaspoons salt. Cover and cook for 20 minutes over medium high heat. Take out the sprouts with tongs and put them into a bowl, leaving about ½ cup of sprouts in the pot with the water you used to boil them. This is the soup to serve with bibimbap later.bibimbap kongnamul
  2. In a bowl, mix the sprouts by hand with ½ teaspoons salt, 1 teaspoon minced garlic, and 2 teaspoons sesame oil. Put them on the large platter.

Spinach:

  1. Cut up the blanched spinach a few times and put it in a bowl. Mix by hand with 1 teaspoon garlic, 1 teaspoon sesame oil, ½ teaspoon salt, and 1 teaspoon sesame seeds. Cover and put it next to the soy bean sprouts on the platter.

Other fresh vegetables:

  1. Cut the carrot into matchsticks, put them in a bowl, and mix with a pinch of salt. Let stand for 5 to 10 minutes until sweating.bibimbap carrot
  2. Cut the red bell pepper into halves, deseed, and slice into strips. Put them in a bowl.
  3. Cut the zucchini into matchsticks and mix with ½ teaspoon salt.
  4. Cut the cucumber into halves lengthwise and slice thinly crosswise. Mix with ¼ teaspoon salt.

Beef:

  1. Cut the beef into matchsticks and put them in a bowl.
  2. Mix with 1 tablespoon minced garlic, 1 tablespoon soy sauce, 1 tablespoon honey, 2 teaspoons sesame oil, and 1 teaspoon sesame seeds with a spoon.bibimbap yukhoe
  3. Cover and keep in the fridge until ready to use.

Mountain vegetables:

  1. Cut the fernbrake (gosari) a few times into bite size pieces. Set aside.
  2. Put the bellflower roots (doraji) in a large bowl. Add 1 or 2 tablespoons salt. Rub for a minute to wilt slightly and release some of the bitterness. Rinse them in cold water a couple of times and drain. If you find some roots are too thick, split them lengthwise. Set aside.

Let’s cook!

  1. Heat up a pan over medium high heat. Squeeze out excess water from the carrot. Add a few drops of cooking oil to the pan and sauté the carrot for 1 minute. Put it on the platter next to the soy bean sprouts and spinach. Clean the pan with wet paper towel or wash it.
  2. Heat a few drops of cooking oil in the pan and squeeze out the excess water from the cucumber. Sauté with ½ teaspoon minced garlic and a few drops of sesame oil for 30 seconds. Put it on the platter. Clean the pan.
  3. Heat up the pan with a few drops of cooking oil. Add the red bell pepper and sprinkle a pinch of salt over top. Sauté for 30 seconds. Put it on the platter. Clean the pan.
  4. Heat up the pan and squeeze out excess water from the zucchini. Add a few drops of cooking oil and sauté with 1 teaspoon minced garlic, 1 tablespoon chopped green onion, a drop of sesame oil for 1 minute until slightly softened. Put it on the platter. Clean the pan.
  5. Heat up the pan with a few drops of cooking oil. Add the bellflower roots and sauté for 2 to 3 minutes. Lower the heat to medium so as not to brown them. Add 1 teaspoon minced garlic and a drop of sesame oil. Stir for another minute until a little softened. Put it on the platter. Clean the pan.bellflower root (doraji)
  6. Heat up the pan. Add a few drops of cooking oil. Stir the gosari for 2 minutes until a little softened. Add ½  teaspoon of minced garlic, 2 teaspoons soy sauce, and 2 teaspoons sugar, and keep stirring for another minute. Put it on the platter.

bibimbap vegetables

Serve

Here are a couple of ways to serve: bibimbap in a regular, shallow bowl, and dolsot-bibimbap in a stone or earthenware bowl.

In a regular, shallow bowl

  1. Reheat the soybean sprout soup.soup
  2. Divide the cooked rice into 4 portions. Each portion will be a little more than 1 cup of rice.
  3. Put the rice in each of 4 bowls and arrange the vegetables and beef on the rice. Top with the egg yolk and gochujang. If you prefer your eggs and beef cooked, make sunny side up eggs and slightly pan-fry the beef before putting them on the top of rice.
  4. Sprinkle the bibimbap with the sesame seeds and drizzle with sesame oil to taste.
  5. Ladle the soup to a small bowl and sprinkle some chopped green onion over top.
  6. Serve right away with more hot pepper paste on the side.bibimbap

Dolsot-bibimbap in an earthenware bowl (ttukbaegi) or stone pot (dolsot)

  1. Reheat the soybean sprout soup.
  2. Put a few drops of sesame oil in the bottom of each of 4 earthenware bowls. They should be big enough to hold 4 to 6 cups each.
  3. Divide the rice among the bowls. Arrange the vegetables and beef on the rice. Top each serving with an egg yolk and 1 tablespoon gochujang. If you prefer your eggs and beef cooked, make sunny side up eggs and slightly pan-fry the beef before putting them on the top of rice.
  4. Set each pot on a burner. Heat over medium high heat until you hear a ticking, crackling sound coming from the rice.dolsot-bibimbap
  5. Sprinkle the bibimbap with the sesame seeds, drizzle with sesame oil to taste.
  6. Ladle the soup to a small bowl and sprinkle some chopped green onion over top.
  7. Serve right away with more hot pepper paste on the side.gochujang

Eat

  1. Gently but firmly mix everything together in the bowl with your spoon. Try not to crush the more delicate ingredients.bibimbap mixing
  2. Eat with your spoon.

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370 Comments:

  1. MinJiAegyo Arizona joined 8/10
    Posted August 6th, 2010 at 12:40 pm | # |

    I made BiBimBap! Everything turned out right except Kosari ]= I don’t understand I boiled it for a long time and soaked it over night but it didn’t softened ]= Did I do something wrong?

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    • Maangchi New York City joined 8/08
      Posted August 8th, 2010 at 6:17 am | # |

      “..soaked it over night but it didn’t softened”
      Are you sure your kosari is real kosari? : )
      https://www.maangchi.com/ingredients/kosari

      Dried kosari
      1. Place kosari in cold water in a pot. 1 cup of kosari will need
      more than 20 cups of water.
      2. Boil it for 30 minutes and don’t drain hot water and let it soak. Wait about 6-8 hours.
      I usually boil it at night and drain it next morning.

      If your kosari is still tough even though you follow the method the above, soak it longer until soft.

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  2. reesejin corona joined 4/10
    Posted August 4th, 2010 at 12:39 pm | # |

    I made this yesterday and it was delicious! Thanks Maangchi!

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    • Maangchi New York City joined 8/08
      Posted August 4th, 2010 at 2:24 pm | # |

      Thank you for the update! Have a great day!

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  3. 9pm_superlove joined 7/10
    Posted August 3rd, 2010 at 8:08 am | # |

    i tried this yesterday, and it’s jjang!! thx for the great recipe

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    • Maangchi New York City joined 8/08
      Posted August 3rd, 2010 at 2:11 pm | # |

      you are Jjang! haha! Congratulations!

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  4. phoebs Dunedin, New Zealand joined 7/10
    Posted July 13th, 2010 at 4:07 am | # |

    hey maangchi! could you help me out please.. how do you cook rice without a rice cooker? i want to cook rice but i don’t have one..

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    • Maangchi New York City joined 8/08
      Posted July 13th, 2010 at 4:28 pm | # |

      How to make rice using a pot
      1.Put 2 cups of rice in a thick bottomed pot and wash and rinse a few times.Drain water. No need to dry it. It will look wetty.
      2.Add 2.5 cups of water and soak it for about 30 minutes.
      3.Put the pot on the stove and bring to a boil over high heat for about 10 minutes.
      4.Once it starts boiling (or boils over), stir it with a spoon and lower the heat to simmer for another 10 minutes.
      That’s it!

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  5. ximachikenx joined 7/10
    Posted July 12th, 2010 at 11:05 pm | # |

    I have made this recipe a few times already (without the kosari because I can’t find it near where I live) and every time it has been delicious :) Will never use another recipe for bibimbap!

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  6. docpark US joined 5/10
    Posted July 11th, 2010 at 10:51 pm | # |

    Great recipe Maangch! You are an indispensable resource to the Korean American. These dishes feed the heart as well as the stomach. Linked is my blog entry about your bibimbap.

    http://golfism.org/2010/07/11/bibimbap-risotto-coreano/

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    • Maangchi New York City joined 8/08
      Posted July 12th, 2010 at 11:44 am | # |

      You made fantastic looking bibimbap. yummy! Thank you for sharing the photo and your blog with me and my other readers!

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  7. dora3mon93 Indonesia joined 7/10
    Posted July 1st, 2010 at 12:41 am | # |

    are there another sauce for changing the hot pepper paste. Because I’m difficult to find it in my town. But I also want the spicy one.
    If the Yangnyeomjang sauce, that isn’t the spicy one right??

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    • Maangchi New York City joined 8/08
      Posted July 1st, 2010 at 4:38 pm | # |

      yes, yangnyeomjang sauce will be good. Add hot pepper flakes to the sauce if you like spicy food.

      It says, “Chop 4 green onions and put them in a small bowl. Pour half cup of soy sauce in there, and add 1 tbs of sesame seeds, 2 ts of sugar, 1 tbs of sesame oil and mix it up.

      Add 1/4 cup hot pepper flakes to the sauce, then the sauce will be spicy.

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  8. yorkshine Brisbane joined 6/10
    Posted June 27th, 2010 at 11:54 pm | # |

    hello maangchi, I just make my first bibimbap with your recipe and it turned out successfully! Yay~ we can eat as much as we want and dont have to buy one $15 from outside anymore! So happy! Thank u ^^

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  9. elainec joined 6/10
    Posted June 15th, 2010 at 4:11 pm | # |

    can i replace kosari? will it affect the taste?

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    • Maangchi New York City joined 8/08
      Posted June 15th, 2010 at 9:59 pm | # |

      You can skip kosari. It will still be delicious!

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  10. curiouscat Shanghai, China joined 5/10
    Posted May 24th, 2010 at 10:36 am | # |

    hi! I’ve recently discovered your site and decided yesterday to try this recipe. Cooked it today (minus the kosari) and must say I loved it! Thank you so much! It was soooo delicious that I had it for lunch and dinner hihihi. Thanks again! I’ll be sure to try other recipes too!

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    • Maangchi New York City joined 8/08
      Posted May 24th, 2010 at 11:12 am | # |

      yay, good news! hihihi! : )

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  11. negar joined 5/10
    Posted May 18th, 2010 at 3:29 am | # |

    Hi maangchi!!!
    I,m so happy!!!yesterday I went out ond I found a super market that it has all kinds of korean sause!!!ohhh now I can make korean food!!

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    • Maangchi New York City joined 8/08
      Posted May 18th, 2010 at 9:02 am | # |

      oh, yeah! omg, I’m very happy for you! I know how you feel.

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  12. joshuahernandez USA joined 5/10
    Posted May 18th, 2010 at 1:08 am | # |

    I’ve tried this dish. It’s quite good.

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  13. beckytoh Malaysia joined 4/10
    Posted April 29th, 2010 at 10:38 am | # |

    hi maangchi!

    i notice that in korean dramas, they usually show people having quick mixed rice with lots of gochujang. Is there a quicker way to make bibimbap or is that another recipe altogether?
    i was thinking that we get the banchan leftovers from the fridge and mix them with rice and lots of gochujang. Need your advice, thank you!

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    • Maangchi New York City joined 8/08
      Posted April 29th, 2010 at 10:57 am | # |

      That’s right! : ) Heat your pot on the stove, and add all your leftover vegetables from the fridge. Stir until warm, then add rice and hot pepper paste. Keep stirring (mixing) with the spoon. Turn the heat off and add sesame oil!

      I sometimes make this bibimbap with only kimchi and hot pepper paste. You don’t need anything else. oh, sesame oil! : )
      Chop up some kimchi (fermented kimchi) and place it in a heated pan on the stove. Add some kimchi juice and hot pepper paste, and rice! Keep stirring until the bibimbap is sizzling! Drizzle some sesame oil.

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  14. TrickyTree Seoul joined 4/10
    Posted April 23rd, 2010 at 8:54 am | # |

    Hi Maangchi

    I have adpated Bibimbap and created a dish called ZenBibimbap!

    Instead of using high G.I white sticky rice, I use low G.I brown rice with added red beans. I change the ground beef for mild tuna in spring water. I use all the same ‘yachae’ veggies as in the traditional recipe. However some people add sugar to the red pepper paste sauce, but I use fresh homemade ‘Maesil’ (plum juice) from my Korean mother-in-law. I also add some crushed walnuts and use a soft poached egg instead of fried. And sprinkle sesame seeds and some dried kim (lava) to finish and a drizzle of sesame oil. I’m a marathon runner and this is just the best meal I can ever eat for a healthy and energetic lifestyle. Plus, it tastes delicious!

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  15. campinoy cambodia joined 4/10
    Posted April 16th, 2010 at 10:25 pm | # |

    hi maangchi,

    what can i use as substitute for kosari? im tired going around korean stores here in cambodia and i just really want to eat bibimpap in our mission base but i just can’t find kosari….also im having problems in doing a chili paste that just taste like the korean kochujang….i hope you can help me make our own chili paste since our mission base is too far from the city of Phnom Penh where I could acccess to korean stores…thanks a lot!

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  16. tuArai joined 4/10
    Posted April 14th, 2010 at 7:40 pm | # |

    Thank you for the clip.
    This is one of my favorite dish that I get from Korean food court ^_^

    I usually get the vegetable only bibimbap since I don’t eat beef.
    Would using pork or chicken would be a good substitution?

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    • Maangchi New York City joined 8/08
      Posted April 14th, 2010 at 8:26 pm | # |

      yes, you could replace beef with pork or chicken. If you like seafood, you could add shrimp to your bibimbap. Anyway vegetarian version of bibimbap is also delicious.

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  17. Just-Me-506 New York joined 3/10
    Posted March 30th, 2010 at 4:10 pm | # |

    Would there be a different taste if u don’t add the ground meat because i am planning on making this for a friend that’s vegetarian? And thanks for the recipes.

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    • Maangchi New York City joined 8/08
      Posted March 30th, 2010 at 7:34 pm | # |

      no, vegetarian version bibimbap without meat is delicious. Don’t worry. Use more mushrooms. Good luck with making delicious bibimbap!

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  18. choppy joined 3/10
    Posted March 30th, 2010 at 12:31 am | # |

    hi. i have a question. would it effect the taste if i dont use the kosari? because im not korean and i dont know where to find the kosari in my country….

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    • Maangchi New York City joined 8/08
      Posted March 30th, 2010 at 12:34 am | # |

      No, your bibimbap will still be delicious even though you don’t use kosari.

      (0)
  19. tilapiacooker Los Angeles joined 3/10
    Posted March 4th, 2010 at 2:52 am | # |

    hi maangchi!

    I recently purchased a package of “dried bracken,” which looks like the kosari, but with dried flowers on the ends of it. The lady at the market told me they were the same things, and that the flowers were edible. For the purposes of making bibimbap, should I use this “flowered” bracken, or should I stick with the deflowered kosari? Also, I had been trying to figure out how to prepare the kosari. Should I soak it first before boiling, or should I boil it before soaking? Your guidance would be much appreciated. =)

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    • Maangchi New York City joined 8/08
      Posted March 4th, 2010 at 8:48 am | # |

      yes, you can use flowered kosari,too.
      Place kosari in cold water in a pot. 1 cup of kosari will need more than 20 cups of water.
      Boil it for 30 minutes and don’t drain hot water and let it soak for at least 8 hours.
      Rinse the soaked kosari a couple of times in cold water before using.
      I usually boil it at night for next day use.

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      • tilapiacooker Los Angeles joined 3/10
        Posted March 4th, 2010 at 9:03 pm | # |

        great! thank you! looking forward to your next l.a. meet! =)

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  20. sirdanilot Terneuzen, The Netherlands joined 10/09
    Posted March 1st, 2010 at 1:49 pm | # |

    hey maangchi I made something that uh… looked like bibimbap (at least!) and it was very delicious, so I’m going to make it properly next time.

    I used only what I had in the house which were leeks, soybean sprouts and tofu… the only thing I didn’t like was the tofu so I’m going to follow your recipe and add real meat next time. so uh vegetarians, try to find something other than tofu to put in your bibimbap. I myself am only semi-vegetarian (mostly veggies, sometimes fish/seafood/meat) so I don’t need to.

    Question: do you know a good way to make this dish with already cooked cold rice? my cooked rice was really lumpy so I put it in with the vegs but I got some lumps of rice. Also, is there a way to ‘dilute’ the gochujang, since I find it a bit spicy (could I add it to the non spicy sauce you posted? could I add some water?)

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    • Maangchi New York City joined 8/08
      Posted March 1st, 2010 at 2:08 pm | # |

      These are my answers.

      “do you know a good way to make this dish with already cooked cold rice?”
      1. Heat up your pot.
      2. Put all your vegetable ingredients into the pot and stir them with a spoon until hot,
      3. Add your cold rice. (Cold rice is lumpy and firm, so you can add some water to break it more easily)
      4. Add hot pepper paste and keep stirring your bibimbap.
      5. Turn off the heat and add sesame oil. That’s it!

      ” is there a way to ‘dilute’ the gochujang, since I find it a bit spicy”
      Add more rice and vegetables.

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  21. Sheryl Philippines joined 2/10
    Posted February 8th, 2010 at 10:54 pm | # |

    I tried super simple bibimbap last night. I’m really curious about the taste, and since I recently bought gochujang (hot pepper paste) and sesame oil, I decided to put them on my rice without having vegetables.

    One word I can say – the simple bibimbap I tried was really delicious. It was slight sweet and spicy. <33 Next thing will I do is making it with veggies. Can't wait!

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    • Maangchi New York City joined 8/08
      Posted March 1st, 2010 at 2:09 pm | # |

      yes, I love simple bibimbap, too.

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  22. Sheryl Philippines joined 2/10
    Posted February 4th, 2010 at 11:26 pm | # |

    AAAAHHHH!!~
    Mouth wateringgg food!
    Thanks unnie for sharing this. I wanna try this someday but I don’t know where to find fern brakes (kosari). I’m not really sure if it’s available here in Philippines supermarket. If ever it’s not available, is it okay not to have the ingredient for Bibimbap? :))

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  23. Jonathan joined 1/10
    Posted January 21st, 2010 at 10:46 pm | # |

    I love it more and more every time I make it! I think tonight was my fifth time? I should pick something new next time =)

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  24. bee
    Posted January 9th, 2010 at 10:54 am | # |

    what kind of rice do we need? we are gonna make this today at my house!
    감사합니다!!!!!

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    • Maangchi New York City joined 8/08
      Posted January 9th, 2010 at 6:03 pm | # |

      short grain rice (known as sushi rice), that’s what you need. : )

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  25. KY
    Posted January 7th, 2010 at 3:48 pm | # |

    Hello!

    I think you had meant to write that the bean sprouts should be cooked for 2 minutes instead of 20. 20 minutes + 1 cup of water will result in burnt bean sprouts and pot! ;-)

    (0)
    • JamieF New Zealand joined 1/11
      Posted February 16th, 2011 at 5:06 pm | # |

      Boiling the sprouts for 20 minutes is correct – it doesn’t burn the sprouts and they still retain some of their crunch. In my opinion it makes them a much nicer flavor and texture :)

      (0)
  26. katoo
    Posted January 6th, 2010 at 8:59 pm | # |

    hi maangchi.I love this recipe so much.I really want to try to do it.But gochujang is’t sold here where i live.So can i make it myself.And how?Please help.Thanks a lot

    (0)
  27. katoo
    Posted January 4th, 2010 at 11:15 pm | # |

    hi maangchi.i love this recipe so much.i really want to try to do it.but gochujang is’nt sold here where i live.so can i make it myself?and how?please help!thanks a lot

    (0)
  28. emi-chan
    Posted January 2nd, 2010 at 4:30 am | # |

    maangchi!!!
    i finally decided to leave a comment for you after making this recipe (bibimbap) tonight for dinner. i love trying out new recipes, the more authentically cultural, the better. Korean food was something of a black box to me before i found your site through youtube, and i must say, everything i have made so far is not only delicious, but so easy! i tried your kimchi and kaktugi recipe first (i was so scared but determined, because i LOVE kimchi and cant find it here) then your butternut squash porridge (hobakjuk), and now this. my husband liked the bibimbap so much he just closed his eyes and nodded happily with the first bite, lol. i can’t wait to try the next recipe!

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    • Maangchi New York City joined 8/08
      Posted January 3rd, 2010 at 12:02 am | # |

      “…my husband liked the bibimbap so much he just closed his eyes and nodded happily with the first bite, …”
      funny! I’m glad to hear that! Thank you for the update!

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  29. Susan
    Posted January 1st, 2010 at 1:05 am | # |

    How do you make hot peper paste? Please tell me recipe to make it.
    Thank you very much. I love your recipes ^^ Please reply me soon.

    (0)
    • Maangchi New York City joined 8/08
      Posted January 1st, 2010 at 9:54 am | # |

      I don’t have the recipe for hot pepper paste.
      But I will keep it in mind.

      Happy New Year!

      (0)
  30. tel
    Posted December 21st, 2009 at 11:49 pm | # |

    Hi Maangchi!
    Its my first time to watch your videos on your blog! You’re a good cook! I love Korean cuisine! Im a Filipino but Im based here in L.A. Im wondering, is there any alternative for Kosari just in case I couldn’t find any kosari in the market? I wanna try to cook your delicious bibimbap!

    Thanks and more power!
    I would love to go and visit South Korea one day!

    (0)
    • Maangchi New York City joined 8/08
      Posted December 22nd, 2009 at 3:14 am | # |

      If kosari is not available, skip it or use more mushrooms. Thank you!

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      • KY
        Posted January 4th, 2010 at 9:48 pm | # |

        I’ve eaten bibimbap here in the GTA that uses daikon instead of kosari. At least I think it’s daikon, it’s white-ish and tender with a crunch when they don’t cut them too thin.

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  31. Ina
    Posted December 18th, 2009 at 1:36 am | # |

    I’ve been craving for bibimbap for some time now so I decided to make it myself. I followed your recipe and it ended up so good! Thank you, Maangchi! I have to say that I love your site! I’m not really very good in the kitchen so most of the time I watch your videos because I enjoy them but I don’t really do any cooking. I felt brave enough to try this one, though, because it looked easy enough. I’m really glad that I did!

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    • Maangchi New York City joined 8/08
      Posted December 18th, 2009 at 2:18 pm | # |

      yay! good news! You made successful bibimbap, so I think it is going to be pretty easy for you to make another dish. Happy Cooking!

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  32. Julie Cline-Sudario
    Posted December 16th, 2009 at 9:16 pm | # |

    That looked so delicious. How I wish I would have been able to try your cooking. I’m American, but I remember a Korean couple taking me out to a Korean restaurant in the Philippines. They ordered bimbimbap. I found you as I was looking for a recipe. Maybe I will try to make this some time.

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    • Maangchi New York City joined 8/08
      Posted December 17th, 2009 at 8:34 am | # |

      hmm, I feel you are ready to make bibimbap soon! Let me know how your Korean cooking goes, please.

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  33. A Tiny Morsel
    Posted December 1st, 2009 at 1:14 pm | # |

    I am SO glad I found your site. I went to Seoul for the first time last month and fell in love. I’d had some Korean food before, but was really exposed to it on my visit. I can’t wait to try some of these amazing recipes. Thanks!

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    • A Tiny Morsel
      Posted December 16th, 2009 at 8:24 pm | # |

      Just a quick update to say that I tried your recipe for bibimbap and it was absolutely delicious. It was actually really exciting to sit down and eat it – it really tasted like what we had in Seoul!

      Thanks so much.

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      • Maangchi New York City joined 8/08
        Posted December 17th, 2009 at 8:32 am | # |

        Awesome news! I’m so proud of you! Now you can make your own bibimbap anytime!

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  34. Herina Firdausi
    Posted November 17th, 2009 at 8:47 am | # |

    Hi Maangchi..
    i’m Indonesian and my husband is Korean, i’m so lucky to found this website.. my husband really loves my food that i learn from ur website and he really apreciated ur website..in december my mother in law will come to indonesia. i can’t wait to show her my new skill, cooking Korean food. hihihi.
    Thank You Maangchi…

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  35. Michele
    Posted November 14th, 2009 at 2:41 pm | # |

    Hi..i’ve made the BiBimBap and Jap Jae recipes, both of which were delicious! LUckily there is a Korean grocery store nearby so I was able to find the proper ingredients. I am going to make the BiBimBap again tonight. Thanks for the great recipes…I can’t wait to try even more!

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  36. Regina
    Posted November 13th, 2009 at 11:22 am | # |

    Hi Maangchi,
    I tried this Bibimbap recipe last night and posted it on my blog http://the-palate-pleaser.blogspot.com/2009/11/bibimbap with a link to your website. I had to substitute some ingredients since I didn’t have them on hand but they still turned out so yummy! Your blog will definitely be my go-to place whenever I want to try making Korean food. And I just love your video tutorials! Thank you and keep them coming… :D

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  37. Melissa
    Posted November 12th, 2009 at 11:01 am | # |

    hey maangchi. i tried the bibimbap recipes and it turned out great. but i add water to the hot pepper paste coz its very thick and its very hard to mix. but it still tasted great. thanks for the recipes. =]

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  38. avi
    Posted November 11th, 2009 at 12:44 am | # |

    Dear Maangchi

    nice glad to know you website, i am very glad today because i just try your recipe Bibimbap and success, all my family and my friend total lovely, just share for you this the first time i cook for my parents and is Korean food. i am really lovely anything about Korea.
    thanks you very much…. :)

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    • Maangchi New York City joined 8/08
      Posted November 11th, 2009 at 11:44 pm | # |

      Good news! Thank you for your update!

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  39. yu58
    Posted November 1st, 2009 at 10:29 pm | # |

    This is the dish that made me very curious about korean cuisine :D

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